Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
21

There are not "ugly" people. There is bad lighting. Well, there are several things to consider. I am just making a list, but you need to take a dive into each of them. 1. Location You can make an interesting portrait giving some context. I do not mind a scar at all, probably it is due to a hazardous environment... what if you take a photo on that ...


7

While taking head shots, is it possible to make a not so good looking person look more appealing in pictures? "Appealing" in what way? What is the purpose of the headshots? – Appeal depends on purpose. Some people have poor teeth alignment... You're not going to do much about teeth without visits to the dentist. But it's possible subjects don't mind ...


5

Post an artist rendering. This can be a pencil drawing or water colors etc. Many photo editing programs have the capacity to simulate an artist rendering of a conventional photograph. Perhaps you should pay a visit to a local artist. The image you post can even be a caricature.


5

The backlight shouldn't light the face, only the outline of the face in order to separate it from the background, also, you shouldn't have deep shadows with no fill (unless you want them) - you need to move and change your light's power as needed, not blindly follow some diagram. Just build your lighting setup on light at a time, one method is to start with ...


4

How can I do this without the camera showing in the picture? Angles. Imagine a line running down the center of the mirror Stand to one side of the mirror and face the center line. Have someone else stand in the corresponding position on the other side of the line, also looking at the center of the mirror. You'll see the other person, and they'll see you but ...


4

Grow a beard (or wear a fake one) The thing that fools most people when it comes to recognising others is facial hair (and even hair styles). When dealing with unfamiliar faces, the amount, type and style of hair provides most of the distinguishing features (facial shape and features are generally used more once you know a person better). Hats Hats obscure ...


4

You don't say what kind of camera you have. If you own a large-ish camera (DSLR or large mirrorless) then you could take a selfie in a mirror or reflected in a body of water. It's a relatively common genre of shot, and the camera can obscure a lot of biometric markers – at least one eye and the nose. If you don't own a large enough camera you could ...


3

Main light above the camera. Something on the background, to soften the shadow. You might find this interesting. Your pic is an extreme version of the 4th example. https://digital-photography-school.com/6-portrait-lighting-patterns-every-photographer-should-know/


3

There was one strong light a bit above and slightly to the right of the camera, from the photographer's point of view behind the camera. There was additional diffuse light around. If the camera was maybe 4 feet from the subject, then the key light was maybe a foot above the camera and maybe 3 inches to the right.


3

You could use a photograph that concentrates on what you're doing, rather than your face. This should be relevant to some feature of what the profile is for. Assuming it's a professional profile here are some ideas for a wide range of jobs: A mechanic: legs sticking out from under a car A climbing instructor: halfway up a cliff A scientist: looking down a ...


3

This is a good question but many of the existing answers seem really convoluted and off the point. All that matters is distance to the subject, as this is what defines the distortions of facial features. Focal length is a secondary issue. If you use a wide angle lens, and you are at an optimal distance for a good portrait, you get a lot of the background ...


3

It really depends on the kind of shot and what conditions allow. That's why I answered in terms of focal lengths.) Shooting around the 65-85mm effective range is generally considered the most natural and most common, but if you want to flatten the image more, you can push it out to the 105-155 range. There are also some shots that work well in the 24-50 ...


2

One of possible setups is illustrated with this image: To take this photo one needs to place camera off-side. Depending on how important the scene is you may cut almost everything and also place camera further from the mirror and use objective with bigger focal length to achieve similar size of head and it's reflection. A model can also stay closer to the ...


2

The key is to get the biggest area light source you can to avoid directional lighting issues. If there is a white or whitish ceiling, then you can point it up and bounce off the ceiling. Adjust the exact angle so that the appropriate amount of light falls on the subject. If bouncing is not an option, the best bet is to use a diffuser and move the flash ...


2

A lot depends on the nature of the room you are in. If the ceiling and walls are fairly light in tone and a neutral color then you can bounce the flash off the ceiling. The angle will depend on how far away your subject is as well as how high the ceiling is. Ideally you want to aim the flash at a point in the ceiling that allows the center of the beam to ...


2

The primary reason you don't want to use wideangle lenses for portraiture is perspective distortion. You have to get close to the subject, and that perspective greatly emphasizes some facial features such as the size and shape of the nose in a very unflattering manner. On the other hand, if you're purposely going for a "funny" or "caricature" look (and know ...


2

I'll be back to add examples to this later but wanted to get it started. From the eyes, it looks like clamshell lighting using a circular or octagonal main light and a big square reflector or big square light on the bottom. Both sides are lit using harder light sources, using either a grid or snoot to control the direction of the light. Look up rim ...


1

The lighting is the main thing. Choose what you want to do there (try lighting-basics) first. Then, shutter speed doesn't matter (because you are using strobes) so pick the sync speed — 180th or 250th. And because you're providing plenty of light, use a low ISO. (Going up to 400 or 800 to reduce the needed flash power to get faster refresh is fine, though.) ...


1

Bouncing flash is the way to go. Depending on situation and the surfaces we have around us, it may take a few practice shots to get it right. Given only one chance I'd choose the most sure way to bounce, but when time allows to search for it, my preference is this: I turn the flash head to point up towards ceiling over my left shoulder. Yes, that's actually ...


1

The bigger thing that necessarily moving the light is adjusting intensity. If the highlights are falling in the wrong spots or casting shadows in the wrong spots, then moving the light to adjust for this might be needed, but if it is simply producing too much highlight in the right spot, then you need to either dim, gel or shorten the exposure from that ...


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