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16

Its been a very long time, but I believe this is caused by inadequate rinsing of the negative during processing. The film has a coating to reduce light reflecting from the film backing itself. It is usually rinsed away, but seeing a slight purple tinge on negatives is likely very familiar to those who have developed their own B&W film. The coating is ...


9

The image captured on photographic film is called a latent image. Translated, this means an image invisible unless somehow treated to cause a visible image to appear. The latent image is best when the treatment (developing process) occurs soon after exposure. As time passes the latent image weakens. This decline is due to chemical changes and outside factors....


7

The color of a B&W negative is irrelevant unless you're using color print paper. If you have true B&W paper, then all that it cares about is the relative irradiance. You could print with any color negative and get a B&W image. If your print is what appears to be tinted, then either the paper is not what you think it is (e.g., there are styles ...


6

Each film has a personality that is further accentuated by developer and pushing or pulling. If this is your first go around with Delta, I'd recommend shooting it at box speed (400) and seeing if you like it and then adjust from there. The only caveat to that is if you're planning on developing in rodinal. I've found that films lose a little effective ...


5

If it’s limited to just the first few frames, there are two likely causes: It could have been caused while rolling the film in the developing holder or while removing the excess humidity on the film after the water bath. It could also be that the camera had some debris (left over by improperly cleaning it during the CLA, find another place for its next CLA) ...


5

Are they on the negative itself (look at the actual negative)? If so, they're probably water drops. You need to use a wetting agent (e.g. Kodak Photo-Flo) to avoid water marks. If they're not on the negative itself, it's some sort of scanning artifact. Try scanning again.


5

I'm curious what's motivating your question since the film's name (Delta 400) is telling you exactly where to start. Camera is irrelevant insofar as it's capable of handling the range of film speeds you need. Developer, though, is not. Are your shooting conditions challenging for some reason (for example, low ambient light where flash is prohibited)? Do you ...


4

Each manufacturer uses a slightly different film base. Ilfords is slightly purple, Kodak's slightly cyan on some and Agfa had a slight green cast. This changes by film type as well within a brand. The color can impact the print if you use Variable Contrast paper. Fixing isn't usually a problem related to film base color. Kodak's Tech Pan was the most ...


4

Early photo materials were not very sensitive to light. Additionally bright objects often imaged as a blurred splotch. This imperfection is called a halation. The solution is various colored dyes applied during manufacture. Dying light sensitive silver salt crystals changes their sensitivity and adjusts how they react to different colors. The problem of the ...


4

This will be a personal artistic decision - it is not like one of the developers would work and the other would not. Both are fine, and both are different. Having said that: the typical use case for Rodinal are classical grain films (in Ilford lineup this would mean FP4/HP5+). It is a high acutance developer, producing unmistakably grainy (not unpleasingly ...


4

The best settings in Lightroom will depend both on your scanner and on the exact type of film you are processing. I am not very well familiar with Lightroom, but I believe that there are no auto-profiling function in the noise reduction filter. You will have to try out different settings and find out which works better with the specific film. I am not even ...


3

If I had to guess, I would say that this image was underexposed and then corrected for (perhaps unwittingly) when scanning. Two reasons for this guess: You mention you metered using the camera's built in reflective meter. I believe the FM2 uses centre weighing for its metering. That means that it determines the exposure mainly on the light in the centre of ...


3

Ilford HP5+ is a film emulsion well known for its ability to stand a lot of abuse as far as exposure is concerned. It was developed with newspaper photojournalists in mind - these guys were not known for the accuracy of their exposure measurement. It works well with Rodinal, but be prepared for a visibly grainy result. Not unpleasantly grainy, but of the ...


3

The information you require is available on the Ilford website: https://www.ilfordphoto.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Reciprocity-Failure-Compensation.pdf It differs depending on the film in use, and as always, reciprocity and "correct" exposure are a little inexact, but there are factors listed there to help calculate exposure durations.


3

During exposure light travels through emulsion, bounces back from the backing layer and exposes the emulsion again, this time with blurred light, adding halos to the image. This reflection can be prevented by adding opaque dark layer behind the emulsion. Due to the nature of b&w films, the layer is made of soluble dye. Most of the dye is removed ...


3

There is an old saying in old photography that pretty much summarizes how to think about exposure and development: Expose for shadows, develop for highlights That is, you control shadows with exposure and highlights with development. While you can influence the shadows slightly with development, overdeveloping an underexposed negative (commonly referred ...


2

If you want long archivability characteristics then you should stick to regular B&W film. XP2 is chromogenic film which uses dyes during development to produce the image. These dyes do fade out with time. There was a research that I read once about color negative films life and I believe (not sure though) it was red dye who start fading first, I can't ...


2

The column of the table you refer to is titled "Capacity/litre of working strength fixer" so each 1L will process 80 sheets of 20.3x25.4cm paper and 10L will, therefore, process 800 sheets of 20.3x25.4cm paper, etc.


2

The white spots look as if you have an old and leaky cloth shutter. The L- and BC-series Praktica cameras East European shutterbugs grew up with have very reliable metal shutters. However, the Praktica IV did have a cloth shutter that was notoriously unrealiable. The variability of the spots from frame to frame may be explained by movement of the shutter, ...


2

For the first time pick something tried and tested - D76, ID11 or the like. Rodinal is not a great idea for starting with the tabular grain films (perhaps later). Once you get the hang of it try something fancy. the Massive Dev Chart is a good place to start. The idea with using lower than nominal ISO (first overexposing and then underdeveloping a bit) is ...


2

I recommend some experimentation to determine the exact reciprocity curve for your film and situation. There are many factors which influence a reciprocity curve so while bracketing a 10 minute exposure might seem laborious, you'll need to weigh the effort against the risk of losing a "perfect shot" No one equation or chart exists because there are too many ...


2

Your numbers sound correct. When using multiple rolls of film in a given development run, you Do Not increase development times beyond what you would expect to use if doing a single roll. If the chemistry calls for X minutes, then you should develop it for X minutes whether you have a 1 reel tank with 1 roll of film, or a massive 10 reel tank loaded with ...


1

Jindra Lacko's answer directly answers your question, but I wanted to add this: You can push the accutance a tad more if you go with a super dilute stand development using Rodinal. This also reduces the contrast a tad and effectively "reduces" the speed of the film (If I'm planning on using Rodinal & stand dev, I'll intentionally overexpose by 1/3 - 2/3 ...


1

Controlling contrast like that would usually mean going for a low contrast developer. If you're into homebrewing you could try POTA or Delagi #8; the recipes are freely available. Stand developing with very dilute solutions of more conventional developers might work. Reciprocity failure is going to be a beast. Pota was originally formulated to deal with the ...


1

I've seen this happen over the years. Ultimately, the culprit is either dirt/grit inside the camera or something inside the developing machine. Most of the time it's caused by debris in the camera that scratches the film as the film is advanced.


1

In short, you can expose film as long as you want - multiple hours, if you like - but colour may shift (on colour film) and you may not see a doubling of time equal one stop of additional exposure (reciprocity failure). As mentioned in the other posts, Ilford will have a table and some guidelines as to how its films suffer reciprocity failure, and you can ...


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