45

The reason you can see such a large dynamic range isn't that the eye, as an optical device, can actually capture such a range - the reason is that your brain can combine information from lots and lots of "exposures" from the eyes and create an HDR panorama of the scene in front of you. The eye is pretty poor from an image quality standpoint but it has a ...


42

I'm going to give two answers which appear to be in conflict but which actually aren't: There are dark yellows and bright violets — we're just not used to seeing them. There aren't and can't be dark yellows or bright violets — and here's why. OK... 1. There are dark yellows and bright violets Color perception is relative. Here is a demonstration. If you ...


37

This is a very good question, and the answer could fill hundreds of pages - and, in fact, the answer already DOES fill hundreds of pages. The short answer is that the figures you are citing to not agree with apparent reality because the commonly quoted figures are wrong :-). Read on ... Much is available on the internet on this subject and the quality is, ...


28

Question about thing like frame rate, resolution or dynamic range of the human eye and how they compare to cameras always have the same problems: The "picture" you see isn't a "single exposure", the eye is constantly moving and adjusting. The part of tee brain that handles vision is really good (and pretty big), it constantly combines the "frames" is gets ...


27

"Colour" is essentially a property of the distribution of wavelengths of visible light (as perceived by humans). Digital cameras only detect the amount of light at each pixel, they can't measure the wavelength and thus can't record colours directly. Colour images are produced by placing alternating red/green/blue filters in front of each pixel. By placing a ...


19

It depends on what you're asking exactly, if you're asking what focal length provides the same magnification as the naked eye (as in you hold your hand out infront of the camera and look through the viewfinder, your hand appears the same size as it would without the camera), then the answer depends on sensor size and viewfinder magnification, but the answer ...


17

The sensor systems are different enough that direct comparison is hard. There are some similarities, but the sensor post processing is exceptionally well tailored to remove undesired artefacts and the maker has not provided a means to turn noise reduction off. Also, the image is developed by a custom algorithm and the system does not allow access to the ...


17

The image we can see from an infrared camera is what is known as a false color image. What this means is that a range of wavelengths in the infrared spectrum are rendered with a corresponding wavelength of visible light. Just as with visible light, a particular wavelength of infrared light can vary in intensity from just above black (shadows) to near ...


16

What you are seeing is the effect of viewfinder magnification. For whatever reason (probably simply to make the numbers sound better), this spec is usually given for a 50mm lens, even on APS-C. The Canon 60D, for example, has a 0.95x magnification with a 50mm lens focused at infinity. And that's why around 50mm gives you the magic double-vision effect. There'...


16

That depends on the sensor size of the camera. "A lens is considered to be a "normal lens", in terms of its angle of view on a camera, when its focal length is approximately equal to the diagonal dimension of the film format or image sensor format.[4] The resulting diagonal angle of view of about 53 degrees is often said to approximate the angle ...


16

My monitor is calibrated (less than a month ago). I see the white/gold dress, but the highlights on the white piping have a blue tinge to me. However I have seen pics of the (supposedly) original dress, and it is a deep blue and black. To me, the only way I can reconcile this pic, and the pic of the actual dress is that if this pic was taken with a really ...


13

When you look through a viewfinder, a lens at around 50mm focal length will show objects at the same size as when you look at something with your eyes. You could test this by looking through the viewfinder with one eye, and looking next to it with the other eye. When you close one of your eyes, you will notice that your sight does not change, regarding the ...


13

If you look at the specifications of the human eye as if it's a camera, you're going to find it's pretty low-specced. Very low resolution in terms of pixels - very few megapixels - with most pixels concentrated in a very small area in the centre. Virtually no ability to distinguish fine detail outside of a small area in the centre of the frame. Horrible ...


12

In fact, if you spend the night in a remote enough place with clear, moon-free sky you will see most of the colors. The sad truth is that most of us live in cities where light polution and smog do not let us see anything except the brightest stars.


12

Our eyes and brain do things on a daily basis that make LSD's effects seem relatively tame. One of the things our brains do is a color balancing activity of their own. No one knows why for certain, but its theorized we do it so that it would be easier to track prey as they dodge in and out of shadows (prey reflect the blue sky while in the shadow, so they ...


