13

You can't view a RAW image, because a RAW file is not an image, it is a set of monochrome luminance values. When the data is converted to RGB using demosaicing certain settings such as contrast, saturation, etc. are applied. There has to be a value for those settings. You are much better off learning to use the histogram (also drawn from the JPEG preview) to ...


9

There is no justification for removing JPEG processing in digital cameras for the foreseeable future, there are plenty of reasons not to use jpeg but none to make it completely unavailable. From a performance perspective the biggest bottleneck is writing the file to storage card(s) and mandating bigger files would yield no speed improvement at all. Cost ...


8

It's not Rawtherapee, but open source competitor Darktable has a new feature in version 1.4 where the base curve used by a given camera can be automatically reverse-engineered from a RAW + JPEG pair from your camera. See "about basecurves" on the Darktable web site for details — basically, you create a special reference image and use the new basecurve tool ...


7

Whenever you compare in-camera to post processing you end up with exactly the same advantages to post processing: Control Lightroom for photos or photomatics for HDR has lots and lots of options and sliders, there's no way you can get all of them into a camera-size interface - and even if you could they are things you want to change and experiment with ...


6

Nope. From a manufacturers point of view, it wouldn't even be a different camera. They'd sell the exact same camera with some firmware that prevented jpeg compression. When it comes to integrated circuits, mass production is where the money comes from. A product with reduced feature set is often just cannibalised with a special firmware. I remember how I ...


5

You can use Magic Lantern to display RAW histogram in live view and image review. Head over to http://www.magiclantern.fm and download the version available for your camera. The installation instructions are different for each camera and can be found in their forums. In order to view RAW histogram in the preview, you could shoot with the technicolor ...


4

With the current firmware of the D3200 you can't crop the image arbitrarily, you can however trim to the aspects (3:2, 4:3, 5:4, 16:9 and 1:1). This can only be done to sizes in certain steps only. You can access this function through the retouch menu and then jump to the function "Trim". I would strongly advise against using this method to crop the photo. ...


4

The phone's HDR mode will be doing what you want Aurora to do: taking three separate exposures and blending them into one. That is why you only see a single file. You need to use an app like Camera FV-5 to give you manual control, which will allow you to create 3 differently exposed images quite easily.


4

There are two possibilities here: Shoot RAW and none of those settings matter. The only reason to set them in this case is to see something appealing on the LCD since the settings are used to render the embedded JPEG in RAW files and that is shown on the rear LCD during Instant Review and Playback. Shoot JPEG and set most settings in-camera. When the ...


4

If the blog referenced in the question is suggesting that selecting the film simulation prior to shooting has a material effect on the way an image turns out, it isn't suggesting that the image will somehow look different than if the same development steps are applied to the raw image data later. Rather, it seems to be saying that by selecting a particular ...


3

Talking about digital cameras the reason is no so complex. Manufacturers target different markets in sense of simplicity of operation, size and cost. P&S (Point and shoot) cameras are much smaller compared to semi-pro or pro cameras, much cheaper and much sample to operate. They are mostly for people who want to take photo for memory w/o thinking about ...


3

The Lightroom simulations are different from the camera. The former are created by Adobe, not Fuji (do they co-operate closely with one another on them? I imagine so, but…) They are, in my opinion, very close, but they're not the same, and also you can't, in my experience, know for certain which you prefer until you compare both for a specific image - i.e. ...


3

You will have to judge for yourself if you like the results you get from applying those corrections in Lightroom better than what the camera can do. If your camera can take both RAW and JPEG images simultaneously, set the settings in camera; they will be applied to the JPEG images it saves to the memory card. They will probably be applied to the small ...


3

All digital cameras not only correct tone and color, they actually create it. Digital cameras are calibrated to sense light and produce an analog electronic signal which is converted to a digital signal with a digital to analog converter. Almost all digital cameras are calibrated to produce a signal with a linear relationship to the original scene ...


3

Fujifilm released a blog series explaining what each film simulation does: https://fujifilm-x.com/us/x-stories/the-world-of-film-simulation-episode-1/ You will also find the following image about the film simulations on that link: Here's some key points that I believe summarize each film simulation. I've included some quotes from the blog post too. If you ...


