45

A focus rail + stacking software will help you achieve deeper depth of field. However, if you don't have a focus rail (or time to set one up), try to pick an optimal angle to capture as much of your subject as you can. This can mean using an interesting angle (e.g. focusing on the eyes), or using an angle that captures a lot of detail despite the shallow ...


13

Now I will tell you a real training exercise. Train yourself to hand-hold the camera with a steady and non-jerking stroke when pressing the shutter release. Place an operating flashlight on a book shelf or mantel, at eyelevel height. Mount a small mirror before the camera lens. Use masking tape. Assume a picture taking position. Adjust yourself and camera ...


12

No, a higher resolution sensor does not increase the difficulty of handheld shooting. It does mean that is is more difficult to realize the full potential of the higher resolution sensor, but that doesn't mean the results are worse than they would be with a lower resolution sensor.


12

My practical thoughts: Use a tripod Get up before your models Use a macro slider (for you configuration motorized) The technique I used in the beginning was catching the insects with a glass while they were sitting on a wall or standing on the ground. Quickly slip a piece of paper underneath and bring it to a table where a flashes and reflektor was ...


7

I don't think I've ever heard of it, and I've been reading about camera stabilization techniques since the 1980s. If I have ever heard of it, I have since forgotten it to the point that even this discussion does not jog a memory. Most instructionals emphasize holding the arms against the body (or other solid objects such as a wall, or a tree, etc.) so that ...


6

Short answer: No. Since D7000 is APS-C, it has a sensor size of 1/2 the area of D800, which is full frame. A full frame sensor with the same pixel density (not pixel size, but pixel-to-pixel distance) as D7000 in full frame would equal 32 megapixels. Since D800 is 36 megapixels, it will be marginally more difficult to get "all pixels perfect" with the same ...


5

Not at all, and I have both. HOWEVER - You are also working with a much larger sensor, in theory, given the same (ish) field of view, IE a 50mm on the D7000 and an 80mm on the D800, the affect of an identical movement would create a more noticeable blur on the image, when viewed at pixel level.


4

It's not trivial to calculate from scratch the amount of light required (as you have no idea how much is absorbed, reflected etc. and it will vary according to how the lights are positioned). What you can do, is find out what shutter speed your camera meter is suggesting currently and work it out from there. You'll want to aim for 1/2f where f is the focal ...


4

I am not familiar with that technique and to be honest, I don't recall any training or practice to help holding the camera steady. This is because of two factors: holding the camera correctly, and understanding the impact of shutter speed on motion. I suggest doing a google search on 'how to hold a camera', where you will be linked to many stories such as ...


4

When I research, I find some promising techniques, and some dubious ones. Promising: Shoot very early, when the bugs are cold Apply a (light) mist of water Dubious: Freeze the bugs a while, then shoot -> seem to kill many subjects Anything else ?


3

Unless there is an ethical purpose to making a new photograph of a particular insect - scientific research for example, the least fraught approach is to use an existing photograph. I mean if you are deeply concerned about a bug’s well being, then forego using it instrumentally for the sole purpose of your gain and/or pleasure. Or to put it another way, let ...


3

Using that gear, you'll probably be able to capture something. But in-focus and not blurred due to camera shake and subject movement? No, I don't think so. Fireflies are just too weak as light sources. If you did manage to catch them the result would just be a bunch of pale green dots, not very impressive without context. Just lean back and enjoy the ...


3

tr;dr 1. The lens focal length matters more in practice. 2. There won't be more blur detectable when looking at a full-screen image, but since the D800 can resolve finer detail, it can also resolve smaller motion blur (if you're pixel peeping). If you are talking about the difficulty of having no motion blur visible at the pixel level (not full image), ...


3

They can all be decent guidelines. In general, ignoring the focal length doesn't make a lot of sense though since it is always going to magnify shake. A lot of other factors come in to play though and these are just rules of thumb. If you have any kind of image stabilization it will throw these off. Also, some people are much more steady than others. ...


3

Panorama heads allow you to put the camera and lens in portrait orientation to be rotated in yaw, so that you get more vertical coverage with single-row panos. They also allow for adjusting the camera/lens combo's no-parallax point over the center of rotation on the tripod head, so that you can eliminate parallax that could prevent a clean stitch. Thirdly, ...


3

Once you get into the Macro range, a lot of the bets are off for more conventional rules of thumb. Because your subject is so close, the depth of field (DoF) is razor thin at wider apertures. Even when stopped down to f/8 or so there will still be plenty of bokeh in the background for anything that is any distance at all behind your subject. With the ...


2

There isn't a right or even recommended setting for shutter speed or aperture in this situation. Aperture should be determined specifically based on the amount of background blur you want. If you don't care about the background blur, you would want to set it somewhere in the middle to reach ideal sharpness (I'm not sure the ideal on that lens, though the ...


2

Will it make it more difficult? No. However, the higher resolution will mean you will capture more pixel level motion - i.e. a higher resolution sensor is more likely to retain minor movement at the pixel level, BUT this is not visible when you compare equally sized images from a higher and resolution sensor (unless you print/show images so large that ...


2

Put specimen in the refrigerator for a few hours.


2

Certainly the muscle stability this could potentially develop could be useful, but I'm not familiar with this being an actual training method in any training I've ever seen for building a stable platform. I have both a steady hand for photo and film (was recognized recently at a film festival for some of my stabilization work) and am a qualified ...


1

Does that technique really exist or is it just another urban legend? There is no such technique. What you describe appears to have been inspired by Doctor Strange, Iron Fist, and other depictions of monastery monks in training. It could also be part of the patter of a magic trick, where the water disappears or the cup floats or something.


1

Handholding a circular polarizer (or, heck, a pair of polarized sunglasses) in front of the lens of your Powershot G51 is not your only choice. Quite a few (although not all) of the Canon Powershot G series cameras actually have a bayonet mount on them for an adapter tube, which will allow you to screw on filters. If you push on the button on the face of ...


1

You may find useful this wikipedia page You can calculate the exposure value with the given formula: EV = log2(N^2 / t) setting: N = the f-number (aperture) you will use t = the exposure time you will use they both depends on your camera: search a middle aperture for your lens and a time you will likely use (a rule of thumb is that the slower time ...


1

Simply no, if you are viewing or printing the image at the same size, a higher resolution does not affect the difficulty in shooting handheld. The only reason a higher resolution image seems to negatively affect shooting handheld is when you view both image at 100%. Each pixel in a higher resolution image represents a smaller angle, and obviously at 100%, it ...


1

I'm going to go against the flow here and say, yes, a larger sensor does make hand-holding more difficult. I shoot with a D800 now; previously a D300. The D800's 36 MP capture a lot more information than the D300's 12 MP, of course. Simply, take a photo with a tripod or high shutter speed, then compare it to a shot made with a barely-hand-holdable shutter ...


1

As others have answered, no. A higher resolution does not impede on the ability to shoot handheld. What you may have read, is that the D800 handles high ISO better than the D7000. Generally, larger sensors handle high ISO ranges better. I'm not quite sure of the technicalities as to why this is, but my personal opinion is because manufactures will invest ...


1

A good rule of thumb is to never shoot slower than your focal length. For example, if you're shooting at 24mm don't go below 1/30 (1/20 being too slow). If you're on a 200mm, try not to shoot below 1/250. This is of course a general statement and does not take into account skill, balance, weight of camera, hand positioning or caffeine intake ;) This info ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible