8

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


8

The procedure I use is: Go to your Google Timeline Select day Click on gear icon, export this day in KML Convert the file to GPX (I use GPSBabel) gpsbabel -w -r -t -i kml -f history.kml -o gpx -F history.gpx Get (if you do not have) Geotag software Install (if you do not have) JVM Start Geotag software Add your images Load track from file Adjust camera ...


6

The GPicSync features list implies that it can do this, but I didn't see any documentation as to how, so if it's not discoverable from the interface, you can use exiftool directly like this: exiftool -gpslatitude="$lat" -gpslatituderef="$lat" -gpslongitude="$lon" -gpslongituderef="$lon" "$filename" where "$lat" and "$lon" are the lattitude and longitude in ...


6

There exists certain cameras which record this information automatically. The Pentax line of DSLR cameras from at least as far back as the K-5 have saved pitch (elevation) and roll (inclination) angles in its EXIF metadata from accelerometers in the body. When used with a Pentax O-GPS1 addon (hotshoe mount) or with any model with built-in GPS (such as the K-...


6

They can use machine learning to guess location from photo Guessing the location of a randomly chosen Street View image is hard, even for well-traveled humans. But Google’s latest artificial-intelligence machine manages it with relative ease. [...] “PlaNet is able to localize 3.6 percent of the images at street-level accuracy and 10.1 percent at ...


5

None of the GoPro cameras can geotag photos. Because they don't have GPS built in, or any way of connecting to a separate device. The GoPro app does not support geotagging. So your aerial photos will not be geotagged. But you can geotag them afterwards. ie use a GPS device to record a tracklog, then sync this with the timestamps of the photos. There is a ...


5

Most of the OSX GUI applications for manipulating exif information rely on Phil Harvey's exiftool, an open source perl library and cross-platform command-line tool for manipulating EXIF information. HoudahGPS, Geotagger, and GPSPhotoLinker all rely on exiftool to write EXIF tags. And since exiftool can write to Canon RAW files, these apps are likely to be ...


5

Not an ideal solution, but following is the quickest and most reliable solution I found: First, geotag a handfull of photos at critical waypoint (first and last on the track, as well as at the major bends). I prefer using GeoSetter for this, but there is a number of good applications. Next, create a GPS log out of these few geotagged photos using ExifTool, ...


5

It seems that there is no way to create a tracklog from within Lightroom. I just did a Google search on that and looked in Lightroom 4 for options. You can create a tracklog from your geotagged pictures using exiftools. Save the following print configuration to a file named gpx.fmt in your working directory. #------------------------------------------------...


5

I'm actually going to answer the question with a wider focus than just the 5D or dSLRs, but for interchangeable-lens system cameras in general, to try and get a more useful answer. When it comes to geotagging your images with a system camera, there are several options, some rely on the camera feature set, and some don't. I'm listing them from least to most ...


5

Google Location History KML files may be downloaded from: Google Timeline, as RomeoNinov describes. The problem with these files is the timestamps and trackpoints are spread too far apart for some software to interpolate. Google Takeout. Takeout KML files appear to have altitude information and more frequent recordings than the Timeline KML files. Geotags ...


4

Three options: For a single photo I use Pic2Map as an online solution or Photo GPS Extract as a software, which both utilize EXIF GPS information to map a photo. or For bulk photos, Canon has a software called Map Utility which works with both geotagged photos and also GPS logs from the camera itself:


4

Yes, it is. Lightroom can do all the things you asked for (and more). The process should be non-destructive and the images unchanged unless I explicitly allow this (see points below). Lightroom does this. All the adjustments you make are stored in the Lightroom database, the original RAW files are never touched in any way (though you can chose to convert ...


3

I would think it would be a lot easier to create a tracklog manually. I think you could do that in Google Earth; select a bunch of likely waypoints and then a path to create one and export. I would guess it will not have any timestamps, so you'd have to use a text editor to add some, bracketed by your photos timestamps. Then use any of various georeferencing ...


