4

Actually, the focus points that are displayed in the viewfinder are only a somewhat rough approximation of where the actual focus points in the guts of the camera are located and how big they are. Consider it as the camera telling you that "focusing will be done somewhere in the vicinity of this bright red square thingy" and you get the right idea. So I'd ...


4

It's worth noting that even the focus point LEDs can be off the mark and may not accurately show where the focus really is. Knowing this, you can see why it'd be hard to say what problems a misalignment of focus screen and point indicators will give. Most likely, if there is any issue, it'd be that the focus point you're expecting to be in sharp focus is ...


3

When using single point focus, you need to line up your subject and focus point selection for focusing, so the information on selected focus point location is useful even before auto focus has not yet been activated. Thus, on a D7100, the focus point is always displayed in single point mode. This is indeed different from dynamic AF area modes, where the ...


2

This information is stored in the maker notes section of the EXIF data. As this section's content is company (and probably model) dependant, proprietary, and undocumented, it isn't surprising that lightroom does not try to interpret it, and subsequently doesn't store it in the jpeg. If you create the jpeg with your camera's proprietary software and import ...


2

The only downside might be that you might get a little more glare/light bleed from it bouncing off the focus screen and if shooting in low light, it might have more of an impact on your night vision. It's entirely a user preference thing though, there isn't really any advantage or disadvantage beyond using it the way you like.


2

That's a new one on me. But no, the battery life won't be noticeably shorter in standard use (via a quick search for "LED power drain") and LEDs like that will outlast the camera body (unless you start spending 100's on repairs to other parts of the body). You personally could experience a slight loss of night vision if you're looking at the night sky or ...


2

According to the manual of your camera (page 222), AF point illumination is controlled by custom setting a4. It can be set to On, Off or Auto. When set to Auto, the camera decides whether it needs to illuminate points based on the light levels. It will only briefly illuminate the markings on a half-press of the shutter.


1

Many EOS cameras have a menu or custom function option regarding when AF points light up in the viewfinder and when they don't. The default setting is "automatic", which means they light up in darker situations and don't light up in brighter situations. The other two options are normally "always on" and "always off". It may be possible you've changed this ...


1

First of all: I would not be worried of other focus indicators being lit slightly, it's probably normal. As long as you can distiguish each focus point indicator I see no need to take it to the service center. I guess you refer to the effect in the following picture, observed in the viewfinder of a Nikon F100: The photo was indirectly taken via the mirror ...


1

I think ths is right-on with the suggestion of copying the MakerNotes with exiftool. To do this: exiftool -tagsfromfile rawfile.cr2 -makernotes output.jpg which should work. (I've tested it with Pentax RAW files but not with Canon.) Further, finding a plugin that includes the MakerNotes in the exported JPEGs should do the trick as well. Several people ...


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