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21

Awesome question, I am studying for my Private Pilot license and (as a photographer) found the chapter on Weather Theory facinating. Among other things, it gives a very reasonable description on the predictors for fog (and other meteorological events). It describes 4 kinds of fog and when each may/will occur: Radiation Fog: "On clear nights, with ...


20

There are two main elements I see in your example images: Contrast These images have relatively low contrast. The brightest whites are nowhere near pure white. They're light grey. The darkest blacks are nowhere near pure black. They're dark grey. You can do this by reducing overall contrast, by lightening up the shadows (also known as reducing the blacks, ...


10

There are two distinct characteristics that most of these images share - colour palette & 'hazy glow'. Let's tackle them separately. I'm always tempted to think that any edit was done as easily as possible rather than as complicatedly as possible... Comparing the first set of 'Ravenclaw' pictures to the 2nd 'cup' image, the only real shared ...


7

Have you experimented much with photo-editing as yet? Do you know of that infamous 'histogram' that is often spoken about in tutorials, etc? That look you've described above happens when the darks in the histogram aren't quite touching the end of the graph. Using whichever method of editing you find most comfortable, that's what you'd need to achieve. For ...


7

Your options are limited; the fog is an opaque item and post processing can only do so much. You can enhance or reduce the impact of the fog by adjusting contrast. It may or may not help much, it may impact other parts of your image. but effectively, the fog is turning the image into a very low contrast image, so increasing contrast can reduce it's impact. ...


7

You're looking for very humid conditions followed by a (somewhat) rapid cooling, relative to temperature. In practice, Spring and Autumn tend to feature the sorts of temperature swings needed, but fog can obviously occur any time of the year. The humidity needed to form fog will most likely come from recent rainfall, but again, this can vary. A fast ...


6

I check the weather forecast. Of course many people are interested in this information so weather centers predict it. It is especially critical for pilots. Try http://www.intellicast.com/National/Humidity/FOGcast.aspx or similar. They also define it on that very website as "Fog forms when the difference between the air temperature and dewpoint is 5°F (3°...


5

Morning mist tends to form after a rainy day followed by a clear night, and you can also get mist on a hot sunny day following a cold night. You are more likely to see mist around bodies of still water or in river valleys, and can also find it near wet, marshy ground such as fenland.


4

I can provide some answer to this question based on experience, but this type of photography nearly always requires test shots first and a light meter to get the correct effect. As for ratios, I am not really sure if there are any as I generally expose for the background first which is always dependent on the look I am trying to create and then meter for the ...


4

Is this a theatre piece that you are shooting for publicity or documentation? If so, I'd talk to the lighting director and director/choreographer and explain the problem and see if you can arrange a dress rehearsal with more light. You can then either underexpose and/or post-process so the resulting images match the intended lighting effect.


4

The first thing to know about fog is that its effect is more pronounced with distance. The best is to get as close as possible. Do not zoom in, get closer instead. Don't fall into the cliff though! Second is that fog reflects light. Do not flash it. Shoot it from an angle where the fog receives the least light from other sources, such as street lamps. ...


3

Step 1: Duplicate layer As we don't want to do any destructive editing, make sure you duplicate your layer (Layer>Duplicate Layer) and rename it. Quick Selection ToolStep 2: Selection If your foreground detail is out of the fog and it's the background you want to clear up you'll need to do a simple selection so the foreground stays as is. The Quick ...


3

I want to corroborate what chuqui said above and add a bit more detail. Fog works like adding white to all pixels, and it reduces both your sharpness and contrast. Any algorithm that tackles one of these two can be helpful to you. The classics are overall contrast, unsharp mask (try a large radius then a small one) and smart sharpen. But there are also more ...


3

I don't recommend using a white balance tool in this case. That would result in altering the gray fog to the correct color, but it will also bring out the blue in the sky, which you don't want. So I'm going to suggest using a levels tool. Many applications have this and it's really easy to use once you know how. In this example I used Pixlr, which is ...


