6

There are photoshop plugins around like imatag or digimarc, which offer this as a professional service. The software encrypts a bit of information in a bit pattern and then hides this pattern in your image numerous times. This will work ok as long as there is enough variation in the image, which usually is true for photographies. The information is somewhat ...


4

For me the benefits can be: less disk space (compressed data) less time to load (but plus time to decompress) same for write But I will have in mind few negative points: compatibility, it's possible not all programs understand this TIFF format and can load it one (of few) bit error(s) can ruin most of the image (because of the compression string) disk/...


3

May I suggest HEIF? HEIF is the replacement for both JPEG and JPEG2000. It is effectively a single H.265 frame. Don't store single-frame H.265 movies! Instead, use the proper file format that has been designed to use the same algorithms that H.265 uses.


3

When not using chroma subsampling, JPEG generational losses are pretty much limited to rounding error as long as the same compression settings are used. (Majority of compression losses occur during the first compression.) Here is what happens when an image is recompressed until convergence at q=90 without chroma subsampling (original, 1, n, difference): ...


3

Adjustment LAYERS are non-destructive in Photoshop. You can delete or disable them at any time and get back to where you started w/o any losses. Adjustment layers only add data to the file; as shown by the file size (document size can be selected in lower left of the UI). The problem with 8bit vs 16bit is the accuracy of the math (digital edits are all ...


3

At least in theory, the TIFF file format can handle bigger images. Here's a quote from a technical description of the file format: The ISO JPEG standard only permits images up to 65535 pixels in width or height, due to 2-byte fields in the SOFn markers. In TIFF, this limits the size of an individual JPEG-compressed strip or tile, but the total image size ...


3

Programs normally offer LZW compression for TIFF image files, which is 100% lossless. You should first make sure that your program that opens and views them can handle opening LZW compression (try one first), but LZW is very common for images. Document files (text page archives, and fax) typically use TIFF with one of the CCITT compressions, also lossless,...


2

It seems that GIMP is not able to guess the appropriate compression settings for your photos and artificially boosts the "quality". Don't let the "Use quality settings from original image" option deceive you. Unless the original JPEG is saved by the same library (and in your case, it is not, because it was produced by the camera firmware) ...


2

A difference between the settings used by GIMP and your digital camera likely explains the change in file sizes you're seeing. By default, GIMP appears to export JPEGs with quality 97 without subsampling. Many older digital cameras may use quality settings around 80-90 with subsampling. Using the first photo I encountered on my computer, saving with Q=90 + 4:...


2

If you're talking about how long it will take your machine to open and display an interpretation of the information in the raw file it's most likely fairly negligible. Of course it would depend on many variables: Image size in terms of numbers of photosites (you don't really have "pixels" until after demosaicing). A 9000 x 6000 pixel image will ...


2

There can be less color in the result, yes. In a pixel, each color channel can take only one of 256 values (2⁸). Each adjustment transforms these 256 values to some other 256 values. But there is a constraint: for any pair of two values of input, the highest value of the two must remain the highest (otherwise you get an effect called solarization). If you ...


1

Your example image in png format seems to only have two states. The png is already losslessly compressed, albeit in full color mode, at 16.5 Kbytes. Thresholding the image to pure Black and White and using GIF indexed color mode produces a 10.3 Kbyte file, roughly 2/3 size. ---------Edit to try to answer OP's additional questions Loading the linked ...


1

Specifically with reference to JPEG2000, this page lists several other alternatives. I've used jasper some, but haven't played with the rest, so I can't specifically recommend any particular one.


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