11

"LEDs have a general life expectancy of 50 000 hrs." Source: http://www.electronicsweekly.com/blogs/led-lights/2009/02/led-life-expectancy.html Let's say (for simplicity) that the light is on for 3.6 seconds each time, which is 1/1000 of an hour. That would give that the LED should last for about 50 000 000 exposures. As a comparison, if your batteries ...


8

That is an auto-focus assist light shone by another photo camera that is left from the video camera. This link explains how this light works on Nikon DSLR cameras. As far as I know it is similar to other camera and flash brands.


7

No The 600D uses the built in pop-up flash for the focus assist light, the pop-up flash pops up too close the the external flash if one is connected - there are many external flashes and accessories that would be hit by the popup flash if it tried to open when they are connected. So, as a safeguard the camera will not open the popup flash if there is ...


5

They're red LEDs under the cover. I removed the cover from my 430 EX and whilst it works better (with all lenses, on account of producing a brighter, sharper grid pattern) the light is still red. Here's what it looks like without the cover: It's worth noting that you can in theory remove and replace the cover as necessary but I snapped one off the clips ...


5

The AF-Beam is is used while the camera focuses but before it meters. Otherwise, metering gets affected and significantly so in condition when the AF-Assist beam may help. In any type of Continuous AF this is not usually the case, so , the AF-beam must be turned off. A camera must also be able to keep focusing, so the AF-Assist beam could create a situation ...


4

LEDs usually have a lifetime on the order of tens of thousands of hours or more. The AF assist beam that your camera uses is probably only activated for a fraction of a second with each exposure. Unless you've got a defective LED, it would be very, very surprising if the AF assist beam ever needed replacement -- it should last far longer than other parts ...


4

The 430EX III is a bit "special". Canon builtin flashes optionally use a series of preflashes for focus assist, but Speedlites up until this point have instead only used the (less confusing/irritating) IR focus assist beam. Perhaps as a cost-cutting (or market segmentation) measure, in the 430EX III the IR assist is only available when using the center AF ...


2

I have a NEX-3N. There, when the magnified view is displayed, you can switch between the two magnifications via the button next to the lower right corner of the display (next to it, the magnification you can switch to is displayed, while in the upper left corner you see the current magnification). To complete the answer for others, here's how to enable the ...


2

Two reasons: The narrow infrared beam of the 430EX III limits the usefulness of the IR assist to the center focus point. The IR assist has a more limited range than the brighter pre-flashes. There are also other sources of pre-flashes, even when IR focus assist is selected. The modeling flash feature on many Canon models is one. Using the E-TTL automatic ...


1

Does a near infrared AF assist light work with contrast detect autofocus? The AF assist light is mainly red. Maybe it reaches beyond the visible red spectrum and into near infrared because the filters are cheaply made, but since most cameras have IR-filters, its effect would be negligible.[1] However, I think that for CDAF, a multi-spectrum-light (i.e. ...


1

This is an apparent design flaw. The YN685 is a very inexpensive superficial copy of the Canon 600EX. I wouldn't call it a "clone" as that implies more similarity than actually exists. The Canon 600EX (and prior flashes such as the 580 and 580-II) project a pattern of horizontal bars that provides a good target for the camera focusing mechanism. The YN685'...


1

I use the AF assist beam from my Speedlite, but at the same time I turn flash firing off. This way the subject is in focus and I don't loose the natural light in the room. I also adjust the exposure compensation for a darker image.


1

There are two possible reasons for this. The first, if you mean that you are using a remote trigger with two second delay, is as an indicator that the countdown is running. The second is that it is attempting to provide focus confirmation. Many cameras will still check focus even when in manual focus mode and then provide an indication of which focus ...


1

According to page 33 of the D3200 Reference Manual, the light you see is functioning as the self-timer lamp, not as the AF-assist illuminator. The manual includes no instructions as to how this feature might be disabled. One possible workaround might be to use an MC-DC2 Remote Release Cord (1 Meter) wired cable release instead of the wireless remote.


1

There are certain scenarios when autofocus does not work or determines that there is not enough light to properly focus. These are described in your manual (geometric patterns, subject behind objects (e.g. fence), etc.) Also, certain focus points are only sensitive to one direction, and others (cross type) are sensitive to both directions. If you are using ...


1

Note: I design solar powered LED based lighting products (amongst other things). Manufacturers can be expected to rate such LEDs to last well in excess of the expected life of the camera. LED lifetimes for small LEDs are usually less or MUCH less than the lifetimes quoted for power LEDs for a range of reasons. And manufacturers can choose to drive them ...


1

Longer than you or the camera. Approximate LED life is 50,000 hours. Even if it is 10,000 hours, that is still over 300 photos every day for 80 years using the LED for a few seconds at a time per photo. Note that the LED also is only necessary for photos in relatively dark areas which makes that 300 photos a day number even harder to hit.


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