8

Normally when shooting landscapes it is best to mount the camera on a tripod for a variety of reasons. One of the benefits of doing so is that if your camera s capable of magnifying a Live View image you can focus manually on a central point and then spot check around the frame to check how well other elements in the composition are focused. Of course to get ...


8

The technical terms and colloquial usage are a bit different here: Focal length is a technical characteristic of a lens that directly influences its angle of view, i.e. how much of the entire field of view it will project onto the sensor. Large focal length results in a small angle of view, which means the image contains less, but it's shown larger. ...


8

Then why don't we set the focus distance to be the nearest as possible, as this will achieve the maximum depth of field? Because it won't. If you focus on a point closer than the hyperfocal point, then the depth of field gets shorter. Infinity is no longer in focus. So the best would be to focus on the object at 0.4m, as it will cover 0.2m to ...


7

First, a word about what depth-of-field is and is not: In a way, depth-of-field is an illusion. There is only one plane of focus. Everything in front of or behind the point of focus is out of focus to one degree or another. What we call DoF is the area where things look, to our eyes, like they are in focus. This is based on the ability of the human ...


7

What am I missing? You're missing that Depth of Field is subjective. In actuality, there's only one plane that's in focus — everything else can't be. Then, there's an area around that plane that is indistinguishable from out of focus because it's beyond the technical limitations of your camera to distinguish from perfectly in-focus. But, that's often quite ...


7

How much you have to "zoom with your feet" (walk) depends on the distance to your subject. The FoV (field of view) varies with the inverse of the focal lenght (for a given camera), so going from 70 to 200 mm focal length means that your FoV becomes about a third. So your subject will appear about 3x larger in the image. To get the same effect by walking, you'...


6

Focusing at a point closer than the hyperfocal point loses the depth of field at infinity. For example, if the hyperfocal point is 1.2m, and you focus at 1.2m, then your depth of field is from .6m to infinity. HOWEVER, if you focus at a point closer than 1.2m, say 1.0m, your depth of fields drop to between .55m and ~6m. You can see the effects subject ...


5

You say "I have one small focus point, but if I am shooting the entire skyline, wouldn't it throw the rest out of focus? Or should I change to Manual Focus?" This suggests to me that you have a basic misconception about how focus works, and that understanding that better will help with the whole problem. No matter how it's done, a camera lens can only ...


5

It would only make a difference if the display size would be so large as to make the difference between HD resolution (approx. 2MP) and the camera's native resolution perceptible to the viewer. Please note that if your hyperfocal calculator does not allow for inputting display size/viewing distance/viewer's visual acutance then it is probably assumed that ...


5

'Hyperfocal distance' is a distance and as such has nothing to do with the method of focussing. It is the shortest distance focussed upon for a given f/stop and lens focal length that gives depth of field to infinity (obviously focusing at infinity will also give depth of field to infinity). It varies with aperture, of course, for a given focal length, and ...


4

The hyperfocal method is a way of insuring that everything in the background appears to be in focus in the final image as it is displayed. If you want your photo to demonstrate background bokeh then the last thing you want to do is shoot with the aperture set narrow enough that the subject distance is within the hyperfocal distance. The concept of ...


3

Well. In reality you do not have too many options. Let me summarize what will happen. Forget the focal length. Just use it for the composition. Normally a smaller focal length keeps more into focus. But put you ladder in a safe place, close enough that you can scream and give instructions to the group and far enough you do not have much distortion on the ...


3

Are you limited to just one shot? If not, take several at different apertures , and check the rear of the screen making sure that everyone in the extremeties is in focus. Something like f/8 would be a good starting point. You can then ensure the DOF is ok rather than taking one shot and finding out the calculation from the calculator was off. You will ...


3

With the Canon system pre-set focus distances are registered in the lens, rather than the body. The only lenses of which I am aware that offer this feature are the Super Telephoto series. But even those lenses wouldn't really help you very much for what you say you want to do. There is no single hyperfocal distance for a given lens at a given focal length. ...


3

The article you cite is not very good advice if you want great sharpness for landscape photography: it’s based on the concepts of depth of field and hyperfocal distance. These concepts are intended to help the photographer find the required aperture for getting barely acceptable sharpness across the relevant parts of the picture. What the author (like many ...


