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20

Like previously stated here by others, the shoe on most camera is pretty stable. However, the bottom of the flash is not as strong and you could very easily break it off. There was a co-work of mine at a paper whose whole bottom of the flash broke off just from holding his camera that way. He was fortunate that his D3 and 80-200/2.8 landed on top of a pad ...


12

Yes, the Wein Safesync is designed to do exactly that: http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm


12

May I hold the DSLR in part by the hotshoe flash? Yes, you may. Your attached photo perfectly demonstrates that you can hold the camera in this way. Will so holding my camera result in any unpleasant consequences? More than likely it will. In most cases the weakest link will be the part of the flash that connects to the camera's hot shoe. It's designed ...


11

In some cases, using a hotshoe cover prevents the internal flash from popping up. Many Canon models had (currently have? I don't know) a microswitch in the hotshoe rails, that sensed the presence of a flash. Of course, the hotshoe cover's geometry looks just like the foot of a flash, so the camera thought an external flash was attached, and would not pop up ...


9

I've never used a hot shoe cover. I've shot outdoors with various cameras (Mostly Canon since the early 1990s) for several decades and never had an issue with a hot shoe that could be remotely related to not using a hot shoe cover. In fact, the only hot shoe related issue I can remember ever having was due to one of the contact springs on an outer rail ...


7

The extra contacts on the Canon hotshoe are to allow the flash to communicate with the camera, in order for the flash to read camera settings (such as the lens focal length to set the zoom factor) as well as access to the camera's light meter to perform automatic TTL (through the lens) flash metering. To simply fire a flash in time with the camera shutter ...


7

It is a dot sight that is intended for use with a rifle, and has been adapted for use with a camera. They are useful for finding (and tracking) elusive subjects without having to look through a telephoto lens. Dot sights designed for use with cameras are available, as the following YouTube video shows: Olympus EE-1 Dot Sight Review with the M.Zuiko 300mm f/...


6

You are not holding the camera by the flash. You're holding in between them. By putting your fingers between camera and flash, you're exerting extra pressure to separate those two, so the force on the hotshoe is actually greater than the weight of the lower part alone. Usually, you're not adding much, but eg if you think the camera starts slipping away, ...


6

It's called the foot — the thing that goes into a shoe. You can find this in [ISO 518:2006], the standard which describes the... standard... hot shoe. It's not, however, defined there — it's just basically used as if everyone knows what it means. (Which, I guess, we do.) The dimensions given in Figures 1 and 2 are basic for the solid shoe. When an ...


5

Yes, the hot shoe is the same across all EOS bodies - and if all you care about is manual control (no eTTL, HSS and the like) it's actually standard across the industry, with the only notable exceptions being some Sony bodies and the Nikon 1 system which use a proprietary hot shoe.


5

The FZ1000 tolerates no more than 24V on the trigger contact (with positive on center). Many vintage flashes may deliver 300V or more. For TTL operation use one of the following: - Olympus FL36 or FL50 (that can be found used on ebay) - Nissin I40 - Metz 44AF (or more powerfull, see compatibility list on Metz website) Meike is known not to work properly ...


5

The main purpose of PC connections is to fire, via a wired connection, studio flash units not mounted directly to the camera. The only signal a PC connection carries is that the shutter has opened and the flash should fire. It is not capable of carrying any other data. As the capabilities of wireless triggering methods have increased, wired connections of ...


5

Am I at risk of damaging the hotshoe, given that weight of the DSLR and the lens is approximately 50 oz. (1 400 g)? The shoe itself on most cameras seems sturdy enough that it'd probably take more than the 3 lbs of force at play here to bend it, but you should keep in mind that the shoe isn't really meant for suspending the camera. I don't think you'll bend ...


5

Unfortunately, your canon EOS 4000D is a very stripped down entry level camera. Looking at your photo of the hotshoe, I now realize that Canon has removed or eliminated the center hotshoe contact. This is the contact you need to make the sync connection with your Pixel TF-321. The 4000D will only work with Canon brand ETTL flash units and also some 3rd ...


4

I would use the hot shoe, especially with panormas - I have had contact issues with PC flash connectors (even the screw lock kind) in the past; the connector isn't really mechanically robust. Besides, a missed release confirmation isn't so bad: you might end up with false negatives (duplicate shots that the system repeated because it didn't get the ...


4

There exists certain cameras which record this information automatically. The Pentax line of DSLR cameras from at least as far back as the K-5 have saved pitch (elevation) and roll (inclination) angles in its EXIF metadata from accelerometers in the body. When used with a Pentax O-GPS1 addon (hotshoe mount) or with any model with built-in GPS (such as the K-...


4

The hotshoe cover is to protect the contacts in the hotshoe from any dirt or water exposure or damage that might be caused during use of the camera. I've lost the hotshoe covers for all my cameras the first time I've used the flash, and despite using my camera out in the great outdoors a lot (around a lot of children), I've never felt like they added much ...


4

At a very generic level: There's a small microcontroller in the flash. The CPU in the camera talks to the microcontroller in the flash. If the camera gets the responses it's expecting, it treats it as a Canon flash and lets you do everything with it. If the camera doesn't get the responses it's expecting, it degrades the functionality. Canon will claim ...


3

On any iso-compatible flash or camera hotshoe, the sync signal--the one that fires the flash in sync with the shutter opening on the camera--is communicated by the pin in the center of the "square" of the hotshoe/foot. So, to fire a flash correctly, you can use any ISO-compatible flash. It just has to have that square layout, use the rails as ground, and ...


3

I was having the exact same problem but wasn't able to get it working, even after doing a ton of research. I think I have your solution if you're having the same problem that I did; the flash will not fire if you have the LCD screen active, the pulse is not emitted to the flash to trigger it unless it is being viewed through the viewfinder. Hope that helps!...


3

The extra pins are used for proprietary communication between Canon camera bodies and compatible flashes (primarily Canon, but some third parties have backwards engineered the communication). It includes information about through the lens metering and also the ability to control settings on the flash from the camera body. As far as the flash having to be ...


3

Well, if you want to use any of the flashes you purchase on your camera body as well, then getting receivers that are designed for Sony (originally Minolta) hot shoes is a good idea and that may mean needing a Sony mount. However, one thing to consider is that Sony, for reasons I'm try to understand, put an ISO standard hot shoe on the A99. So... If there's ...


3

The large center pin is the main thing (along with the ground connections at the edges) on a standard hot shoe. The smaller pins are for proprietary communication between a specific camera brand and flashes compatible with that brand's automatic flash protocol. If you are creating a self made flash you only need to be concerned with the center pin and ...


3

The main signal that you want to know about is at the big contact in the middle, labeled X-Sync in your second image. To trigger the flash, the camera shorts this contact to ground (the sides of the hot shoe). It's not surprising that you didn't see this with a meter -- I believe the flash supplies the voltage, so with no flash connected there's no voltage ...


3

Is there any way to fix the hotshot? Hard to say if the hot shoe can be fixed, but it could certainly be replaced. You can find broken K1000's on eBay at very little cost (I saw one lot of four broken K1000's selling for around $30). On the other hand, you can find a working K1000 for just a little more than a broken one (maybe $50-$100), and it might be ...


3

Although not the primary purpose for which it is designed, something like this Hot Shoe-to-PC adapter will probably do what you want. Get it in whichever version matches your camera's hot shoe pin pattern and you can also use it for the rare occasion when you want to use a TTL flash or a PC Terminal¹ connected flash without removing your adapter. ¹PC in the ...


3

The question here really is, does it still work well enough to use. It's never a nice thing to have to balance the cost versus the benefit of spending a lot on fixing something knowing that it will never be quite right, but I would turn this on its head slightly and see this as a possible benefit. How worried are you going to be about damaging it further ...


2

The EOS 5D Mark III and EOS 7D require a firmware upgrade to be compatible with the GPS Receiver GP-E2, which will be available soon To my understanding you can in fact use the GPS unit separately or on the hotshoe. When you use it separately you have to connect it to the camera via usb. As for holding it close to the camera I recommend that pocket ...


2

I'm not quite sure exactly what you are looking for. There are only a few main things that I commonly see hot shoes being used for these days: Flash Units Flash Cords Bubble levels Video Lights Microphones GPS Units In the past I have seen them used for a few other things, but this is much less common: Special viewfinder type units Light meters Since you ...


2

The PC terminal is for operating your flash off-camera. When a flash is in the hot shoe you are stuck with it right on top of the camera, when you us a PC cord the position of the flash is only limited by the length of your cable (or the range of your wireless triggering device). Some more things to know about the PC terminal: The PC terminal does not ...


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