11

Metaphorically, it may be due to the fact that the brain doesn't "see" a single image, but composes one based on a series of continuous "shots" from the eyes as they move around the scene. Each of these "shots" are "taken" with variable "apertures", in order to maximize the overall dynamic range of the final "image". You can think of the mental process as ...


11

Human eyes see moiré in the overlapping of two regular patters. In photos you see the photographed pattern overlapped with the pixels, which form the second pattern. Of course you can see moiré with your naked eyes, but you need two overlapped patterns in the scene. Your eyes don't add one of them.


11

The phenomenon you describe is called color constancy, and it is enabled partially by the human vision system's chromatic adaptation and partially by something I will describe using the scientific term complicated stuff in our brains. That may sound a bit glib, but this is actually a complicated topic with whole books just scratching the surface and ...


10

Inside the viewfinder is a convex lens which enables your eye to focus on the screen. This works in exactly the same way as convex lens used in a pair of glasses to correct long sightedness. The power of this lens is usually adjustable via a small dial next to the eyepiece to account for differences in people's eyesight. Some people who wear glasses have ...


10

Color photography is indeed based on the tri-color theory. The world saw the first color picture in 1861 made using red, green, and blue filters by James Clark Maxwell. Today’s color photography is based on his method. In 1891, Gabriel Lippmann demonstrated full color images using a single sheet of black & white film, no filters, no colored dye or ...


9

It's to do with the way the brain interprets the information provided by the eyes (or to put it another way, it's the software not the hardware). We only see colour and detail within a very narrow field in the centre of our vision. To build up the detailed colourful image we perceive, the brain moves this central spot around without us knowing. I'm not a ...


9

You can't see the colours in the milky way (or other stars for that matter) as the light coming from the milky way is too dim to be picked up by the cone cells in our eyes which distinguish colour. Instead the light only trips the more sensitive rod cells (which are usually used for detecting motion) hence we see the brightness but not the colour of the ...


9

Camera is better at seeing than our eyes. According to http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/cameras-vs-human-eye.htm astrophotographers have estimated that human eyes have a ISO rating of 500-1000 after being properly acclimated to dark conditions. The example photograph has used something like ISO 3200. Cameras can also take longer exposure (=gather ...


9

The perceived color of an object depends on two elements: the intrinsic color of the object, and the color spectrum of the light shining on it. A red apple for example, will appear nearly black with a pure blue light shining on it. Depending on the difference in spectral density of different lights, the absolute perceived color of the red apple will change,...


8

To me the image appears white with a bluish tint (perhaps even a light baby blue) and the gold. or brown. It just won't read as black no matter how hard I try to convince myself. I think its the black object behind it that makes it never go there for me. I can't reconcile the deeper blue of the actual dress with the slight blue cast in the image. It reads ...


8

No. The picture straight out of your camera is what you look like to others. You don't need to reverse it. Think about it - when you take a picture of something else with your camera, you don't need to reverse it to see it how others would. (Otherwise any text in a photo would be backwards!) So it's the same when taking a picture of yourself. You might be ...


7

The formula you're asking for is x = (fl * d) / s Where s is the diagonal size of the image sensor — 43.3mm for a full frame sensor. However, for a 12" x 8" landscape print from a 24mm lens, your viewing distance works out to be about 8 inches — not exactly comfortable — and that's if  your eyes can actually focus properly. A picture being flat ...


7

The human eye is a very complicated organ, which only sees clearly for an angle of approx 2 degrees of the field of vision. The eye moves constantly focusing on different areas & the brain receives signals & converts these signals into the complete view that we see. Our angle of view would be approximately 180 degrees (forward facing) and ...


7

"The pattern caused by the shadows and the grill together looked very much like moiré to me" It was moiré. Two overlaying pattern causing combination patterns is what a moiré pattern really is. When moiré pattern appears in a digital camera, one of the patterns is the pixel grid of the camera sensor. As humans doesn't have a pixel grid in their eyes, a ...


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