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If the original ICC profile is sRGB or equivalent, there is usually no harm from removing it. sRGB is sometimes added to images that were not originally color managed. (The profile shouldn't be included with the image in the first place.) sRGB corresponds to the full color range of unmanaged systems. (Whether the image is tagged or not, it will appear the ...


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However my understanding is that all web browsers will assume by default that the colour space is sRGB if this is not present... Well, perhaps all web browsers should assume by default that the colour space is sRGB if this is not present, but unfortunately it's not really practical to insure that every variant of all of them do, particularly with those that ...


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Usually, in the Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom, the way that camera characterisation is done is via custom .dcp profiles, those are created with the Adobe DNG Profile Editor. The documentation explains how to create them:


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From what I can see here the device used to compare color to judge it's accuracy is not a calibrated or profiled device. Just using a canned profile for a display says nothing about the actual viewing conditions or the displays characterization, so that is a broken section of the color-managed workflow. Color appearance on a phone (depending on the type ...


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I don't see any real issue with your process; except that the third step is redundant and destructive. Try turning on your color space warnings in PS's color setting preferences and then opening one of your exported images... see if PS throws a color space warning telling you that the image is in sRGB or not. If it does throw the warning (it should) then you ...


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Of course, having a colorimeter is better. But of the two options you have, I would trust the second display more. Having a stock OEM profile (for your first display) is not much different to having no profile at all. Most manufacturers provide it, yet variation between consumer displays can be significant. I have two 'identical' monitors from the same ...


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Can I use “sRGB mode” or a manufacturer's ICC-profile as a poor substitute for hardware calibration? You could, but that's exactly what it would be – a poor substitute. Generic manufacturer profiles will not be able to compensate for a specific device's idiosyncrasies. It may be "off" from the factory. It may develop color shifts over time. It may not work ...


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The other end of the line would be scan raw, invert and edit myself. But this seems as a bad starting point for editing, because at first i have to get rid of film tint and apply my own subjective color grading. You mention the Photoshop plug-in ColorPerfect. They accept linear scan data as one of their input modes, which deals with the inversion and color ...


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