24

Yes. You can do things with a wide angle that can't be done with photo stitching. This photograph could not have been stitched; whilst I had time to take a few shots, I would never have had the chance to stitch it together. Also the wide angle has a distortion effect, and this can be used for its specific composition effect and to draw attention to ...


17

What you are thinking of is seam carving. The example you are thinking of comes from the Wikipedia article of the same name. Photoshop implements this and calls it "Content-aware scaling" and the GIMP calls it "Liquid Rescale".


15

Great question. A little over a year ago, I bought an ultra-wide (10-24mm f/3.5) lens with an eye toward landscape shots and quickly saw that generally, I can stitch images taken on a longer lens and produce more satisfactory panoramas. So, as you ask, what's the point of an ultra-wide? Well, to answer it, the best approach is probably to discuss what an ...


12

If there is anything moving in the shot, then there isn't a substitute for a good wide angle lens. In addition, the difference in angle of the lens is going to result in a characteristically different feel from multiple shots at a longer focal length than a wide angle lens would have given on it's own unless you use a specially built mount that can rotate ...


7

For distant scenery, you are right you can stitch. Problems: the time to process multiple images. Instead of 50 wide angle shots, you have 150 to stitch together. You'll end up with larger files, so more pixels to work with, but bigger files. Ghosting - clouds, tree limbs, or people are moving may make seams problematic Foreground interest. Most good WA ...


6

Stitching is not mathematically correct. It is a 2D technique that works with image data. It simply warps the pictures to make them overlap without regard for perspective. Therefore it is confounded by perspective shifts when the camera view is rotated. For instance, lines which appear parallel when facing in one direction might converge in when the view ...


6

There are several key phrases for software which does this automatically: "seam carving" — the basic technique for automatically dividing up an image based on features in the image; "content aware", as in "content aware fill", "content aware scale", and "content aware move" — software features which use seam carving in image manipulation "liquid", as in "...


6

No, you need to enter either the field of view (FOV), or the lens and crop factor information. Luckily for you, for the Apollo mission images, the camera and lens information is well documented. The still photos taken by the lunar module team were taken exclusively by Hasselblad cameras modified to accept 70 mm film backs (56mm frame size, 1:1 image ratio), ...


5

What you get with stitching is increased resolution, more control over the projection used, and possibly some artifacts if something moves or the light changes. If you want to simulate what you'd get with a wider lens then you should use the rectilinear projection. You will get the same proportions of near and far objects. You will get reduced depth of ...


5

Sounds like stitching, but it could be accomplished through a few different types of compositing as well. For the guy, you could simply extract him as a layer and composite him back in to the image. So either stitching (which would be blending the two parts of the image together, or compositing, which would be separating to layers and then using the layers ...


5

You can use mosaic mode in Hugin for these types of panos.


4

It seems that this is what the template feature is for. How can I reuse a project as a template? If you copy a .pto project to a different folder and open it with hugin, you will be prompted for the 'missing' images. You should delete any control points from this template project since they won't be relevant to the new photos. Alternatively you can ...


4

Your problem consists of two parts. Star trail stitching First you want to combine the photos of each camera separately into star trail images. Your result will be a star trail image from the 7D and one image from the XTi. This answer has more details on astrophotography. The relevant part is under the heading Capturing Star Trails. For the stacking you ...


4

The command line you typed for celeste should work. What I would look into next is: Confirm that the file celeste.model is in the same folder as celeste_standalone.exe Look from what path you are calling it, and possibly adding the hugin\bin folder in the path for your command line 'SET PATH=%PATH%;c:\huginFolder\bin' Having it in the bin saved me from ...


4

What differences will I get if I shoot the scene with a narrow-angle lens (from the same position as I would have done with the wide lens) and stitch the images with Hugin or Autostitch, e.g. in terms of relative proportions of near and far objects and depth of field? The differences are those dictated by the lens. A stitched panorama typically won't have ...