2

Your best option is probably using the "Neutral" picture style, this will apply minimum processing with a flat tone curve and no sharpening. This will give you the closest thing to a raw histogram available in-camera but it will make the jpeg look dull and lifeless - so you'll lose the ability to use the jpeg and preview for anything except judging focus.


2

The camera body will impact auto-focus speed, but most of the sharpness is going to come from the lens rather than the camera body. Throw a sharp lens on a 5 year old DSLR and it will likely look sharper than a kit lens on a brand spanking new high end camera. The camera can only capture the image projected on the sensor. If that isn't sharp, neither will ...


2

Use your camera maker's own RAW converter software. It comes on cd with your camera, or you can download it from the camera maker's support pages. It is your best chance to get near the in-camera JPEG outlooks. This is because the camera maker knows what algorithms the camera uses, and similar or even the exact same algorithms are used in their own RAW ...


2

This is really a loaded question because you're comparing the camera to you but wording it as the camera vs lightroom. A skilled and proficient user at Post Processing will have much finer control and therefore be able to consistently get better results doing it themselves. None of us know your skill level with Lightroom to know if that applies to you or ...


2

I would expect no raw developer to exactly match the in-camera jpeg because it would defeat the purpose of developing the raw if all it did was produce results identical to the in-camera jpeg. A lot has been written about how raw developers do differ from each other. Even Silkypix, which is the one that FujiFilm has chosen to use in their raw conversion ...


2

Is there some "secret sauce" or special image processing that makes it possible to see these dim, diffuse areas above sensor noise? Regardless of what type of camera one is using, the "secret" to getting good Milky Way images is to shoot from an area with virtually no light pollution at a time when the moon is below the horizon and the sun is at least 18° ...


2

There is only one reason that any camera is unable to save raw data: The manufacturer did not make the camera able to save raw data. Anyone not involved in the design and manufacture of digital cameras can only guess the manufacturers' motivations. (Why didn't your favorite sports team make your favorite play? Because the coach or whomever decided against it....


2

This article on googleblog goes into details how the Pixel's Night Sight mode works. Basically, it is using the well-known stacking technique, which Michael C already mentioned, together with some sophisticated algorithms to determine exposure time, number of exposures, and which parts of the images to merge. The article talks about exposures up to 1s on ...


1

Cameras in smart phones have a small front lens but since they also have a short focal length (5mm) they have a relatively wide aperture. Looking at the EXIF, the camera on my $200 Xiaomi Note 7 opens a f/1.8 at least which makes it a rather fast lens. In addition when you take pictures with a wide angle lens the exposure can last several seconds before you ...


1

Commonly cameras capture data using the full sensor which gives full-resolution RAW data which is converted into an image and then downscaled. As a matter, if you select to shoot JPEG+RAW, you do still get a full-resolution RAW file and a scaled down JPEG. Your proposed using every 4th pixel or average of neighboring pixels is unlikely since it does not ...


1

To create an HDR Image (in any HDR software) you'll need to upload several photos taken at different exposure values. These shots are called brackets. Then the software will create a single (bracketed) HDR image. Aurora HDR Pro can work properly only with the brackets with different exposures that have been modified with the camera, not with other software. ...


1

All but the most trivial panoramas or HDR's will benefit from manual post processing, eg. removing ghosts or twiddling with the tone mapping. If you let the camera do it, you're stuck with the JPEG it produced, with no chance to correct anything. Baiscally, the argument for manual panorama and HDR production is the same as for RAW vs. JPEG, only more so.


1

I can think of a few reasons why an intelligent camera still wouldn't be as good as a competent photographer: Where would the camera lock exposure and focus? It would have to be at the beginning of the panorama, which presumably doesn't contain the most interesting/important part of the final image so it's quite likely that focus and exposure would not be ...


1

How precise are the inertial sensors? Programs may have to align images based on content, but that is very accurate, plus programs offer different blending algorithms and many projections to choose from as needed. Not to mention that existing algorithms improve and new ones are introduced. That's what manual mode is for. Please explain how a camera can ...


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