3

If your objective is to get as much as possible of your subject in focus and you know in advance that most of your subject is beyond the half-hyperfocal distance then this may be helpful advice that simplifies the focusing process in setting up your shot. However, there are at least a couple complicating factors: The hyperfocal distance changes with the ...


3

There seem to two things here. First is your use of the word "zoom". Most people use the word zoom to mean a lens that can change focal length. As opposed to a prime lens which has a fixed focal length. So a 300mm prime lens is not a zoom lens even though it is a fairly long (or telephoto) lens. Both the lenses you mention are zoom lenses as they can change ...


3

The focal length of a lens reveals its power. The longer the focal length, the larger the images of objects will be. Your camera is compact digital; I know this because it came with a zoom lens with a focal length range of 24mm thru 70mm. Fist I want you to know that if you take a picture with the zoom set to 24mm, your image will be in the realm of wide-...


3

tl;dr - in theory, sure. In practice, I've found that it isn't really needed. In theory, yes, one could use the hyperfocal distance (HFD from here on out) to ensure that all subjects are reasonably sharp. That being said, an important consideration for "sharpness" and HFD is the print size and viewing distance of that print. If you figured out some great ...


2

Okay, I'm pretty sure this checks out, but haven't yet sanity-checked it with any physical lenses. Let's say 0 and 1 represent the distance scale / focus ring position at the MFD mark and infinity, respectively. Then 0.5, for instance, would mean turning the ring halfway between the extremities. Then, we have a hyperbolic curve like this: a = 1 - dmfd / ...


2

Hyperfocal distance applies regardless of manual or automatic focusing. The hyperfocal distance is simply the distance at which (when focused on) everything beyond it is in focus. This is a set point for a given focal length, aperture and cone of confusion. It does not change regardless of if you focus manually or automatically.


2

There's no sharp limit between in and out of focus. Everything but the focal plane at some exact distance is out of focus, it is just so slightly so that we don't notice it. There are two reasons why somebody would choose focusing further than the hyperfocal distance - the first being that when you focus exactly on something further than hyperfocal distance ...


2

Like with any other camera you stop it down to a small aperture like f/22, say, of course it depends on the background distance as well. If you go that high, though, you will get light diffraction which will be apparent. The larger the aperture the shallower the depth of field; that is why big apertures like f/1.8 and f/1.4 are usually used for portraits to ...


2

Why are my pictures blurry even though a DOF calculator shows everything should be in focus? Short answer (TL;DR): Because you're viewing them at much larger magnification than the viewing conditions assumed by the Depth of Field (DoF) calculator you're using. Also, because infinity focus and hyperfocal distance don't mean what you seem to think they mean. ...


2

Understand that there is no real Depth Of Focus - only a perceived and acceptable range for it. Physics defines that there is only a single plane at a specific distance that is in focus. In theory, as soon as you are a micron beyond that plane, it is no longer in focus. However, the 'blur' will first be negligible, of course. What the DOF calculators try to ...


2

One friend told me that you just have to walk two or three steps forward to get 200mm equal range with your 24-70 lens The other night I took a photo of... the Moon with my 200mm lens. I am pretty sure that I need more than two or three steps forward to get the same framing with a smaller lens. No. That explanation has no sense.


2

Scale focus. Why I use a manual wide really, scale focus works when conditions are too fast/rough for autofocus to be practical. Check the accuracy of your scale beforehand! Both my Rokinon 14 and my adapted Leica 19 are considerably off. So instead of putting the desired distance over the central mark I put it over the right f4 mark on the Leica. Also ...


1

Since you're planning to rent a lens anyway, you might get a Tilt/Shift lens. That will let you lay the focal plane across the faces of the crowd, getting everyone in focus virtually independent of the aperture. (You might like to experiment with the lens a bit before the big day, to learn how you need to set it.)


1

With an older, manual-focus film-era lens like that, because the focal length is fixed, the rings can be used, kind of like a slide rule, to set hyperfocal distance. The red diamond is simply there to show what aperture the lens is set to. In this case, with this image, the lens is set to f/4. And the DoF scale is only marked down to f/4, so if you're ...


1

The red diamond is the index point for the distance focused upon. As you focus the red diamond’s position adjacent to the dual distance scales changes. As an example if you focus on an object 10 feet distant, the red diamond appears opposite 10 feet / 3 meters on the dual distance scale. To the left of the red diamond index is a red line. This is an ...


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