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9

I have seen this before when printing on the wrong side of the paper. Photo paper has a specific side that it needs to be printed on to keep the ink from spreading as only one side is usually prepared for printing. It is possible, however, to get double-sided photo paper. If you are using matte paper, the whiter side will usually be the printing side, and ...


7

This turns out to have a simple, non-technical, amusing answer: I was loading the paper upside down. The glossy side should be face down, but I'd loaded it face up. Once I fixed that, it started working.


7

Since they don't print very frequently, they often have the ink-drying-up problem that leads to clogs/poor print quality, which means more maintenance routines that use up even more ink and cost them a lot of money in the long run. So I'm planning on getting them a new printer for Christmas. Given this, I'd suggest a gift card to an online printing service. ...


6

You're printing on the wrong side of the paper... High quality photo printer paper is usually single sided (unless specifically labeled otherwise). The two sides will often be visibly different and the 'wrong' side will often be marked with a manufacturer's watermark. The 'right' side has a coating that is highly absorbent in order to pull the ink into the ...


5

Just swap out the ink cartridges as needed. Note that there will always be some remaining ink in the pipes, there is no way around it other than getting a second print head, and if you do that you may as well get a second printer. If most of your print work is documents I suggest getting a laser printer. You can get a monochrome laser printer for well under ...


5

I have written a more elaborate post in Spanish here, which Google translate can probably help you read. A simplified version. There is a unit for offset commercial printing called lpi. This is defined by the real resolution of a laser printing on a negative film or plate. Let us say the laser plate printer gives you 2400 dpi. If you need 256 tones of gray ...


5

I think photographic prints, like digital C-prints from a Lambda printer, have a certain aesthetic appeal that many photographers who are used to photographic prints from the film age enjoy. There is something to be said about the aesthetic of a photographic print...the luster, the color, and the tonality. From that standpoint, "better" is really a matter of ...


5

I talked to Canon rep from my country who told me that the printers remember the first ink tanks..doesnt matter if they come from USA or EU market or Asian. They all have diff numbers that are stored in the printers memory after the first use


5

Seems it's true: A definitive answer from Canon Customer Services from here: Thank you for contacting Canon product support. We value you as a Canon customer and appreciate the opportunity to assist you. I am sorry that your PIXMA MP560 is not recognizing the CLI-221 and PGI-220 ink tanks you purchased. The reason that the printer is not ...


5

It sounds like keeping this printer alive is a burden that you don't even want to put on the shoulders of somebody else. Instead, use the situation to your advantage and the person taking care of your printer. print 1 test page per week Why would you want to print a test page? I will travel for half a year I'm sure there's somebody in your family or ...


3

Source: I am an ex-Epson service tech. First, this is mostly an educated guess as you havent supplied an example. The presence of Yellow lines means that there is a LACK of one of the other 7 inks in that area, for example if you are expecting a green area (Grass/trees) and you get yellow, then Cyan/Light Cyan is missing. You can tell which are blocked by ...


3

Ink dries. Small air/ink channels can clog when ink dries. Printer dots (and therefore nozzles) are really small. That's pretty much the reasoning behind having to constantly use an inkjet printer to avoid having the heads clog. You need to keep the ink flowing. You can have someone visit your printer and run a print every week or so. It could be that it ...


3

Continuous tone color is the key. Inkjets work by applying droplets of fixed color ink to a page and require dithering (the eye blurring groupings of dots) to form complex colors. Continuous tone color on the other hand can develop variable levels of color directly. In a photo based process like C-prints, the amount of light used to expose the paper ...


3

Ok. This can get to be a very deep topic. But before I tell you what I do, there is a yahoo group called digitalblackandwhitetheprint@yahoogroups.com that you should join, and you also should read a fellow named Paul Roark's website, specifically the page http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/. What I do is fairly simple, but the results I get are quite good. I ...


2

The variability of size and positioning precision of one "spit", as it's called, varies with printing technology and model lines over time. As I recall, one particular printer I studied (and some generic lore mixed in) you have a certain volume of ink (a few picoliters) ejected with one action from the nozzle. Several such quantum spits can be performed ...


