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5

If you're trying to control a Yongnuo YN685 via radio using a Godox X2T transmitter, it won't work. They speak different "languages" that aren't compatible with one another. You can use a Godox X1R receiver attached to the hot foot of the YN685 flash to receive the signal from the Godox transmitter, or you can get a Yongnuo YN622 compatible ...


3

The most likely culprit may be that you do not have the transmitter properly seated in the camera's hot shoe. If you've insured this is not the case, along with making sure you do not have flash set to Disable in the camera's menu, then read on. If your exposure settings - ISO, S (shutter time value), and A (aperture value) - are set to an exposure value for ...


3

Yongnuo's radio triggering is incompatible with Godox's. If you do not have a second Yongnuo RF-603 II attached to the foot of the V860II-N to act as a radio receiver, they can't "talk" to each other. If you do have a second RF-603 II and it's not working, check that your transmitter unit is seated fully forward in the hotshoe; in TX mode not TRX mode if ...


2

You have to attach an X1R-C receiver to the foot of the 430EX II to use it in the Godox 2.4 GHz radio system. The X2T is a dedicated transmitter unit and cannot be used as a receiver. Ideally, I would recommend that you consider getting a Godox TT685-C or V860II-C speedlight instead to use as your off-camera speedlight. It's more expensive than the ...


2

Commander mode is for Nikon's optical CLS system or their radio WR system. It does not work with Godox's 2.4 GHz radio system. While the Godox TT685-N and V860 II-N full-sized speedlights can be optical CLS commanders/slaves, the TT350-N/V350-N cannot. Your TT350-N is set into radio master mode [antenna icon in lower left with M], to be used as a transmitter ...


2

Aside from the X1R, there is the US$25 Flashpoint R2 SPT single-pin transceiver. However, because this is an Adorama exclusive, if you're outside the US, it's not really an option. If you're willing to swap the transmitter, too, you could consider the Yongnuo RF-605 transceivers, which allow for group on/off control, but they don't do remote power control. ...


2

I did my research and found out in order to get my TT685 flashes to work with my trigger I had to not only set the channel and group but also set them on an "ID" located in the menus. Actually, you don't need to set the C.Fn ID to anything; it just has to match on all your units. You can have this feature set to OFF on your transmitter/lights if ...


2

If you want to control the 430EX II via radio, you need to connect a compatible radio receiver to the hot foot of the flash. The only wireless capability the 430EX II has own its own is optical wireless control using Canon's optical wireless protocol. The Godox X1R-C is the only radio receiver not built into a Godox flash that I'm aware of that is compatible ...


1

You don't need a receiver on your camera, you need a transmitter. The X1R-C receiver doesn't broadcast anything, it receives signals from a transmitter. It's made to use with non-Godox flashes compatible with Canon's flash system. The radio built into your SK 400 II is also a receiver (that will work with Godox transmitters for any brand: Canon, Sony, nikon, ...


1

Set the ID to "OFF" on the transmitter and the TT685 flashes. For models without the ID capability to work with models that do, all of them need to have the ID set to "OFF".


1

I'm planning to buy a Godox TT685-N. But I want to use it only as a slave flash. I'm trying to understand if I need another Godox flash to be the master or if my current Nikon SB-900 will trigger it. You do not need another Godox flash to fire the TT685-N off-camera. It can be triggered by several different methods, and only one requires another Godox unit. ...


1

A simple slave flash (like you can use with a photocell trigger) will just fire in manual mode (with fixed strength) and will require you to use a triggering flash also in manual mode or at least in autothyristor mode: digital camera TTL metering works with a pre-flash, and that pre-flash will already trigger the slave flash prematurely, messing up the TTL ...


1

I have been having the same issue as well of late. I put it down to a dirty connection (my camera is in bad need of a clean) I changed cameras and they seem to be firing again.


1

Check to see if the Wireless ID number on the transmitter is set to the same value as the Wireless ID number on the flash. If either of the Godex units is not capable of using Wireless ID numbers, then the ID number on the other unit must be set to "Off". From comments made by the OP of both this question and the one referenced below to an answer ...


1

Usually there are some common points that might influence the reliability of the Godox strobes: Distance - the sender has two menu options here. One setting for distant strobes and one for very close strobes. Many users report unreliable shots when using close distance to strobes when not applying the 0-n meter setting. On the Xpro trigger, e.g. go to menu -...


1

Can someone help me find the right settings please? You don't need the right settings, you need the right trigger. Your flash is set to receive a radio signal from a radio transmitter. You need a Godox compatible 2.4GHz radio transmitter with a Nikon compatible hot foot mounted on your camera's hot shoe to trigger the flash in radio mode. You can use a ...


1

If you are using the built-in flash as your trigger, it has to fire. That's how optical triggering works. You can use a different trigger (radio, cable), or you can use a hard IR-pass filter like Nikon's SG-3IR to prevent the visible triggering flash from affecting your exposure. Going with a radio trigger, preferably one that works directly with your flash, ...


1

No you cannot. Though both systems use the 2.4 GHz radio band, their communication protocols are completely incompatible with each other. In addition, while Godox does make X1R receivers for Canon, Nikon, and Sony, at this time, they do not make a four-thirds compatible receiver, so if you were to add a Godox receiver to the foot of the FL7600WR, you would ...


1

The Nikon D5100 doesn't have high-speed sync (HSS) capability (apparently Nikon is known to reserve this feature to higher end cameras, as opposed to other manufacturers), so this option is useless in the X2T when used with this camera. Concerning the X2T delay option, as mentioned in the manual this setting [sets] the firing delay in high-speed sync ...


1

Yes, you need to attach a separate receiver to the foot of the 430EX II. The 430EX II has a built-in flash wireless slave system, but it will only operate with Canon's proprietary optical wireless system, and only when used with an compatible "Master" flash like a 580EX II, Canon ST-E2, or the built-in flash of some cameras like the T7i or 90D.


1

The flash works by discharging a capacitor into a xenon tube, when ionized by a very high voltage pulse to allow conduction. The energy, E, stored in a capacitor is E = CV²/2. Because of the square factor, it's much more productive to increase V (volts) than C (capacitance). With C = 750 µF, V = 283 Volts, you get the 60 Joules of a typical high end cobra ...


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