36

Because you are shooting with the camera pointing down, you have convergent verticals. This can be fixed with the perspective tool in your image editor: In theory, you should fix the perspective before you rotate the image to fix the tilt, but when you do it in that order, your have no good reference to fix the perspective, so straightening the horizon ...


15

Ever notice when you try to take a photo of a building from the ground, when you aim up to get the entire building into frame, the building appears to taper towards the top? That happens because the camera is tilted vertically upwards. When the camera is held level (in both the vertical and horizontal axes), all vertical and horizontal lines parallel to the ...


15

I don't know if it's the easiest but this works pretty well for my needs: $ align_image_stack -a aligned -C *.jpg 'align_image_stack' utility is part of hugin, and under Debian/Ubuntu (and other derivatives probably) you acquire it by installing 'hugin-tools' package. In the command above: '-a aligned' sets prefix of the name of output images to 'aligned' ...


12

Increase the number of control points. The standard is eight (-c 8). Raise this number to 20, 50, 100 or even 500. You will not get a worse result because of that - align_image_stack will just use (much) more time. A good time for a coffee break! Play around with the required correlation between control points. The standard value is --corr=0.9, so if ...


7

A better way to align images is by using the align_image_stack program, which is part of the free of charge Hugin panorama stitcher program. To align images, you can copy the align_image_stack.exe file to some directory where you put your images im1.tif, im2.tif, etc. You then open a command prompt and type the command: align_image_stack -a al -t 0.3 -c 20 ...


7

Garbage-In, Garbage-Out A big problem with using DSLR photos as "ground truth" for the improvement of cell-phone photos is the assumption that DSLR photos are necessarily better than cell phone photos. It is possible to make a DSLR photo that closely matches a phone photo by closely matching the FOV and DOF. The lenses you will be using have relatively ...


6

As others have noted, lines will converge or diverge depending on the angle at which you hold your camera. To fix this in images that have already been captured: Use a perspective correction tool, as xenoid describes. Use remapping software, such as Hugin, that can calculate an image-specific transformation. This is how lens-correction parameters are ...


6

The easiest way is probably to just use Hugin. The command line tool that's actually doing all the work below the Hugin GUI is align_image_stack, and if you install Hugin, you should just be able to type it on the command line directly, but the Hugin GUI is probably easier to use. From the hugin web pages (should work with the current 2013 version of Hugin)...


4

Your lens should be marked as "Normal" in Hugin, and the focal length multiplier of your camera is 1.0. The auto-alignment in Hugin can be frustrating at times. I have found that the wider the field of view the more difficult it is for Hugin to align images. There are also a few different algorithms that you can choose to automatically select and align ...


4

The greatest single improvement you can do is to stabilize your camera mount. That's were the highest amount of variability is likely occurring. You need a solid floor that doesn't shift. You need a much more solid mount than a 'mid-range' tripod. Use a heavy duty video tripod or a permanently installed mount that doesn't shift. You need a solid tripod ...


3

I don't know what the horizon looks like to the naked eye but what's the intent of the photo? As a pleasant landscape, to my eyes, the original looks best. The lighthouse appears vertical with its taper intact and the horizon dips as it would if you were looking down at a horizontal line vanishing behind the observer (sit in a chair near the center of a ...


3

You can not. You could overcome the displacement of the two lenses using either a prism or a mirror so you have the same position and split the beam of light. You now then need to decide how to crop for the two sensors. You could probably need to strip the phone and camera from the lenses and use a lens before the light enters the prism so you avoid ...


3

In Lightroom you can use the Transform tool to correct horizontal and vertical lines. https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/help/guided-upright-perspective-correction.html


3

I've never had a reason to do this but to my knowledge there's no automatic way within Photoshop. You would need to just manually refine them as required. However, if you have the entire Adobe Creative Suite subscription than After Effects can make pretty short work of something like this using the Motion Tracker. If you're making an animated timelapse it ...


3

Yes. You can do this quite easily in Hugin, a popular open source Guide tool for panorama creation and other image alignment tasks. You can read about the details in the corresponding page of the manual, but it really just comes down to going to the control points tab and adding them by clicking. (There's no special trick to it; it's part of the program's ...


2

I just did this in Gimp with no additional software. This method will easily and precisely produce the "3 point scale, rotate, translate" that you asked about. If there's other perspective issues though, one of the other methods in the other answers will be required. Both images in their own layer. Select the ruler. Show Layer1/Image1, measure between ...


2

You can use Filter|G'MIC|Layers|Align Layers. You must select Input Layers: All before executing. Take into account that this is a time consuming operation.


2

You could try with Hugin. It's largely intended for aligning shots to make a panorama, so it may or may not be useful depending on your intended final output. If you're wanting to get aligned overlapping images, then you'll want the intermediate TIFFs it produces just before merging. They'll be aligned, warped to the same viewpoint, and cropped to your ...


2

The Hugin panorama stitcher can be used to align pictures. The align_image_stack executable is part of Hugin and can be run as a standalone command line program. To align pictures im1.tif im2.tif, im3.tif,..., you can give the command align_image_stack -a al -C -t 0.3 -c 20 im1.tif im2.tif im2.tif .... which will output the remapped aligned pictures al0000....


2

The open source package, Hugin, can both align images (its primary purpose is to do panorama stitching), and combine stacked images to HDR. It uses the command line utility: align_image_stack (see also: What open source software for auto-alignment of photographs?). So, there are also a number of GUI front ends that can call align_image_stack to align your ...


2

Hugin used to use the lensfun database. But the 2015 version of Hugin's release notes state: Lens database Hugin now has its own camera and lens database, and hugin_lensdb is the maintenance tool. Lens data is automatically added to the database when stitching a project file from hugin. Data can also be manually added to the database from hugin and from ...


2

This is a built-in feature of Photoshop, and has been for quite some time: say File → Automate → Contact Sheet II. It does exactly this.


2

I am a simple man and I like to have simple solutions. I would not find parallelism. I would find the center. You need a nonelastic thread (cotton for example), one tip pen and one assistant or two. Paste one end of the thread next to one corner of the painting. Or have another assistant holding it. Put the assistant holding the spool of thread on the ...


2

A tube placed on the surface of the artwork can provide alignment. If the far end of the tube (smaller) is perfectly centered within the opening of the tube (larger); then the camera must be perfectly aligned with the tube, and therefore with the surface the tube is on.


1

Sometimes it's easier to do in post with "PhotoShop" or other similar software. At the location, I use the camera viewfinder frame edge itself as a reference edge by tilting down (or up) until the camera viewfinder frame is near the horizon. Then, I level the head and lock it in one direction and tilt-up in the orthogonal direction to place the horizon in ...


1

I have no idea if Photoshop can do what you're asking, but if your actual problem is that you're trying to create an HDR panorama from a set of bracketed sets of images, I'd recommend using a different stitching tool that offers you more control. Both Hugin and PTGui, as well as a number of other dedicated panostitching programs, can take this type of image ...


1

Change the star detection in DSS stacking parameter/settings. Change the number of stars by percent.


1

There are tons of software that do exactly that. A number also bypass the HDR image by producing an image using Exposure Fusion so that you do not have to do tone-mapping. You lose flexibility but it can produce good results faster. Lightroom and Photoshop have an HDR feature built-in and they have an option to Align images or not. For a list of Exposure ...


1

Why would doing this manually take a lot of time? Place a camera on a tripod at a fixed place. Put down two pieces of tape to define the front and left side placement of the box. This will ensure that all boxes have the same orientation and left most starting point. Place each box on the mark and take the photo. This is far easier than trying to adjust ...


1

There is special software for face detection available which may help to align head shots. While I don't know of an out-of-the-box solution, you could start e.g. with the face detection software from https://www.thregr.org/~wavexx/software/facedetect/. It can output position and size of detected faces and you can use it in a script. It could work as long as ...


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