22

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


19

You 'kill the ambient' when you set the flash(es) power high enough so that at the chosen aperture, shutter speed and ISO the contribution made by ambient light is insignificant to the picture. In other words, taking the picture in full darkness with flash only while all other variables are the same would give you the same result.


15

As Michael said, shutter speed is largely irrelevant – flash duration and timing relative to bullet passage is what counts. Shutter speed can be as SLOW as is helpful – maybe even "bulb". Assuming that the photos is not doctored: Bullet speed should be arranged to be as slow as possible without adversely affecting the affect on the target. ...


14

How to kill the ambient light "Killing the ambient light" is a term used when you want to take a picture that is purely lit by flash, so that you have complete control over the lighting in the picture you are taking. It follows, therefore, that if you were to take the image without the flashes enabled, the image would be very heavily/completely underexposed....


11

The camera doesn't matter. In high speed photography such as this photo it is all about the speed of the flash and being able to fire it at precisely the correct moment. The flash is usually fired with an electronic trigger that reacts, after a specific delay of several milliseconds, to the noise of the gun firing . The camera's shutter can remain open for ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


9

So, why a dark place and a flash is to be required to freeze the motion (take a high speed photo) though in a bright place with a, say, 1/4000th of a second, we can take a high speed photo? This is because the flash sync speed, the maximum shutter speed at which the entire image sensor is exposed at the same time, is much slower than 1/4000s. On a typical ...


8

What does it mean? As Miguel says, it's overpowering the ambient light entirely. Indoors you can usually do this by increasing the shutter speed to the maximum sync speed of the camera (usually 1/200th or 1/250th). Increasing the shutter speed won't affect the flash exposure because it is so much shorter duration than the shutter speed. If that isn't ...


8

I took shots like this in Doc Edgerton's lab in the 80's. The setup was simple. Basic film camera, nothing special Rifle permanently mounted at the end of a long rail Sliding support for target which can be adjusted along the rail Microphone connected to the strobe (on or nearby the camera) From experience we would guess roughly where to place the ...


6

If you want fast recycle times on the 430ex and most other speedlights, you need an external battery. No AA sized battery can deliver enough power -- its a limitation of the physical size of the battery's chemicals. The internal impedance rises as power is drawn, and the chemicals have to redistribute themselves to provide subsequent power. You need a large, ...


6

Because there's a lot more to "taking a photo" than just opening and closing the shutter. The data has to be read off the sensor, processed to a greater (JPEG) or lesser (RAW) extent and a greater (RAW) or lesser (JPEG) amount of data written to storage. Doing that once, then waiting a second and doing it again is relatively easy - and that's what bridge ...


6

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? Sort of, depending on the specifics of the flash unit and the power setting. For example, a Canon 580EX Speedlite set to full power discharges over 1/250s according to Andy Gock's Actual Measured Flash ...


5

For high speed work I would look into the Paul C Buff Einstein. From the guy behind Alienbees, this strobe was specifically designed for high speed work. Unlike most monolites utilizes tail-trimming whereby power to the bulb is cut after a certain duration to reduce power. This effectively means the lower the power the shorter the flash duration. Other ...


5

This is one of the key differences between "speed light" hotshoe flashes and traditional studio lighting. With studio lighting, flash power is determined by the amount of capacitor charge, and the duration increases (slightly) for lower-powered flashes. For hotshoe flashes, the capacitor is charged to full but the burst of light stopped when the proper ...


5

No need for post processing. Relative to the camera, the motorcycle and rider are not moving (unless the rider waves the selfie-stick) so they are sharp. The background (clouds and landscape) are changing very little due to the distance, so they also look sharp. The road and nearby shoulder to move quickly relative to the camera, so are subject to motion ...


4

There are three mechanisms to regulate the power of a flash, with different influence on flash duration. Capacitor switching. By having several capacitors and only charging some of them a lower intensity burst of light is produced. Usually only a few settings are available, and this method is mainly used on pack and head lights. This method has the effect ...


4

Vision Research Phantom cameras are very fast. The Flex can shoot 2,800 fps at full HD (1920x1080). At lower resolutions, the v711 can shoot at 1.4 million fps!


4

This photo was taken by Harold "Doc" Edgerton (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Eugene_Edgerton) in 1964 using his Rapatronic camera. He used a strobe speed of about 1/1,000,000th of a second. See http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2009/08/19/edgerton-rapatronic/ The bullet was traveling at 2,800 feet/second.


3

You can decide how DIY you want to be. If you do not understand electronics, doing it all by yourself is going to be a bit of a stretch. That said you can buy it or build it (from a kit) using Trigger Trap.


3

Just to clarify the jargon, "ambient" light is the existing lighting. Most flash photography captures some form of balance between the flash and the existing (ambient) light, as MikeW said a common reason for wanting to overpower the ambient if it is the wrong colour.


3

The Nikon V1 does 320x120 at 1200fps. The Optronis CamRecord CV does 1280x1024 at 100,000fps, or so I believe from http://www.optronis.com/produkte/high-speed-kameras-cv/camrecord-cv.html


3

The refresh rate aka readout speed (basically how quickly the sensor spits out all the data from the current frame and is ready to record the next) of most sensors is surprisingly slow. So slow that many require a mechanical shutter to control short exposure times. In other words: to take a still photo at 1/4000s, you simply close that mechanical shutter ...


2

You can control ambient light by controlling the shutter speed. Which means, if you increase your shutter speed very high, there will be barely some light entering your camera. Now to properly expose your subject, you can cast light using flash. And you can even control the amount of light from your flash entering your camera by using aperture (f stop). ...


2

If you are using your definition of camera more loosely than the usual P&S and SLR methods of capturing pictures then this is the fastest camera in the world, capturing a path of light 'as it moves', "equivalent to roughly 1 trillion frames per second".


2

I tested a lot of batteries for my external flash. The best performance I got from the Sanyo Eneloop. More than 400 flashes and fast re-loading of the flash - the best!


2

In general, NiMH batteries will deliver more current than alkalines. So if you want fast without going to an external power pack, NiMH rechargeable batteries are your answer. I have Tenergy 2600 mAh batteries that I bought from http://www.all-battery.com/. If you're going to charge them and keep them in storage, you might want to look at the more ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible