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23

Looks like it's related to image stabilization as Tetsujin suggested. Managed to replicate the issue. Switched off the IS and the Ghosting went away. It is a new IS lens (Latest Sigma 105mm macro IS). Guess I just need to remember to switch it off in these circumstances. For those who are interested, here is the final shot


22

Sigma's product manual says: Please do not use Optical Stabilization in the following situations. When the lens is mounted on a tripod Bulb (long time exposure) As I understand it, the problem is as follows. Stabilization works by having some lens elements move around to correct for the the movement of the whole assembly. As Isaac Newton ...


13

Image Stabilizations only compensates for camera movements. IS has no effect on subject movements. None. Zero. Nada. If your subject is moving, only a shorter exposure time ("faster shutter speed") will reduce the amount of blur caused by the subject's movement. Some related questions here at Photography SE for further reading: What is more important, f-...


9

The monopod removes three degrees of liberty: distance from ground is fixed, and roll and pitch are linked to position in space. But you are overlooking that you are no longer lifting the (potentially heavy) lens, so its shaking is no longer caused by your muscular control, itself affected by muscular fatigue(*). Of course the 55-250mm is a rather light ...


7

It's instructive to look where monopods are most often used: sporting events, and shooting wildlife. In all of these cases, it's not a matter of "how many stops" a monopod can provide. It's simply a matter of increasing the keeper rate of shots. Competitive Sports (football, soccer, etc.) Monopod are ubiquitous along the sidelines of professional football (...


4

First, I would like to make some corrections to your post : Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS: Zoomable (I will probably use it at 200mm 80% of the time) Max 200mm effective. f/5.6 at 200 mm. Even if the lens is an "EF-S" lens (meaning it is made for an APS-C sensor), you still need to apply the 1.6x crop factor to get the 35mm focal length ...


3

Do not just set a value in the middle of the zoom range and hope IBIS will work appropriately. Larger sensor movements are required to compensate for longer focal lengths, which will introduce blur at shorter focal lengths. Some options to consider: Turn image stabilization "off". FujiFilm image stabilization is never truly "off", so this option isn't very ...


3

I've wondered the same thing and from my research came to the conclusion that, "Yes there is a point at which Image stabilization is detrimental" The Problems With Image Stabilization Image stabilization can also have some weird effects if you use it in the wrong situations. Once your shutter speed is above around 1/500th of a second, image ...


3

John, I think you are missing the point of using IS. IS essentially works to eliminate the camera shake while taking the photo. However, in your case, you need a higher shutter speed to freeze the moment. So, the higher the shutter speed, the crisper and clearer would the image be of a flying bird.


3

It is definitely caused by the flash (shot of the exact same scene without flash removed the ghost image). Not necessarily. The difference could have been something else only tangentially related to using the flash. When comparing the shot taken with the flash and the shot taken without flash: What exposure mode were you using in each shot? Did any of the ...


3

I'm going to go on one thing alone: Zoomable (I will probably use it at 200mm 80% of the time) All lens design is compromise — you know the traditional "fast, good, cheap: pick two?" quandary? Making a lens is like that, except there are even more factors.1 When you buy an 11× zoom lens like the 18-200mm, for under $1000 and with image stabilization, ...


2

IS is good for dealing with short "back-and-forth" vibrations. It's not as good dealing with longer movements in the same direction because one can very quickly reach the limits of the lens' adjustment range. Once you get down around 1/10 second or longer, the total angular displacement of your movements are probably exceeding the limits of the IS system.


2

I've got a new camera and a lot of stress, so I barely had time to set it up completely before the shoot (nothing professional though anyway). Tracking moving subjects is a skill that takes practice just to become minimally competent. Panning at slower shutter speeds to keep your moving subject (mostly) blur free while the background is blurred to show the ...


2

Let's respond to a few statements in your question: Mode 1 compensates for camera shake in both directions and should be used for still subjects First, IS/VC only affects camera motion, regardless of which IS/VC mode you select. It has no effect on subject motion in any mode. Second, Mode 1 compensates for camera motion in more than just vertical or ...