3

There are some sets of conditions that are just extremely difficult to shoot in. Low light with moving scenery and people is such a set. My normal advice would be to bring your own light (e.g. an off camera flash) but with a stage full of fog that probably isn't going to work. In any case you are going to get some softness just from shooting through the fog. ...


2

You could use a number of different things to produce effects similar to fog. A number of pyrotechnics are available to produce large amounts of smoke. (Legality may vary depending on where you live) In addition, if you are trying to save money, there are many home-brew versions of fog machines available for you to simply make yourself. Depending on the ...


2

You could try increasing the white point in the highlights of the image. That should keep the darker parts dark while making the white brighter. The same thing could also be accomplished using curves and pulling up the brighter side while keeping the darker side linear. If you shot raw, you might also try increasing the exposure and then increasing the ...


2

To do this professionally: You need to have a special piece of equipment called a lens test projector. You can take it to a good camera rental house and ask them to do you a favor and check the lens. Or mail it in to get repair, $$. To do this on the cheap and not very scientifically: If you have a magnifying glass or good eyes a close visual ...


1

It is not exactly matching the examples you provide, but the original cold/bluish look is a wet photography process called a Cyanotype. You'll be familiar with it from 'blueprints' but it was also used for printing photographs. You can find various tutorials, filters and Photoshop action which include Cyanotype in their description. For example this one ...


1

Either in the camera itself, or using post-processing software such as Lightroom, you can change the 'temperature' of the colors of the picture by changing a setting called White Balance. You can there choose to have the colors be more bluish.


1

The answer provided by @cliffclos seems to be very good, but I also want to add some ideas. First off, you could just ask camera repair centers, how much the check would cost. I don't think the simple check would be very expensive. Also, for camera lenses that I buy, I like to open the aperture up and just look through the lens, preferrably against the ...


1

I don't think your camera settings can do much about it. Changing the way to take this photograph will influence both the foggy area, but also the much clearer area you see closer to you. Make sure not to zoom as posted by Itai is good advice, every meter between you and the subject contains fog, zooming will not fix that. In Lightroom I use a Graduated ...


1

You can improve the image you capture by upwards of 1% (very nearly 2%) in quality by using a polarizer if there is fog without much overcast, and perhaps by an additional 0.05% using an enhancing filter to cut the excess blue a bit. Anything more than that means shooting in the weather you wished were happening at the time - trying again another day, or ...


1

Well, if you do not see it on the films directly... It is not X-ray :-) You might have some dirt in the film scanner. Also, if it was X-ray, you would see it periodically on the film, with possibly a bit decreasing intensity towards the end of the film. And finally, try to view the film in a sharp angle. Is there something on it that reflects the light a ...


1

Even if you are not shooting in RAW, you can still use PS Camera Raw to edit the files. Simply go to File -> Open as... and choose camera raw format, then open your jpegs. ACR should give you plenty of options to deal with the fog :) As Bart pointed out correctly, this does not answer the question on how to make the fog whiter, just points towards a ...


1

If you live in a town that has a film industry, check the local lighting rental companies. Some of them have a device that can produce a lot of smoke for outdoors. There is the gas powered variant, but then there is also the fuel powered variant which is more fun. It looks like a weapon from MIB. It's also really loud, but very effective. A cheaper ...


1

I think it is a 2 step problem. 1) Focus. One option is to get a flash with autofocus asist light. But you need to find a model suitable to your camera. Some models can block the flash, and fire just the asist light. Of course you can not fire this when someone is actually shooting the film. So the other option you have is to practice and practice a lot. ...


1

I've been dealing with this too filming DJ's. I've found if you have a good backlight to silhoutte them it can look pretty cool. Also sometimes overexposing a little and then using vibrance, contrast and black level settings in the PS camera raw filter can cut through the fog. Using a constant light will just show more fog


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