2

This may not answer your question, but I buy imported ink from China directly to the US all of the time for my Canon printer without regard for the country of origin and do not have issues.


2

You are confused because dots on an image do not correspond to dots on a printer. The recommended 300 DPI is for images where each dot is actually a pixel and can be of any number of colors, 16 millions for a JPEG, more for other formats. A printer requires many dots to render a single image pixel, sometimes over 100. That is because a printer has between ...


2

You could turn the printer off, make sure that the head is properly parked and the printer is not placed in too warm and dry place. When you come back, run cleaning and unclog it. The wasted ink feels terrible, but weekly printing of one page is not necessarily going to be cheap either, especially if you don't seal the head by properly turning the printing ...


1

As the graph presented in this article shows, using AdobeRGB might allow you better make use of some greens which are inside the gamut of the print but outside the gamut of sRGB. Of course, the monitor should have a large enough gamut to allow you to actually see the difference. I use might as not all paper/ink combinations deliver the same gamut. That is ...


1

The workflow: You develop your image from raw into large gamut color space (even larger than AdobeRGB) and this is your source. The photo editor then handles automatically and behind the scenes conversions for your display or your printer. Or you can export sRGB for web. I just read an article by a photographer who explained that he always works in ...


1

Remove the cartridges and print heads (if possible). Seal them off with clear cellophane tape and put them in a sealed plastic bag (remove as much of the air as possible but don’t vacuum seal as you may pull the ink out of and possibly the cartridges and heads.) Put the bag in a refrigerator (not a freezer). Unplug your printer and then go enjoy your ...


1

Given my printer experiences , with lack of use, I would suggest sell it and buy a new model when you get back


1

There is a paper type selector in Epson settings. The paper selection which yields fewest ink usage is "plain paper". If you are getting too wet print nonetheless, try brightening the image via settings, this will result in smaller ink usage: select "ColourControls" mode of "Color management" subwindow in "Advanced" tab in "settings" located nearby, ...


1

It works: This is an A3 sheet cut on the shorter side to match the shorter side of an A4 sheet. In other words, A4 is 8.27 x 11.69 inches, and A3 is 11.69 x 16.53 inches, and this sheet is 8.27 x 16.53 inches. Not only does it print, but it prints borderless. (Ignore the vertical lines; the printer is low on ink.)


1

The problems you're seeing in the first is absolutely a limitation of the Laser printing process and are to be expected. In Laser printing 'toner' (a powder) is applied to the paper using static electricity then heated to fuse that toner to the top of the paper. It is essentially stuck on top and not absorbed into the paper / coating as happens in an ink ...


1

Epson P600 is getting very good reviews. I have a P800 which uses the same inks (in larger more cost effective cartridges, which was my reason for selecting the P800 over the P600 almost as much as print size) and I can attest to excellent color saturation and black levels which will surely produce satisfactory results. Archival stability for the Epson ...


1

You need a good printer with inks optimized for black and white prints. That means you either need to find a lab that has these capabilities (as opposed to printing black adn whites using a color ink set) or do it yourself. That said, you can get pretty good images out of a good large format inkjet with the standard ink sets today (IMHO), but if you want ...


1

The issue is not in the media itself, the real issue may also be the canned ICC profile for that media. If you want to test the media only remove the variable if the canned profile. Create a new one, then test. Gamut surface colors are affected by paper coating also, there are tow types, Microporous and Microcrystalline, The microporous coatings absorb ...


1

A big part of it is how much light the paper reflects. There is also a question of how much the ink or pigment absorbs in to the paper vs sitting on the top. This can pretty radically impact the gamut of the images. Arguably paper makes a bigger difference than ink, though the number of colors of ink does make a difference as well, particularly when ...


1

Yes, I have taken photos using a Nikon DSLR, printed them on an HP inkjet printer and successfully submitted them in a UK passport application. You have to be very careful about background, composition and pose. The rules are very strict.


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