2

This will be more than an actual answer, a complement of your question, which hopefully will help you answer your question. Let's not use airplanes terminology. Let's use camera movements. We have 6 camera movements related to 3-dimensional space and one additional for a total of 7. We need to define our coordinate angles similar of those of a 3D program, ...


2

How many extra stops do monopods offer for tele photographs? In general I've found a monopod buys about three or four stops slower than the 1/(focal length X crop factor) rule for non-stabilized lenses. For stabilized lenses the monopod will help extend whatever benefit the Image Stabilization, Vibration Reduction, etc. provides by another stop or two. A ...


1

Probably not in the way that you are asking. But there are some camera bodies with IBIS that use the ability of the sensor to move to track the sky in moderately long exposures of the night sky. Rather than starting in the center of the sensor's range of travel, they start on one edge and move until they reach the limits of movement on the other edge. This ...


1

Different names... In Canon lenses, the stabilization is called "IS". There are two main stabilization methods: The optical path is slightly warped to keep the image still on a fixed sensor. This is the "optical" stabilization and used by Nikon, Canon, and now many others. Optically complex, but in a DSLR it also stabilizes the image in the viewfinder (more ...


1

EOS is significantly different from VR. EOS is a brand for Canon cameras. They use the EF or EF-S mount. VR, on the other hand, is Nikon's reference to its image stabilization technology, which Canon calls IS. So, you should compare Canon IS to Nikon VR. I think you'll find it varies from lens to lens how good IS or VR is. The quality of IS / VR is ...


1

Assuming one is viewing all images at the same display size, images from smaller sensors must be enlarged more to get the to same display size as images from larger sensors. This means that the same amount of blur, as it is projected onto the sensor, is easier to see in the image from the APS-C camera than it would be in an image from a FF camera. The ...


1

Not really, but still kind of. Image stabilization as implemented in lenses and cameras usually give you a relative (and not absolute) improvement over exposures done without image stabilization. Since the susceptibility to vibration or motion blur depends on the lens' angle of view, which again depends on the sensor size, and the absolute capabilities ...


1

Because normally you will use a tripod (where you would turn of IS/OS/VR every time) or you want to hold the camera and move around. And at the second option the problems with IS/OS/VR begins, because the stabilization will try to stabalize as long as possible for one position, which leads to the problem, that the image will jump jump jump from fixed ...


1

Longer monopod is better stabilization it provides It's simple - while having a link with a ground, monopod converts all movements to circular and becomes a radius for camera movement in space, so bigger radius is - camera changes less angle while moving around for the same distance. And angle is what actually makes long-focus lens "shake" most of the time (...


1

To be precise monopode do not remove completely pitch and roll. It just move the point of rotation to be not the camera itself but the point where monopod touch the ground. This mitigate a lot but do not remove completely. About yaw shake - you should be not afraid of. You should name it freedom and I think many sport photographers will agree.


1

Don't buy the 18-200mm. Lenses that have a wide zoom range are typically poor designs, because it's hard to build a lens that's good in any possible situation you can imagine. About the only valid use case for such a lens is travel and needing a wide focal length range in one lens during traveling. Besides, given your use cases, I don't think you need the ...


1

Tamron manual VC instructions below. Note in particular: 1. Turn the VC switch OFF when using tripod. 2. The VC mechanism may introduce errors during long exposures. 3. When the shutter button is pressed down halfway, it takes about 1 second for the VC to provide a stable image. 4. When VC is not used, set the switch off. How to use VC mechanism 1) Set ...


1

The Tamron SP 45mm F/1.8 Di VC USD is the exception to the rule: https://www.tamron.eu/lenses/sp-45mm-f18-di-vc-usd/ I own it and use it on the EOS 6D, it is a very fine lens with image stabilization and weather proofing too.


1

I'd say it depends on if you are shooting indoors or outdoors. IF it's indoors i will keep the f2.8 lens. So the camera will happily focus faster with lower Isos and so you'll get cleaner images. If you need the focal range then switch. If you need sharpness then depends on which lens would you like to have and their results (no idea about them). About ...


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