22

It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


18

As you can see in the image below from the service manual, the volume behind these two features is occupied by the view finder assembly. Image source: manualslib.com Image source: manualslib.com The round hole is for one of the two optical paths of the range finder optics. The white rectangle is used as a light source for the frame line indications inside ...


14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


13

FujiFilm charges more for lenses (than Canon) because they can. FujiFilm has a near monopoly on X-mount lenses. Other options include cheap manual lenses and expensive Zeiss lenses. This is changing somewhat with the introduction of Viltrox autofocus lenses. Image quality of FujiFilm lenses is nearly guaranteed to be very good. Even XC lenses perform above ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


7

I ran a few more tests. Here are the results: No change to sensor: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks (similar to the top speck in the sample pictures) f/10, 2.0", ISO 200 White specks (similar to the bottom speck in the sample pictures) Manual sensor cleaning: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks in the exact same location, but smaller f/10, 1.8", ISO ...


6

You do not ever want to change the make and model of a raw file such as a .RAF (or .NEF/.CR2/3). Without this data, Lightroom (and other raw file processors) are unable to determine the proper way of rendering the image. This is covered in exiftool FAQ #8. The Make and Model tags are used by some image utilities (including ExifTool) to determine the ...


6

A lens cap or cover is hardly necessary. Minor scratches won't really affect your image quality (LensRentals 1 & 2). What a lens cap does do is protect the lens in transit so that you can instantly take a shot - no accidental finger prints or dirt smudged while en route. That being said, the lens appears to be recessed, making the accidental finger ...


5

First important lesson: these automated comparison sites are terrible. They emphasize things which just aren't important and make them sound like a big deal. You say: XT 10 has a bigger pixel area which is one of the reasons I want to switch from D3200 as it has a small sensor pixel area I see that the site lists "49% larger pixel area" as an advantage. ...


5

Most of the lower priced Canon lenses are older designs that have long since sold enough copies to recover the R&D cost for Canon. Canon introduced the EF mount in 1987 and many of the current consumer grade lenses trace their lineage back to the early or mid 1990s. The newer Canon lenses in that price range are, for the most part, slight revisions of ...


4

If the film advanced and you heard the shutter fire, there's a good chance you captured something. Based on info mattdm provides, the film may be under or over exposed, depending on whether photos were taken indoors or out, because of the fixed shutter speed. You can try using the camera while examining the shutter to see what happens. Consider taking the ...


4

It looks to my eye like the negatives may have been significantly underexposed or underdeveloped. This resulted in negatives with very little density (they're almost transparent). Then when the negatives were scanned and reversed to give a positive image the lab applied a lot of gain to try and draw something out of the very dark images. Green tint is a ...


3

Most of the frames you show look underexposed. But there are some that look like they might be okay. Can you explain in detail how you arrived at the camera settings you used? A properly functioning AE-1 on full auto shouldn't produce such underexposed negatives. Were you using Aperture priority with F22? Did you have it in manual mode and ignore the meter? ...


3

The settings to choose for the focus assist will depend a lot on the scene and photography conditions, as well as personal preferences, to be not too distracting but still easy enough to see where the focus is. I have found cyan to be most suitable for me most of the time, with no clear preference over high/low. In most conditions the focus plane is ...


3

Page 21 of your Owners Manual says “The DISP/BACK button controls the display of indicators in the viewfinder and LCD monitor” It also says that Dual Display only works in Manual Focus mode.


3

There is no real "DPI" in a photo. Inches of what? If it's a macro photography you can have tens of thousands of pixels for one inch of real life object, while pixels in Hubble images can be megaparsecs apart. Which is why cameras don't set the print definition in their JPEGs (when you see 72DPI it is just a default value, that corresponds to the definition ...


3

It took me almost 4 years to come to the following conclusion: It is a camera issue (or rather a camera model issue) and it definitely isn't rare. Many reviewers call it erratic autfocus or just autofocus issues. Looking closely at the pictures reveals that even seemingly focused ones while fitted to screen ("in the print size") are slightly out-of-focus ...


3

The subject is in complete darkness, so a long exposure (1 or 2 seconds) combined with a bit of camera wobble makes the lights in the picture leave trails like that but you don't get a blurry subject. Combine that with a camera flash (1/1000s maybe?) which illuminates the subject and there you have it. (the flash also dimly illuminates the objects in the ...


3

Nikon F-mount lenses can be adapted to FujiFilm X-mount. They can be divided into three categories. Lenses with aperture ring. These can be used with any NF-FX adapter. Lenses without aperture ring, but with mechanical aperture linkage. (G) The aperture on these lenses can be controlled with aperture control rings on appropriately designed adapters. Lenses ...


3

Appears to me that the rollers that crush the developer pod and distribute the developer as the film is being ejected are either misaligned or the film pack isn't seated properly. Pull the pack and make sure all of the rollers are moving freely and that there isn't any crud on them or in the film path...


2

Either of these cameras would make a good choice. Choosing between them probably depends more on your specific shooting preferences. I have the X100F and have been using it for over a year in street photography and I love it, but as with any camera it's not perfect. The X100F is the latest in the X100 series so it has been refined a lot and it is so good ...


2

... small sensor pixel area and the reason I got the 35mm lens... It seems you are confusing "pixel area" with "small sensor". Pixel area is associated with pixel density and does not affect the focal length required to frame your subject. Sensor size does change field of view and framing. FujiFilm X-series cameras and your current Nikon DSLR share the same ...


2

Focus peak highlight enhances areas of high contrast with blue, red, or white. The intensity of the enhancement is associated with the amount of contrast. Low requires higher contrast to enhance. High requires less contrast to enhance. To obtain critically sharp images, use the Low setting along with a color that contrasts with the scene. Red has worked well ...


2

I wonder what is the purpose of the metal grid structure outside of the lens, for example, in the Fuji GX617. When you put a set of human hands in the same frame with a GX617, it becomes more apparent just how large the GX617 is. The cages on the lenses are there for protection of those somewhat skinny lenses that extend fairly far out of the large camera ...


2

Adapters to use mirrorless-system lenses on other camera bodies generally don't exist for the following reasons: Incompatible flange focal distance. With a few exceptions, FFD of lens must be longer than the FFD of the body. Electronic control of lens aperture and focus. Lens would be unusable with a "dumb" adapter. Insufficient benefit (quality, cost ...


2

It all really depends on what kind of photography you want to do. The good news is both lenses are the XF line, so you get the better quality in the Fuji line. (vs XC lenses) Obviously, the 16mm is a prime, so you are 'stuck' with 16mm (24mm full frame equiv). This is rather wide, and likely great for landscapes, but limited for portrait, sports, etc. The ...


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