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10

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


10

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


10

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


9

Cameras can be affected by fungus, but in real world usage they usually aren't as vulnerable as lenses. There are a few reasons for this. Most lenses that have a fungus issue have been stored for long periods in dark environments without being used. It usually takes months or even years for the fungus to become a significant problem. There are more of us ...


8

That's definitely fungus, and it's not going to go away. The first question to ask is it affecting your image quality. If it is not then control the problem, always keeping the lens in a dry environment. You could get it professionally cleaned, but honestly for that lens you could buy a replacement for a lot cheaper. You may also want to read about some ...


8

That looks like fungus. Here's some information from the Zeiss website regarding fungus. If it is fungus you may be able to halt its progress with an ultraviolet light source (removing the lens and placing it in strong sunlight is one thing to try). If it's not affecting your images too badly then live with it as fungus can permanently and irreparably damage ...


7

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


5

Interestingly enough, optics made for hunting rifles often come with transparent lens caps for both the front and rear lenses. This allows the scope to be used, albeit with less optical precision, without taking the time necessary to flip up or remove the covers if game unexpectedly presents itself. The main reason lens and body caps are still black plastic ...


5

Lens caps are opaque to keep light out of the camera. This is something you really want when there's light-sensitive film in it rather than a digital sensor. Most shutters work well, but a tiny leak will result in fogging if light's allowed in over the long term. I'm not sure the fungus angle is valid or not since there are other things that would grow ...


5

Your description and pic suggests that your lens has fungus. The snowflake suggests a web like spread, synonymous with Fungus. In general, fungus does not spread from one lens to another. However, the likelihood of 2 lenses getting fungus if they are both stored together in a dust filled humid environment; is very high. To germinate, these fungus spores ...


5

Unless your room is very dusty, you should be fine. I did my PhD in microbiology, and from my experience, the main source of dust or dirt are (1) air currents and (2) you yourself. Avoid any air currents (opened windows, AC, ventilators). When disassembling the lens, put the elements in covered clean plastic containers (like tupperware or something). ...


4

I don't think that there are LEDs that are in the germicidal UV range. All the germicidal UV lamps I have seen have been mercury vapor, which is basically a flourescent without the phosphor coating on the inside. They also have to be made from quartz, not glass, since ordinary glass will absorve these wavelengths. I don't know the UV properties of glass ...


4

Since lens replacement parts exist and there are people who know how to disassemble and assemble lenses you can say that theoretically there is no damage that can't be fixed - However in the real world there are kinds of damage that the manufacturers won't fix and even more kinds of damage where the cost of fixing would be more than the cost of replacing ...


4

Fungus spores are already everywhere, so your DSLR and its lenses are already infected (and probably were since construction). But fungus needs high humidity to grow (which is why it's relatively rare to see it, except in humid climates). So I think it very unlikely that your DSLR will start showing fungus growth from being stocked (dry) near an infected ...


4

UV light will kill the fungus, so all you need to do is let the lens be exposed to sunlight for a few days. Be sure to remove any UV filter you might have attached to the front of the lens. Unfortunately, killing the fungus is not removing it. If it does not affect image quality, then that might not be a short-term concern. But you'll likely need to ...


3

Addendum: Do not store a lens with mold together with other lenses! Also don't attach a lens with mold to your camera, it might contaminate all of your gear. To protect against contamination, Zeiss only allows lenses without mold into its service centres. [p.85, c't Digitale Fotografie 04/2013]


3

I recently saw on YouTube - BTW an interesting place for instructions and answers - that you should never store cameras or lenses in camera bags. The fabric in the bag is a great place for mold spores to get imbedded. So dark, moist places surrounded by lower grade of fabric invites disaster. It was suggested when cameras and lenses not in use to put them ...


3

Fungus spores are everywhere. They land, and if conditions are decent, they germinate. The result is a colony of fungi. The secretions are acid and thus corrosive. Favorable conditions are present if the humidity is 70% or higher. Cameras often are associated with leather trim and leather cases. The interior of lens barrels contain lubricants that are ...


3

If the soft white dots have tiny little tendrils coming from them it's probably, fungus or pollen. Here's my suspicions...


3

When a lens is specified as "weather sealed" it means that the lens will be somewhat resistant to external sources of things such as water and dust only when both the lens and camera are "weather sealed" and the lens is attached to the camera. "Weather resistant" never means "water proof" or "hermetically sealed." If a camera or lens is actually airtight, ...


2

Ad 1a : What kind of "food" does it find in a glass element? Dust. There is dust inside your lenses. It's almost never visible on the photos, sometimes you can see some of it by shining flashlight from the other side, but the dust is there. Some of it is biological (including fungi spores) and this is what fungus eats. This is why it's so important to ...


2

As jrista said, almost any lens can be fixed, but you have to compare the cost of repair against the value of the lens. Nikon will often charge over $200 for repairs, but you can probably get a lens cleaned in most parts of the world for $50-100. You have to weigh that cost vs the cost of the lens. Repair or cleaning might cost most of the value of a kit ...


2

The photograph looks like dust, but if you say it looks like snowflakes then yes, that is a fungus. See http://forum.mflenses.com/fungus-on-lens-t1301,start,105.html for examples and send that lens back/complain!


2

The problem of fungus is not specific to a single model or brand of camera. It will happen to lenses or cameras regardless of whether it's Nikon or bridge or a dSLR lens. Whatever camera you buy, if you're living in a warm humid environment, will be vulnerable to it, and yes, fungus damage can easily total a camera let alone cost more than a repair. Fungus ...


2

That certainly does look like some sort of mold or fungus. It may be affecting the image quality, but if you can prevent it from spreading you may be able to use it indefinitely. more: why does fungus form in lenses and how to get rid of it


2

At the time when I got fungus on my lenses and camera sensor, I was actively using all of them in bright sunny environments. The humidity in the region was heavy, and so was the fungus growth. The suggestion that you need sunlight into the lens is just a hearsay. It just something people heard somewhere and they repeat it. Scientifically, fungus is ...


2

it would make sense for front/rear lens caps and body caps to be made transparent. I think the main reason is probably that clear plastics like ABS tend to crack and turn yellow with exposure to UV light, whereas black versions are UV resistant. Experience seems to bear this out: I have some lenses from the early 70's that have original caps, and they're ...


2

Lens caps aren't transparent because it would look terrible.


2

There is a method, with formaldehyde gas. But formaldehyde is very very toxic and harmful. (first, read this Formaldehyde TEACH Chemical Summary) It's used for sterilization of surgical and veterinary instruments. You must use it so far away of humans and pets that you can (above all, of children and pregnants). And always somewhere outdoors, with a ...


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