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11

Photoshop Lightroom does this with the "map" tab. Here is an example of my shots mapped with it: You can download a free trial from Adobe or purchase it for $100-150USD.


10

The answer is simpler than you think. GPS is not included because the manufacturer does not feel it would sell more cameras. It's the same reason they skimp on camera straps. If it does not sell more cameras, it is not needed, the manufacturer can sell it for less - even just a bit less - or pocket the difference. Personally I could not care less about in-...


7

Geotag may work for you. It's written in Java and is compatible with a number of OS's. You can even run it from the linked site without actually installing it on your system (insofar as a Java app isn't installed when you run it...) I would recommend that whatever package you decide on that you make backup copies of your image directories until you're ...


6

Lightroom 4 will look at GPS data and pulls Google maps to show you where you've taken your pictures and lets you search/filter by location, among other things.


6

Unfortunately you're stuck with having to apply the information after you import the photos to your computer. Fortunately, this is inexpensive. Take your smartphone or other GPS and record your journey and make sure your camera's clock is sync'd with the GPS device (or close to it) and then use pretty much any of the available software to merge the data (...


6

The GPicSync features list implies that it can do this, but I didn't see any documentation as to how, so if it's not discoverable from the interface, you can use exiftool directly like this: exiftool -gpslatitude="$lat" -gpslatituderef="$lat" -gpslongitude="$lon" -gpslongituderef="$lon" "$filename" where "$lat" and "$lon" are the lattitude and longitude in ...


6

The procedure I use is: Go to your Google Timeline Select day Click on gear icon, export this day in KML Convert the file to GPX (I use GPSBabel) gpsbabel -w -r -t -i kml -f history.kml -o gpx -F history.gpx Get (if you do not have) Geotag software Install (if you do not have) JVM Start Geotag software Add your images Load track from file Adjust camera ...


6

They can use machine learning to guess location from photo Guessing the location of a randomly chosen Street View image is hard, even for well-traveled humans. But Google’s latest artificial-intelligence machine manages it with relative ease. [...] “PlaNet is able to localize 3.6 percent of the images at street-level accuracy and 10.1 percent at ...


5

Jeffrey Friedl's Geooencoding plugin for Adobe Lightroom can do this. It achieves it by querying Google Maps. There is a also a public beta test for Lightroom 4 (the full release of Lightroom 4 will presumably happen later this year), and it has some more abilities in the mapping area. I don't know how much it overlaps with Jeffrey's plugin. But it ...


5

I don't know about you but my smartphone just doesn't have the battery life to make this work. I therefore use a standalone GPS device made by Holux. It's Bluetooth-capable and transmits the GPS coordinates to a Foolography Unleashed device attached to my camera. The Holux device runs the whole day on a single charge, and with this setup all my images ...


5

MapAPic is an iPhone app that lets you geotag your locations, and create a searchable list of locations, along with multiple pictures, tags, etc. I think it does exactly what you need. Disclaimer: I am the author of the app :)


5

You can do it from the Map module, by saying Map > Tracklog > Load Tracklog.... It's somewhat awkward because the map takes over most of your screen, forcing you to use the Filmstrip to select the photos the tracklog will get applied to. I've been using Jeffrey Friedl's Geoencoding Support plugin since Lightroom 2, and upgraded for Lightroom 4 because the ...


5

I'd love to see a GPS in more (all!) cameras, but that's obviously not happening. My wife had a Nikon P6000, which has a GPS in it. The battery life because of the GPS was horrid. Even though you could adjust how often the GPS would activate, it sucked the battery dry very quickly. Yes, it could be turned off, but if you wanted to use it... well, you should ...


5

It seems that there is no way to create a tracklog from within Lightroom. I just did a Google search on that and looked in Lightroom 4 for options. You can create a tracklog from your geotagged pictures using exiftools. Save the following print configuration to a file named gpx.fmt in your working directory. #------------------------------------------------...


5

None of the GoPro cameras can geotag photos. Because they don't have GPS built in, or any way of connecting to a separate device. The GoPro app does not support geotagging. So your aerial photos will not be geotagged. But you can geotag them afterwards. ie use a GPS device to record a tracklog, then sync this with the timestamps of the photos. There is a ...


5

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


5

Not an ideal solution, but following is the quickest and most reliable solution I found: First, geotag a handfull of photos at critical waypoint (first and last on the track, as well as at the major bends). I prefer using GeoSetter for this, but there is a number of good applications. Next, create a GPS log out of these few geotagged photos using ExifTool, ...


4

I have not tried this, but it appears that GeoSetter supports visualizing the heading data from GPS data if the GPS device recorded it. Optionally, you could add this data manually after the fact. From the change log: Optional synchronizing of heading data when synchronizing with GPS track files More notes and some screenshots for the feature are ...


4

I use OpenGPS Tracker. It is free and open source and doesn't steal your data. You can get it at the link, on Google's Appstore, or through FDroid. I then start tracking, it will ask for a name of the track, and at the end of the day/journey, I will stop tracking and then go on share. On clicking share, a tool comes up, where you can choose between KMZ (...


4

Jeffrey Friedl's Geocoding plugin is excellent. I have used it with Lightroom versions 3 and 4, but I believe it also works with version 2. It supports bulk reverse-Geocoding and one-by-one geocoding (it can also work with GPS tracks and it integrates with Google Earth, but it sounds like you don't need those features). It uses the Google Maps API to ...


4

I don't know of any way to modify the way that Lightroom itself displays the map. But Google Maps apparently allows you to make changes and fix errors. An alternative is to use Jeffrey Friedl's GPS plugin for Lightroom which does allow you to use some other mapping sources, in a limited way.


4

What you are looking for is software that does reverse geocoding. Googling around shows several packages that do it. Skyjuice is a package that claims to do it. But this question has lots more answers including the claim, unverified by me but verified in the comments below, that Lightroom 4 does it! That would be cool.


4

Gpicsync is an open source software that can run in Windows, Linux, or Mac OS. It includes a tool to export your geotagged pictures into a KMZ file. You can then use this KMZ file to create a map in Google Maps (and probably other mapping applications).


4

Three options: For a single photo I use Pic2Map as an online solution or Photo GPS Extract as a software, which both utilize EXIF GPS information to map a photo. or For bulk photos, Canon has a software called Map Utility which works with both geotagged photos and also GPS logs from the camera itself:


4

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


4

There exists certain cameras which record this information automatically. The Pentax line of DSLR cameras from at least as far back as the K-5 have saved pitch (elevation) and roll (inclination) angles in its EXIF metadata from accelerometers in the body. When used with a Pentax O-GPS1 addon (hotshoe mount) or with any model with built-in GPS (such as the K-...


4

Yes, it is. Lightroom can do all the things you asked for (and more). The process should be non-destructive and the images unchanged unless I explicitly allow this (see points below). Lightroom does this. All the adjustments you make are stored in the Lightroom database, the original RAW files are never touched in any way (though you can chose to convert ...


3

MapAPic Location Scout is good for remembering locations. After you add some locations, you can tag them, search, get directions, share/print as PDFs, and more. UPDATE: As of June 2013, MapAPic can read geo-location exif data from images, and create new locations using that data!


3

I use an external Garmin GPS and Jeffry Friedl's excellent GPS Supportplugin to lightrom which takes the tracks and geo-encodes the files in my library for me from the track data. Oh yeah, and I make sure the clocks are synchronised!


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