4

If the original ICC profile is sRGB or equivalent, there is usually no harm from removing it. sRGB is sometimes added to images that were not originally color managed. (The profile shouldn't be included with the image in the first place.) sRGB corresponds to the full color range of unmanaged systems. (Whether the image is tagged or not, it will appear the ...


4

Usually, there's no reason to embed more than more one profile. With an input image, you embed the input profile, so that your colour management system can work out what colours the numbers in the input data means. No reason to embed a monitor or output profile - they're nothing to do with the image data, and if you move the image to a different system, you'...


3

First, do not use regular paper on inkjets. The colors will render poorly and the ink will bleed. Inkjet paper has a special surface coating that causes the ink to instantly dry without soaking in. This also gives rich colors and deep blacks. Some printers have special settings for regular paper which limit the ink. Check the driver settings for that. But ...


3

You list different things. The 2001 reference is an ICC Specification that defines how V2 profiles are structured. The specification applies to profiles such as sRGB as well as others such as ProPhoto RGB and even printer profiles. The 1966-2-1 is not a year. It's a profile description document number and does specify sRGB which was created jointly by HP ...


3

Raw conversion applications supplied by the camera manufacturers do have profiles for each camera built in, otherwise they couldn't render a remotely accurate image from the raw data at all. These profiles are created by the camera manufacturers alongside the demosaicing algorithms for each specific camera. The same is true of large commercial raw ...


2

It is the same process as any printer. You simply need to print the sample and take measures with the hardware. http://www.xrite.com/service-support/creating_printing_profiles_with_colormunki_photo_or_colormunki_design


2

I've tried learning about colour management and icc profiles but only really understand the basics. I have created some profiles for displays and printers. When creating a printer profile with argyll - colprof for a specific printer / paper combination you can specify a source profile for the image to have before conversion. This handles the perceptual and ...


2

There is a misconception sometimes about monitor color management. It is a two-step process: Calibrating, then profiling. Calibrating linearizes the monitor (adjusts so that all grey tones from black to white appear as neutral as possible) and adjusts the white point to your desired color temperature. Profiling then maps the differences between a known ...


2

Don't do this, make your own extended section instead. Messing with the ICC profile may (likely will) cause display issues as it is the information that gives the context of the data contained within the file and how it should be interpreted for proper display. This question on Stack Overflow goes into the technical details of how you can do this, but you ...


2

Usually, in the Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom, the way that camera characterisation is done is via custom .dcp profiles, those are created with the Adobe DNG Profile Editor. The documentation explains how to create them:


2

However my understanding is that all web browsers will assume by default that the colour space is sRGB if this is not present... Well, perhaps all web browsers should assume by default that the colour space is sRGB if this is not present, but unfortunately it's not really practical to insure that every variant of all of them do, particularly with those that ...


2

It sounds like you are missing a step or two. First, a general note on ICC color correction. The point of ICC is to document the differences between a target and the actual display medium as well as the limits of the display to produce colors. The idea is that you work with something that has theoretically accurate color and then apply adjustments to get ...


1

The other end of the line would be scan raw, invert and edit myself. But this seems as a bad starting point for editing, because at first i have to get rid of film tint and apply my own subjective color grading. You mention the Photoshop plug-in ColorPerfect. They accept linear scan data as one of their input modes, which deals with the inversion and color ...


1

From what I can see here the device used to compare color to judge it's accuracy is not a calibrated or profiled device. Just using a canned profile for a display says nothing about the actual viewing conditions or the displays characterization, so that is a broken section of the color-managed workflow. Color appearance on a phone (depending on the type ...


1

The files are exported in the sRGB profile, but that information is not embedded into the file. It will view correctly in applications that assume sRGB for png/untagged files. It will view differently in applications that do not. If you tell photoshop to assign the correct (sRGB) color space to the file when opening the file it will appear correctly.


1

According to blurb: Soft proofing and ICC Profiles in Lightroom, Lightroom does not support CMYK, and you need to hop over to Photoshop or InDesign to softproof CMYK. Apparently, use of CMYK ICC profiles was removed from Lightroom because they did not work reliably.


1

No, it does not necessarily mean that. It is basically impossible to determine the provenance of a photo just from the photo's EXIF data. The ICC DateTime could have been manipulated by just about anything that handled the image file: The DateTime was probably written by the recording device (camera). It could have been modified by any software that handled ...


1

The simple way to get the same effect is to simply assign, from the edit menu, the ProPhoto RGB profile to the image. This is the same as exporting and saving the file w/o a profile then attaching ProPhoto RGB to it when opening. One further advantage is that saving as a jpeg invokes lossy compression and simply assigning ProPhoto doesn't lose info. It just ...


1

The primary use case is to get results similar to warmer photosensitive papers used for B&W prints in the pre-inkjet past. By using a paper with such a color cast, monochromatic inks (various shades of gray and black) can be used rather than depending on color inks to give the image a warmer tone. This allows results to be much more consistent over time. ...


1

Some additional steps to your workflow could be: Use an incident light meter before taking the photo of the color target, so your have a correct exposure. There are some explosimeters that can make a "dynamic range" diagnose of the camera, and based on that data they give you a more accurate reading based on your specific camera. https://www.youtube.com/...


1

The factory calibration is not spot on. Factory calibration is pure marketing. It may be accurate at the time, however displays drift significantly and rapidly based on a variety of factors including wear on the backlight driving it. Profiling your monitor allows you to keep calibration up to date as the display changes over time. It will also allow you ...


1

Any EXIF tag you set (including custom ones) can be altered by anyone who wants to. It's completely insecure and unreliable. Typically in IT if you want to ensure the secure of a file (that it's not a tampered version), you'd use a file checksum, as explained briefly here. Essentially you create a separate file which lists computed values that have a high ...


1

I contacted online both X-Rite and Datacolor and asked the same question. Datacolor never responded (it has been few months from then)! X-Rite contacted me by phone via their local dealer. He asked me my case and gave me a detailed answer with interesting details about getting accurate colors on canvas. I really enjoyed such information from person with ...


1

Having worked on generating ICC profiles some years back... First, profiles and calibration are separate things. Calibration means making sure that you get a consistent output for a given input (for output devices) or vice versa for inputs. There's no point in trying to generate a profile for an inconsistent process. Once you've calibrated it, THEN you can ...


1

Let me help you a bit for future... On a UNIX-based system, there's a handy little utility known as "find" which can be used to search the file system for patterns. So, for example: find /Library/ -name "*.icc" -print This will find all files with the extension .icc inside the system Library folder and print them to the console. For more details, in a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible