31

The light you describe as "green" also contains components of "red" and "blue" light. They are much weaker than the green component, but they are there. Once the exposure is bright enough for the green channel to be fully saturated, increasing the exposure further can not increase the value recorded in the green channel to more than 100%. If green is fully ...


18

Apparently you have the Highlight Alert feature on. This allows you to preview areas of your picture that are overexposed (receiving too much light) and decide if this is your intention or not. This is a very handy feature, but if you prefer to turn it off you can follow this tutorial (source): Press the Menu button, then use the Multi-selector to ...


13

In general, I would also recommend always shooting RAW, both to better capture the full dynamic range of your camera, and also to avoid the ugly digital clipping of overexposed areas. For the latter, it helps to underexpose your shots a little [...] and then pull the exposure up on your computer. OK, yeah, I was being a bit terse when I wrote that. Let me ...


11

The best method I have found is to shoot the moon when there is still enough light in the sky to narrow the dynamic range between the Moon's surface and the surrounding sky. A moon just a little past new can be shot shortly after sunset and exposed so that details are visible from the earthshine reflecting from the dark part of the new moon. Shooting an ...


11

With an image like this, the best and easiest solution is probably manual exposure fusion. It's easy enough to do in any raster graphics editor (GIMP, Photoshop, etc.). For example, here's what I managed to produce from your original images in a few minutes in GIMP: Here are the steps I used: Open both images as layers in GIMP, with the darker image (...


11

It's only a bad thing if the detail in the blown areas is important to you. There are situations where at least small areas of blown highlights are impossible or impractical to avoid: when specular highlights from reflective surfaces, car headlights, the sun are included in the frame. There are also times when you may choose, for artistic reasons, to make ...


9

Well, as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. The GIF animation below shows +30 Contrast, +30 Highlights/-30 Shadows, -30 Highlights/-30 Shadows: The differences between the three are subtle, however there are indeed differences. Contrast increases the spread of tones across the tonal range, so technically speaking, +30 Contrast is more like +30 ...


8

raw != image You have to realize that raw files are just data. Interpreting that data in a certain way can lead to images. Each photo editing software will interpret the data differently or even jsut display an embedded jpeg image. That's why the images I have do not look similar to what you have. I did this with Lightroom 5 very quickly. I explain each ...


8

In Camera RAW 7.0 you can just click on the little arrows on the top right or top left of the histogram display. The one on the left turns on/off the shadow indicator(blues), the one on the right turns on/off the highlight indicator(reds). Alternatively you can use the keyboard "O" to toggle the highlight warning, and "U" to toggle the shadow warning. More ...


8

Like comedy, it's in the timing. Shoot earlier in the day. This was taken in Southern California in December around 5:00pm. Moon. Blue sky. No need for HDR or exposure fusion or masks and layers. The moon is a very bright directly-sun-lit object. Treat accordingly. Canon XT/350D. EF 400mm f/5.6L USM. iso 100, f/11, 1/20s. Tripod and cable release.


7

It's definitely not (and your -/+ signs on the B part are reversed). Here's an example of +60 contrast and +60 highlights and -60 shadows: Adding -30 blacks and +30 whites helps, but isn't quite there (notice the grass mainly): Overall, its difficult to replicate the effects of the contrast slider exactly by manipulating individual sliders - but you can ...


7

Within the constraints you have specified, GIMP would be the best way to go. It is completely free and entirely Mac compatible. You do not need 'full' HDR software, you just need to be able to composite a properly exposed moon with a properly exposed foreground. Given the sharply defined edge of the moon, this is simplicity itself in GIMP. Simply take the ...


7

The problem is that you are trying to take a photo way outside the dynamic range of your camera's sensor, but within the (very wide) dynamic range of human vision. The moon is lit by full sunlight, but the sky by only a low level of diffuse light. You could try shooting earlier, when there is more light remaining in the sky, giving a narrower dynamic range ...


7

Why is it that when the green channel clips, it turns into blue? Actually, it turns towards magenta. Look more closely at your picture. When green clips and the other two channels (red, blue) don't, the result is basically lowering green. Lowering green has the same effect on hue as raising red and blue. Red+blue is magenta, so lowering green by itself ...


6

Highlight priority underexposes by one stop by lowering the ISO, for this reason ISO 100 cannot be selected with highlight priority. In post-process the camera compensates for the underexposure, except for the highlights As a RAW shooter you can achieve the same result by underexposing your shots with 1 or more stops and then lifting everything but the ...


6

The Tone Curve is an extension to the basic Sliders and thus provides a greater level of tone and contrast control by allowing the user to modify the various different levels of light within a photograph. One of the most apparent such features is the little circle on the “top Left Corner” of the Curve Box. By clicking on this little circle, the circle will ...


5

Just to be clear: the clipping warnings and histogram in lightroom are tools for development of photos. Not for analysis of the RAW-files itself. The warnings does (in the best case) warn you if you're clipping in the output format such as JPEG. The histogram works the same regardless of which module you're reviewing it in. In Lightroom the histogram ...


5

As far as I know, the following answer is only true for digital photography, as... "Black and white films and C-41 color films (color negative) can capture a great tonal range and are more tolerant of over-exposure, allowing them to resolve detail even when blown out (it may take some post-pro coaxing, but at least some detail is there). E-6 (color slides ...


4

On the top of page 272 in the manual for the 700D it says: When the shooting information is displayed, any overexposed areas of the image will blink. To obtain more image detail in the overexposed areas, set the exposure compensation to a negative amount and shoot again. Meaning switch to the shooting information display, by pressing INFO and you'...


4

There are a few different issues that you are trying to correct here so let's go through them from easiest to hardest to fix. Some of these fixes are assuming that you are using the most up to date version of Photoshop. The blown highlight in the window most likely cannot be fixed. The in camera image did not capture any information other than pure white ...


4

The basic problem is that the raw sensor data probably is tilted that way after adjusting for white balance. So, the blown highlights end up with a pink/magenta cast. The solution is in the Highlight Reconstruction module, and in specific, the clipping setting — you tell Darktable to just discard the magenta highlight color information. It can also be ...


3

It does not show clipping in the raw file, it shows clipping on what you have generated from it. You will see that if you decrease the exposure or the highlights slider, the red area will change its size. One way to see clipping in raw files (and dozens of other things) is to get a copy of RawDigger. Highly recommended, btw.


3

On the Canon 700D/Rebel T5i, it is not possible to see the "Highlight Alert Blinks" in a full screen preview mode. The User has to set the display to one of the histogram Modes where the histogram is displayed on the right and a small thumbnail preview with the flashing Highlights Alert is displayed on the left. If you click through quickly, you can miss ...


3

Today, I found the answer to this. In LR, go to Camera Calibration -> Profile and change from Adobe Standard to Camera Neutral or similar. From this: To this:


3

When looking to set a maximum black or white point, both scenarios you mention can be regarded as correct or incorrect as they both provide you with an indication only. If developing to export in jpeg for displaying on monitor only, then the triangle in the histogram turning to white will not have any noticeable affect on your image. However, if you were ...


3

In short, a RAW file stores each pixel using more bits than the corresponding JPEG. To understand how this helps, consider a single pixel (we'll ignore colour, the same logic holds but it just complicates everything). If you have 8 bits available to record the amplitude (amount of light that hit that pixel) you have 256 levels, including "no light at all" (...


2

You are correct, it is computed from the JPEG and that makes it harder to tell if you've clipped the shadows/highlights. It doesn't make it less useful though. Most likely both histograms are calculated from a "gamma corrected" image and they will not be able to tell you if you've clipped for sure. The R, G and B channels on your histogram represent the ...


2

On modern DSLRs, the dynamic range increased, sometimes significantly. But there is a theoretical limit to "highlight recovery": If the (digital) value read from the sensor is all "1111" (e. g. the highest possible number), there is nothing that can be recovered, because all pixels which have the max. value are effectively "the same". A film on the other ...


2

Whoa, something is really going wrong with the color clipping in that Lightroom example! That shouldn't happen, because Lightroom uses a very wide gamut working space (ProPhotoRGB) and uses proper rendering intents to avoid negative effects of color clipping upon output. This image is a good example of an image where color management makes a visible ...


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