22

It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


8

I ran a few more tests. Here are the results: No change to sensor: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks (similar to the top speck in the sample pictures) f/10, 2.0", ISO 200 White specks (similar to the bottom speck in the sample pictures) Manual sensor cleaning: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks in the exact same location, but smaller f/10, 1.8", ISO ...


7

The photo looks like I did not focus properly. However how can I focus if the stars are indefinitely far away from us? Indeed. For stars, you need to manually focus. How to do it with a modern DSLR / MILC: First, find some very bright star Select the live view mode Aim the camera at the very bright star Zoom in the live view (not the lens!) as much as ...


5

Take a picture of your left hand. Yes, really. Before you bracket you take a picture of your left hand indicating the number of shots that will be in the bracketing series. What if it's more than 5 shots? Well, use the fist as one number, open back hand as one, open palm as one, take a picture of your feet. It's all up to you. Just don't unzip to make 6. ...


5

Everything should be set to manual, nothing should be automatic. What's happening is the camera is trying to compensate/adjust for each and every frame. Turn off any setting that would automatically adjust anything. I made one once, I thought I had everything set correctly and when I rendered it to video it did the same light variance/flickering that you ...


4

Focus assist should be available when pressing the button on the rear command dial. Focus Zoom If ON is selected for AF/MF SETTING > FOCUS CHECK, the camera will automatically zoom in on the selected focus area when the focus ring is rotated. If STANDARD or FOCUS PEAK HIGHLIGHT is selected for AF/MF SETTING > MF ASSIST, zoom can be adjusted by ...


4

What you are seeing is the result of dust on your sensor, not on the lens. Most modern Digital SLR and mirrorless cameras have a sensor self cleaning mode. Check your manual for instructions on how to use the self cleaning system, or how to manually clean the sensor yourself using a blower or other methods. You can also have a camera shop clean your ...


4

You must have been on fully automatic exposure mode (both speed and aperture set to automatic). With f/5.6, the -2 EV image would have had to be exposed for 1/35 sec. and the camera's logic decided that that was too long (as it would have a high chance to be shaky). So it decided to open up the aperture instead. As you feared, this is generally not ...


3

The settings to choose for the focus assist will depend a lot on the scene and photography conditions, as well as personal preferences, to be not too distracting but still easy enough to see where the focus is. I have found cyan to be most suitable for me most of the time, with no clear preference over high/low. In most conditions the focus plane is ...


3

I've found that changing the bracketing pattern from 0, -, + (which is what most cameras seem to use by default) to -, 0, + helps me to more easily identify bracketed sequences when looking at thumbnails or "filmstrips" at the bottom of the screen when reviewing images. The brightest "+" image is almost always the most easily recognizable one and marks the ...


3

In addition to all the other great answers I'd like to add that the Fuji x-trans sensor used in your cameras has been known to not really meet the ISO standard. Here is an excerpt from DPReview's review of the Fuji X-T1 (which also uses an x-trans sensor): By our tests, the X-T1's measured sensitivities are around 1/2 - 2/3EV lower than marked, which is ...


2

There are at least two likely sources that are contributing to the variation you see. The light coming in your window could be variable if the atmospheric conditions at your location are changing between the two shots. Clouds moving across the sky, for instance, can significantly influence both the brightness and the color of sunlight coming through a ...


2

Your Canon has not exactly the same configuration. I suspect it to have the auto lightning optimizer on. You have the possible magnitudes: off/low/standard/high. And by default it is on standard. Try to set it to off and you should have the same results. Try also to set the white balance to manual and to the same tuning, so you can have closest colors. You ...


2

There is only so much you can do in the middle of the day when the sun is so bright and the shadows so deep. Go back just before sunrise and watch the place as the sun comes up, return just before twilight and watch as the lighting changes as the sun sets. You may need to visit it several times as atmospheric conditions can be vastly different form day to ...


2

Fuji and Capture one have a really nice feature in version 12 that lets Capture one start with editing your RAW with the film simulation option you set in camera. That is why the RAW image in capture one is showing as B&W right from import. You can override this. On the "Colour" tool tab there is a tool window called "Base Characteristics". In that tool ...


2

The "Resolution" in this case has no effect on the exported quality. If you intend to print, you could set this to the DPI of the printer, which could help making it easier later to get the size right when printing later. The important option here is the "Scale" which you have currently set to Fixed: 100% - That means that the output will be the exact same ...


2

Focus peak highlight enhances areas of high contrast with blue, red, or white. The intensity of the enhancement is associated with the amount of contrast. Low requires higher contrast to enhance. High requires less contrast to enhance. To obtain critically sharp images, use the Low setting along with a color that contrasts with the scene. Red has worked well ...


2

Remember, this is focus assist, not focus magic. The trick with both of these aids is to remember that it's really the same as getting sharpness right on the screen: as you turn the focus ring, you're moving the plane of focus back and forth, and you want to place it so it coincides with your subject. If you are shooting at wide apertures and want focus to ...


1

What you are trying to do is accomplished by a technique known as bulb ramping, or bramping (see: What is bulb ramping?), where the camera's exposure is gradually changed to accommodate changing lighting conditions. There are several commercial products and open source projects that bulb ramp cameras to create smooth timelapse sequences without jarring ...


1

When you change to a different tool, the part of the image you have selected (that is, the part inside the border box) is expanded to fill the space. The part you have not selected (that is, the part outside the crop you have selected) is no longer shown. If you have not selected a crop, then the camera has done it automatically. Many mirrorless cameras ...


1

Those are defective pixels, specifically "hot pixels", in your image sensor. It's rare for a sensor not to have one or two, unless you pay the big bucks for one that's been carefully inspected. You usually don't see hot pixels in finished published works. Usually software at some level detects these and replaces those pixels with an average of the ...


1

Digital split image appears to use phase-detect pixels in the center of the viewfinder. Align the bands for gross focus. Look for the "shimmer" to fine-tune focus. When active, the focus area is always visible in the center of the display. On older cameras, the focusing area is monochrome. On newer cameras, color is available. There are no focus points to ...


1

Raw is disabled when any one of a number of features is enabled. They include various toy camera modes, extended ISO, and the auto switch. Without detailed settings info, it's impossible to know which feature you've used that has disabled raw. Figure out which features you use that disable raw. Then stop using them.


1

There is no such user-accessible setting, I'm afraid. This goes for higher-end models as well. It's possible that this can be adjusted at the factory — it's worth asking Fujifilm if they can do that. I can see how you find this annoying, but consider that the more aggressive switch means the scene is ready in the EVF without waiting once your eye is closer....


1

The difference you are seeing is likely caused by a combination of effects from using different bodies and lenses. To compare lenses, use the same camera body. To compare camera bodies, use the same lens. Canon and FujiFilm cameras do produce images with slightly different exposures at the same settings. According to the Wikipedia article on Film Speed, ...


1

I'm not sure if this is actually the problem, but this is probably one thing that is affecting the brightness. Try looking at the T-stops of the lenses. (T-stop is like f-stop, but, tells how much light is transmitted through the glass, f-stop only takes into account aperture size). Your zoom lens may let less light through at the same aperture as your ...


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