4

Why does this happen? Is photoshop creating new information? ... The max size should be no more than 5 * 5 = 25Mb, right? Your source images are JPG, so it doesn't make sense to compare their sizes with a final uncompressed TIF. (Apples to Oranges.) You will get a more reasonable output size for comparison if you resave your TIF output as JPG. (Apples to ...


4

What is the cause of the slanting arc as I pan? Is it parallax ...? Or is it that I'm not doing a good enough job leveling the tripod? It isn't parallax. If you're consistently getting a similar upwards "U", then the consistency means you are doing a good enough job leveling the tripod (or at least trying to), but that that you're being lied to by your ...


3

From http://hugin.sourceforge.net/docs/manual/Hugin_Control_Points_table.html: Distance, the distance in pixels between a perfect alignment and the actual alignment achieved by the optimiser. Otherwise, after selecting Fine-tune all Points from the Edit menu, this column shows the correlation between the points (0.0 indicates no correlation and 1.00 ...


3

Hugin can do this. The only tricky part is that you need to choose the correct optimizer setting ("positions and translation") to tell Hugin that your camera has moved between shots. Here are a couple of tutorials for using Hugin like this: Stitching murals using mosaic mode by Terry Duell Stitching flat scanned images by Bruno Postle Linear Panoramas (...


3

My own experience with doing similar things would suggests that you should take all the pictures you need to take in one go using a using a tripod (note that tripods are cheap). The workflow for the projects I've done looks as follows. You take pictures with a tripod and remote control at the lowest ISO setting available. You should use manual focus and ...


3

Superresolution techniques require pretty good source data to start with, and that source data usually needs slight offsets between each frame (dithering.) Without a tracking mount, you will see field rotation in the corners of the frames, and that will greatly diminish your ability to align and stack, let alone apply superresolution. Distortion mapping can ...


3

If the background is sky, or is lighter than the wires, then stack your multiple images, align them and then for each wire you want to remove: with the image with the wire below and image without the wire above set layer blend mode to "lighten" that will show the top layer's lighter pixels in place of the wire mask as necessary It may be tricky to align ...


3

Pannellum can do exactly this, especially since you mention you are willing to self-host. The project is well-documented with sample code snippets and reference materials for each feature. It also has a multi-resolution feature for very large images, to make viewing them more practical.


3

Layers always increase images size, as photoshop tells you when saving. Depending on the original pixel size, the size of the Tiff is the total nuber of pixel x3 x nº of layers. But with LZW compression you get a lossless, nice tiff


2

How can I compute which solution is the best, depending on the angle between the two cameras, the focal length of the lenses, and the size of the cameras? It seems unlikely to matter which of the two setups you choose. Consider this: pick one of the configurations you describe above swap the positions of the two cameras, keeping the orientation of each ...


2

Microsoft ICE (Image Composite Editor) is free (can be downloaded from here) and can perform the task you describe (and many more).


2

I do not know Autopano --- but Hugin has masks to correct this problems. Hugin is not the most user friendly app, but it's really powerful and has a lot of advanced options for stiching. And it's open source, and free. In your case, the trick is to use masks to tell the program that one part of the panorama has to come form just one image. There is a nice ...


2

Normally you would include a an object known to be white in each frame. There are special things for this, most commonly White-Balance Cards Then, you use the software to pick the WB from that point. Repeat for each image and the colors will now be the same. For levels, I suspect you mean that you got a different exposure. To fix that, you must shoot all ...


2

Check that your camera is level in pitch and roll. These types of issues happen when you shift the orientation/location of the camera between shots. The bumps typically happen at the seams between member images, and the changed orientation caused misalignment. Do not rely on a level on a tripod, especially if you're using a ballhead, as that typically ...


2

Your first mistake was shooting without enough overlap. The program needs distinct features it can match between the two frames. In the case of the roof: you don't have the point of the roof in both images. Ideally, you should be overlapping frames by about ⅓ of the frame. The less overlap you have, the less information a stitching program has to ...


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