22

One way is to simply use manual focus. Since the landscape is very distant, there is only one thing to focus on once, then you frame and shoot multiple pictures as you like.


20

There are (at least) four ways to do this: Use manual focus: This is (one of the reasons) why good cameras still have that feature. For this specific scene, there are other ways to achieve equivalent results, but there are situations (such as trying to shoot wildlife photos with grass or tree branches in the foreground) where manual focus is pretty much ...


11

You need to use the exposure lock feature of the camera and a technique called focus/recompose: point the camera at the background half-press the shutter button to lock focus continuing to hold the shutter button halfway down, point the camera back at your subject press the shutter button all the way down to take the shot You can configure the camera to ...


6

The Fuji X100T is a fixed lens camera. Like most such camera, it has a macro mode. That mode only affects autofocus. It allows it to consider closer distances than it would do otherwise, down to the lens minimum of 10cm and up to 2m. Otherwise the camera will focus between 50cm and infinity. This lets it focus quicker in each case it it has a restricted ...


4

There is a small black slider on the side opposite the camera grip. It has 3 positions. If you slide it to the bottom it will be in AF-S mode which stops focusing as soon as autofocus locks after you press the shutter-release halfway. It is hard to see but that is number 20 in the diagram below: It sounds like your camera has the switch in the middle which ...


4

The basic answer here is that you don't have the right tool for the job. Your camera has a fixed wide-angle lens. As you can see from What focal length lens do I need for photographing the moon?, even the supermoon is going to be very small in the frame. In fact, I have the Fujifilm X-T10 and the 23mm lens — a very close cousin of the one built into your ...


3

Yes, it's fine. Any camera can be a fine starting place, but I think it's nice to start one with relatively advanced controls (see Are there disadvantages to a prosumer camera for a beginner, aside from cost?). The X100 isn't terribly complicated, but it hits the important thing right on the head: direct access to individual dials for aperture and shutter ...


3

You can turn the overlay on and off with the DISP/BACK button (page 21 of the manual). You can customize what's shown in the overlay (pg. 75) with DISP.CUSTOM SETTING, and that includes the framing grid. I should also caution you against wearing polarized sunglasses and shooting in portrait mode, which is the way I managed to inadvertently make the overlay ...


3

There is no real "DPI" in a photo. Inches of what? If it's a macro photography you can have tens of thousands of pixels for one inch of real life object, while pixels in Hubble images can be megaparsecs apart. Which is why cameras don't set the print definition in their JPEGs (when you see 72DPI it is just a default value, that corresponds to the definition ...


2

From Using the Flash in the FujiFilm X100F Manual: Sync Choose whether the flash is timed to fire immediately after the shutter opens (1ST CURTAIN) or immediately before it closes (2ND CURTAIN). 1ST CURTAIN is recommended in most circumstances.


2

Recent Fujifilm cameras use a hybrid Phase-Detect and Contrast-Detect AF system. What you are seeing is the Contrast-Detect loop which causes the lens to move back and forth in order to confirm the distance of highest contrast. If there is a stronger flickering indoors it could be due to the cycling of lights, mostly fluorescent that go on and off at 60 or ...


2

Sorry, but no, not directly - but you can try free beta of FastRawViewer, http://www.fastrawviewer.com/ and send the selected ones to Photoshop.


2

It sounds like everything on your camera is working except the sensor. For whatever reason the sensor seems to be outputting no image signal. You probably need to have a camera repair shop look at it and see if it can be repaired for less than the value of the camera. If the camera is new enough that it is still under warranty, you need to contact Fuji ...


2

It's a good choice, but an eccentric one. I'd highly recommend getting your hands on the camera by either borrowing or renting one before purchasing, because the reality of the camera in your hands for a week should decide you either way. I knew an X100S was a really bad fit for me, and a week's rental had me saving up for the X100T. :) However. I am also ...


2

The 600EX-RT doesn't have a built-in dumb optical slave, it only understands the Canon wireless communication systems (optical and radio), which the Fuji doesn't speak. However, you could stick a dumb optical slave (such as the green-based Sonia optical triggers) on the PC port of the 600EX-RT, and trigger the flash manual-fashion if the Fuji's pop-up flash ...


2

You can buy cheap flash triggers that will trigger a flashgun via a PC cable or hotshoe adaptor. They just look for a flash of light, then trigger the connected flash. May be enough for you if you're using the Speedlite in manual mode and the Fuji is only generating one flash (any pre-flashes for red-eye reduction, or ettl metering would need to be disabled) ...


2

Unless Fuji, the manufacturer of the X100, publishes such a specification I doubt there is any reliable way to estimate the expected shutter life of the leaf shutter on the X100 unless you are willing to buy a large sample of X100 cameras and do the testing yourself. I am aware of no independent review/testing organization that publicly publishes results ...


1

There is NOT vignetting based on the center having a slightly longer exposure! Leaf shutters are positioned very near the aperture of the lens, such that inefficiencies created by non-instantaneous opening and closing cause aperture weirdness, not vignetting. So you get a little bit of f4 mixed in with your f2.8. And half as much f5.6. and so on. May be ...


1

There can be visible differences between a leaf shutter and a focal plane shutter when the slit of the focal plane shutter is small compared to the picture and something in the scene is moving fast. Basically, motion blur at short shutter speeds will look different. Imagine a car zipping thru the frame horizontally, and a focal plane shutter traveling ...


1

A quick update, after sending the camera to be repaired: the main PWB had to be changed. It was about 100 $.


1

In the Fuji X100 line, the main purpose of Macro mode is to switch you to the electronic viewfinder, rather than the optical one. Basically, you can't use the optical viewfinder on macro shots without misframing, due to the parallax caused by the viewfinder being offset from the main image-taking lens. At macro distances, the brightline shift in the OVF ...


1

"The Fuji X100t disables the flash when bracketing is enabled. This seems logical for things like ISO bracketing because several photo's are taken in quick succession. ... an oversight in the firmware?" 1: They don't want to put in a fast flash to keep up with the frame rate or risk shot-to-shot inconsistencies. 2: Probably, but there's a workaround. ...


1

It sounds like your options are limited with the X100S. For example, this post suggests that the X100S is not RR-80 compatible, and that your only option is a mechanical cable release. There is some speculation on the web about X100S having the ability to release the shutter through a mic input. This user seems to believe that the RR-90 Remote Release ...


1

Hey guys & X100T fans, I've triggered my Canon 580ex flash with my Fuji X100T using a PocketWizard setup. No it will not do any TTL triggering but I shoot manual anyway and don't need TTL control when I'm shooting with the Fuji. The center pin on the X100t should trigger most wireless flash transmitters properly. Best!


1

Doubtful. Canon's flash system uses a special set of pulses to communicate flash power information and sync details to the flashes in the system. It is unlikely that your Fuji camera implements support for this protocol and without that support, you can't remotely fire the 600EX-RT. There are other third party speedlights and strobes that you can get ...


1

It doesn't sound like you have done very extensive testing yet to see if you can determine if the camera is working as it should on your own. I would try this before sending it in as it may save you the trouble. See: How can I test whether my camera is working after it was dropped? What should I look out for when buying a second-hand DSLR body? How can I ...


1

This is not possible, on the X100s or on any newer Fujifilm X camera I'm aware of (as of early 2017, at least). On models with front and back command dials, you can swap their functions — but not the direction in which they operate.


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