3

I have had quite good success with houdahGeo, in particular with Aperture. For this you open the photos you want to geotag from houdahGeo (you can open photos already in your Aperture Library) select them and then geotag them using either a map or a GPX file. Then you can reverse geocode and write the data back to the original Raw files. HoudahGeo then ...


3

I created a project recently that does exactly this, traverse your Google Photos and outputs a map (kml file). https://bitbucket.org/blackey02/city-log


3

I'm not sure how to do this in Lightroom, or if you even can, but I have an alternate solution: remove the DNGs from Lightroom, then use Exiftool too copy the GPS tags from the JPEG files to the DNG files, and then re-import. If I understand the situation correctly, this won't undo your organization, since you can leave the JPEGs as placeholders for the ...


3

Go to Google Maps and click on the desired location. The URL will change to something like https://www.google.com/maps/@[lat],[long],[alt]z Use exiftool to tag your photo: exiftool -GPSLatitude="$lat" -GPSLongitude="$lon" -GPSAltitude="$alt" -GPSAltitudeRef=0 "$file" If you have Google Location History turned on, you can download KML files from Google ...


3

I run an app on my phone that logs GPS positions and use the exif time stamps on the images to sync later on a PC with a script that writes the GPS coordinates to the image files.


3

In Gimp 2.10, the dialog that you reach via Image>Metadata>Edit metadata has a "GPS" tab. This is a new feature in Gimp 2.10, IIRC. Edit: it seems to be too buggy to be usable. The longitude and latitude values are truncated if you edit them...


2

First off, a reminder: The IPTC spec clearly distinguishes "Location Created" (position of the photographer) vs "Location Shown" (main subject seen in image). No camera or GPS unit can set these GPSDestXYZ EXIF tags. They are about a subjective concept. You need software in post-processing to tell what is the "Location Shown". I don't know any software that ...


2

I have used http://www.photoplace.io. It loads your photos and it can create a kmz file for Google Earth, it was really easy.


2

You can use an Eyefi sd card in your camera so as the card sends the files to your android device, the Eyefi app will add the GPS info to the EXIF data. Totally automated.


2

Enable Filters (in the Library menu), select the Metadata filter, then choose the "GPS Data" filter. There, you can select "No coordinates." Of course, if there are no coordinates, it's not geotagged. Similarly, you can use any of the location filters ("Location," "City," "State/Province," and "Country") and choose "Unknown..." to filter for those with no ...


2

I don't think there's anything like that. You may be able to find someone to write a bunch of code for an open source program, maybe, but I don't think you'll find that in particular as a default option for a program. To batch-edit exif data for a single location, however, I find Geosetter to be the best program available. You can pick a bunch of images and ...


2

If you change the LR settings to save your edits into sidecar files (which is a good idea anyway), they will not get lost. You remove the file from LR catalog, then add it back; LR will read the new metadata, and apply the edits from the sidecar file. Note though that some metadata affects the edit results - like lens used -> corrections applied; etc.


2

In 2018 Google increased pricing of the Google Maps API. Consequently it's more difficult to find reasonably priced geotagging software that lets you select the location using Google Maps. Lightroom has arguably the most intuitive geotagging interface. Geotagging stopped working in the standalone versions of Lightroom, but a quite involved workaround is to ...


2

The way I have done it in the past is this: Carry a handheld GPS, which records a GPS track Take your pictures, while carrying the GPS For best results, take a picture of your GPS displaying the current (GPS) time Use an application, which correlates the timestamps of your photos with the position recorded in the track Let that application store the ...


2

There are several options, but all of the take time. There is no such thing as a free lunch (or free beer): Add geolocation in your photomanagement software: this is the manual way. This procedures relies on your memory and the functionality provided in your photomanagement software such as Lightroom, ACDSee, etc. Here are two descriptions: by Photography ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible