5

The correct answer totally depends upon the specific lens and also upon the manner in which you desire to use it. When using a lens on a tripod, some lenses require you to turn IS off, some do it automatically for you, and others actually have IS modes specifically created for tripod use. The last category includes Canon's latest Super Telephoto series that ...


3

It is widely agreed upon to turn IS off on a tripod: The best thing that could happen, is that it does not improve the shot. While most photographers experience a bit reduction in sharpness as the stabilizer may try to "wiggle" a bit around to calibrate and see if it can reduce shake. This is usually below the threshold of the shake we do while ...


2

Let me quote the manual: When you use a tripod, the Image Stabilizer should be turned off to save battery power. The manuals of both lenses (1) (2) don't mention any automatical turn-off feature but contain the above instruction, meaning you have to manually take care of this. As you see, there are no detrimental effects on the photos when keeping the IS ...


2

I am going to break stride and suggest you shoot indoor architecture from a tripod. Shoot at f8 and don't worry about the shake or ISO because you are on a tripod. You will want to pick up a radio trigger, too. The Yungnuo is cheap and it works. As far as IS lenses are concerned, The Tamron 17-50 f2.8 is decent, but I think you should skip the IS and ...


2

If all of your lenses do this on the Rebel XTi/400D and none of them do it on another Canon EOS camera, then at first glance the issue would seem to be with the camera body. The more I think about it, the more it seems to me the problem here has to be in the camera body, since voltage is being supplied to the lens even when the camera is turned off. It ...


2

While a tripod undoubtedly improves image stability, it doesn't guarantee it in all situations. There are other factors at play that become visible when the exposure is long. Take wind, for example. Even if your camera is on a sturdy tripod, wind gusts can cause noticeable vibrations ruining your image if the exposure is long enough. In the city, moving ...


1

I would recommend looking at single axis solar tracker designs for the mechanical design. These will be some form of motor connected to a plate (Where the camera could mount) that get close to 180° rotation of that single axis. You will then want an Arduino with a gyroscope sensor like the MPU-6050 to detect the current orientation of the plane. The Arduino ...


1

Do I have my calculations correct? Your math is totally flawed. At 105mm, the 1/FL rule of thumb is 1/100. At 70mm, 1/FL=1/60 or 1/80. At 24mm, 1/FL = 1/25. Three stops slower than 1/25 is a lot longer exposure than three stops slower than 1/100! You are still expecting three stops slower than 1/25 at 100mm instead of three stops slower than 1/100!


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