33

You're right that the angle of view of the iPhone camera is a little bit wider than a 35mm lens on a full-frame film camera. Up until this point, you're not really confused. But the part after that, about the small room and zoom and distance — definitely confused. :) "Zoom" means the ability to change the field of view — it isn't magnification. See What is ...


22

That's not correct. Look at this picture: The green rectangle is a 36x24 sensor. The green circle, which has a diameter of 43.3mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. The blue square is 36x36 sensor. The blue circle, which has a diameter of 50.9mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. As you can see a lens suitable for 36x24 does not ...


21

The size of the sensor does not matter, it is the size of the pixel. Having that said, bigger sensors like in full frame cameras tend to have bigger pixels. You can estimate the size of the pixel by taking the size of the sensor and divide it by the number of pixels. This calculation is not accurate because most sensors have gaps between the pixels and ...


15

EV is a measure of illuminance, which is defined in the link you provided as "luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area". You are correct in stating that when if you keep field of view, depth of field and subject brightness constant: Ev_crop = Ev_ff x c² however since: Area_crop = Area_ff / c² and Light(total) = EV x Area we arrive at ...


15

When I started photography, this one took me ages to figure out, because people tend to explain it with a lot of math, or in a way that makes sense once you already grasp the principle but not before. How does crop factor affect perspective? It doesn't. Not at all, in the slightest. The only way you change perspective is to move the camera. Changing ...


15

The first mainstream applications for electronic image sensors (be it Image-Orthicons, Vidicons, Plumbicons, or CCDs, or CMOS active pixel sensors, be it analog-electronic or digital workflows) were in video, not in still images. Video followed form factors similar to movie film. In movie film, 35mm (equivalent to full frame still) or even 70mm were ...


14

When Canon released the first 1D, APS-H was simply the largest sensor they could get away with, economically. They followed it up with the 1Ds which was full frame. However the 1Ds was slower than the 1D, and offered less reach with telephoto lenses, so was less popular with sports and wildlife photographers. For this reason Canon chose to continue offering ...


14

Essentially, your argument is correct as long as you understand that negligible and high-price are relative terms. You are correct that you get one or at most two stops advantage between a full-frame and an APS-C sensor of the same generation. More importantly so, the advantage is lower at low ISO sensitivities with modern cameras which are essentially ...


14

The Nikon D5 and its predecessors are mainly intended for action and sports photographers. They are designed for speed and sensitivity in order to freeze fast moving action and capture it at its height. This is the main reason why these models traditionally offer fewer megapixels. This lets the camera shoot faster, have better throughput and fit more images ...


13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white square near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-...


12

The original link is actually my article and lens. I shaved the petals off the lens because I didn't want them to show up in the full frame camera images. Although I already have the 16mm fisheye, the 10mm shaved is a totally different look and although you don't get a full circle, it's better than spending more money for a new lens. I wasn't concerned ...


12

The zoom helps with crop sensors but that's not the main reason. Basically on a full frame sensor the 8-15 is two lenses in one, at 8mm it's a full fisheye with a circular image and a 180 degree vertical field of view. At 15mm it's a diagonal  fisheye, with 180 degrees corner to corner and no black areas. Even if you don't want to shoot circular ...


12

Based on the specs the 6D has a smaller lighter body better AF system WIFI and GPS built it slightly better screen and more recent UI SD card slot instead of CF (users may have a preference, or a collection of cards already) The 5D mkII has magic lantern firmware option lower price CF card slot is available now plus a host of lesser differences, e.g. ...


12

The largest CMOS sensors available commercially for photography are "medium format" and measure about 44mm x 33mm. CCDs exist in slightly larger sizes up to 54mm x 40mm. Larger sensors for scientific applications may have been produced. Sensors are produced by projecting a mask onto a large wafer of silicon using UV light. The wafer is then cut into ...


12

When you need to. That is the one and only time you need to think about it. If the answer to one or more of these questions is a Yes, then you may want to consider an upgrade... Do you need a shallower depth of field? Do you need a bazillion megapixels? Do you want to use old or specific lenses that require full frame? Is your viewfinder too small? ...


11

Your 200mm will still be a 200mm. It will project the same image on the sensor. In DX mode, all that will happen is the camera will throw away the outer areas of that captured image and retain what would have fallen on a DX sensor. This is something you can do yourself in post-processing, so I don't think there is much benefit (apart from smaller file ...


11

Without wanting to seem too harsh: if you don't understand the differences between those cameras, you're probably not ready to buy one. More generally, if you put similar format cameras if you put them on a tripod and take measure the results very carefully, you can tell the difference between the photos; this is exactly what DxOMark do - but in the vast ...


10

Since this question was originally asked, the Micro Four-Thirds system has advanced and some of the earlier answers have become outdated. The latest generation of cameras has fast auto-focus although they still lag behind DSLRs for low-light and continuous tracking (eg birds in flight and sports) due to lack of phase-contrast autofocus. The lens selection is ...


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


10

Ignoring for the moment aspect ratio, from a theoretical viewpoint there is will be no visual difference, provided you maintain the same subject & camera position / orientation the same angle of view the same resolution (number of megapixels) the same size entrance pupil (focal length divided by f-number) the same lens characteristics The first two are ...


10

I would choose the 7D for a few reasons: The effective maximum aperture of the 5D Mark II combo will be f/5.6 X 1.4 = 7.84, nearly f/8. This will somewhat cancel out the light-gathering advantage of the full frame camera. You will still have a bit less effective reach with the full-frame camera, even considering the small pixel-count difference and even ...


10

In the "Canon's Full-Frame CMOS Sensors" whitepaper, dated August 2006, you can read the following, which kind of answers your question, although the manufacturing technology and the costs have probably changed to some degree since 2006: Thin disks of silicon called “wafers” are used as the raw material of semiconductor manufacturing. Depending upon its ...


10

Nikon 1.5X APS-C sensors in their current lineup are actually 1.52-1.53X depending on the exact measurements of the various different sensors in different models. Some older, discontinued models in the D3x00 series are slightly smaller at 1.55-1.56X. The difference between 1.52X and 1.53X is 0.65789 percent. The difference between 1.5X and 1.53X is a mere ...


9

The MP-E 65mm is not a normal macro lens, it's a special lens for extreme macro only. If you need 5x magnification the MP-E 65mm is the only option on the market - so it's obviously better than the other options (well, you can potentially get 5x with extension rings or reversed lenses but the MP-E is the only lens that is designed to work at those extreme ...


9

The amount of light passed through the lens stays the same, the lens will still be a F/2.8 lens. Since the smaller sensor only crops out a different area from the illuminated circle, the exposure related properties of the image taking process will stay the same, regardless of the crop-factor.


9

Is it possible and why it has not been done yet ? Not necessarily. A 24x36mm sensor will easily fit in an image circle that's too small for a 36x36mm sensor. Specifically, a 24x36mm sensor requires a minimum diameter of about 44mm to cover the sensor. A 36x36mm sensor would require an image circle of about 51mm diameter. A square sensor is certainly ...


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