12

According to this the iPhone SE has an 29mm-equivalent lens, so on a Fuji with a 23.6x15.6 sensor (Fuji XT-3)(crop factor 1.53) you need a 29/1.53=19mm lens for the same field of view.


10

Assuming that the quoted 1365mm focal length is in 35mm full frame equivalent terms (because otherwise, it would be huge), then the actual focal length of the lens assembly is around 1365 / 5.6 ~= 244mm. To accomplish an equivalent 1365mm focal length with a 1.6 crop factor, you would need about an 854mm actual focal length lens. I'm not aware of anything ...


7

In photography, what is interesting is mostly the angle of view (AOV). The AOV is the angle that a lens offers on a sensor - it can be specified horizontally, diagonally, or vertically. AOV [°] = 2 * arctan ( sensor_height|width|diagonale [mm] / (2 * focal_length [mm]) ) The formula to get from a specified focal length (FL) on a non-full-frame sensor to ...


6

Based on others' calculation that you would need approximately an 850mm lens - which is not going to really be in any normal person's budget, nor even really portable - see the humorous article The Question of 18-300mm Lenses, Part Deux to see how big [& expensive, $16,000] the Nikon 800mm is. The article compares it to the 18-300mm lens which ...


6

Photography is not (necessarily) about giving the viewer a "as you would see it"-perspective. Photography is about offering additional perspectives. If this was not true, the only good photos would be with roughly the same angle of view that the human eyes give us, shot at eye-height. This, however, is not true. I would even go as far as to say: Those are ...


5

Cinematography solved this problem long ago with the split diopter. It's literally just half of a screw-on diopter, just like so-called "close up filter" (although it doesn't filter anything, it's called that because it mounts to the lens like other front-mounted actual filters). Split diopters don't see much use in photography, but they used to be used in ...


5

Note: I answered the 'question within the question' rather than the stated title. For the title as it stands [stood, it's now been edited], see What is the difference between a telephoto lens and a zoom lens? At 10 miles across central London, you're not going to get detail, you're going to get lots of blue haze, even on a clear day. I can't see St Paul's ...


5

One thing and one thing only determines perspective: Subject distance. Period. For more please see: Is there a difference between taking a far shot on a 50mm lens and a close shot on a 35mm lens? Does wide angle equivalent in crop sensor skew image? Can a telephoto lens have a wide field of view? How does focal length change perspective? Why is the ...


4

There's nothing wrong with the existing answers - but my thought is that essentially you're going to be learning on the job which is going to bring its own set of issues anyway. I'd say, yes, rent a lens, but don't rent one in the range you already have, unless you've got a fair amount of money to throw at it. You are also going to need some soft ...


4

The formulas don't account for factors that cause real lenses to deviate from the ideal. Formulas are from Wikipedia. Depth of Field – DOF stays the same because distance to subject (u) is in the numerator and focal length (f) is in the denominator. They are both squared, so changes that are proportional to each other cancel out. Here is the standard ...


4

Crop factor is a characteristic of the camera, not the lens. A 50mm lens is 50mm no matter what you attach it to. The bigger or smaller sensor is what leads to crop factor, which is the ratio of the area of a full frame sensor to the area of the sensor in question. Smaller sensors will have a ratio > 1, and medium format sensors (or other larger sensors) ...


4

IMO, a neural net would be overkill for identifying blurred images. Just run an edge detection filter on it. If there are no strong edges anywhere in the frame, then it's blurred.


3

Here is one way to think about this. Suppose we had a view camera (in simple terms - front and back rigid frames with removable boards connected with a bellows) that had three different backs - one for 35mm film, one for 120 film and one for 4x5 film - and was mounted on a sturdy tripod with a 90mm large format lens up front. Then we focus, get an exposure ...


3

The only reason that we even bother with this concept called "crop factor" is because of the absolute prevalence/dominance of 35mm film. Do you think the early shooters, big box view camera's in hand, were conceptualizing their lenses using a crop factor? The focal length of the lens, such as 50mm, is a characteristic of the lens. This is considered the "...


3

'Best' is a subjective term. The cathedral is 365' tall and 518' long. Field of View Calculation You can use a field-of-view calculator (in this case a dimensional field-of-view calculator) such as this one: Photography Calculators For the ten mile distance, I'll just round that to 50,000 feet (it's actually a little longer) and plug in some numbers. ...


3

The eye does not use a projection plane but some sort of spherical projection surface which is converted to 3D in "post production". This 3D conversion even happens (using motion estimation and integration) when looking just with one eye. There are considerably different resolutions in the core viewing area and peripheral vision. In general, it is agreed ...


3

The answer is maybe. It depends on whether the photos have required reference points to make the determination. If the required points exist on the photograph, yes. Verticality (plumb) is established as the line between the zenith (point overhead) and the nadir (centre of the planet). Any eccentricity from that is considered "tilted." The horizon is ...


3

I believe it's just a bad/distorted picture. After correcting the pincushion lens distortion and camera angle (roll/tilt), it appears to me that the tower is straight. The horizontal lines I added reference to things that should be straight/level, and what I corrected for. The vertical lines are perpendicular to reference the straightness/verticality of ...


3

No, not from one picture. It could be tilted towards the camera (or away from it), and there is no way to see it in the shot.


3

I currently own... the Nikon 16-80 mm f/2.8-4E ED VR. I've found it mostly suits my needs... Buying lenses you don't need is an insidious affliction that is best avoided before it begins. So I've started testing out the Nikon 50 mm f/1.8G and although I'm a fan of the results it produces, I'm not sure if I'm just convincing myself they're actually better....


3

What kind of shots do you wish to take that your current lens does not allow? What kind of lens is needed to produce those shots? Until you can answer both of those questions, you don't need to buy anything. For more along these lines, please see: When should I upgrade my camera body? Does the camera matter? The questions and answers hold equally true ...


2

Keeping it simple. YES. Your 30X magnification binoculars are 30X lifesize. In photography, lifesize is 50mm on a full frame camera (35mm or full frame digital). That is the standard. So, 50mm x 30 = 1500mm. Now, if you are using a sub frame (APS-C) digital, you must figure the crop factor. So, 1500mm / 1.6 = 937mm. To get 30x magnification ...


2

Yes, but it depends a lot on the amount of background separation. A less technical explanation is that when you back up in order to create the same subject composition you negate the increased magnification at that distance, but not at the distance of the background (BG) itself. I.e. if your subject is at 10ft and your BG is at 50ft. When you double the FL ...


2

Sure. Happy to oblige. Using trigonometry, the distance can be calculated based on the tangent of the FOV half-angle. I used the diagonal of the sensor aspect ratio that will include the table (14.06' based on Pythagorean triangle proportions) as the triangle base. First, you must fit the subject into the sensor's image field-of-view. The subject is a 6' ...


2

Congratulations — you've invented bifocals! Or, in other words, sure, there's no reason this wouldn't work. The math should be the same as that from using a front-of-the-lens macro adapter. These are usually given in units called "diopters", the same as for glasses or contact lenses. And because they're simple lenses (as opposed to complex or compound ...


2

Camera math provides lots of equivalent ways to solve this optical problem. You know that your heart’s desire is a compact digital crop factor 1.6 (might be 1.5 depending on model). One approach is to find the inverse value of the crop factor and multiply. For a camera crop factor 1.6, the math is 1/1.6 = 0.625. For this format you would search for a 1365 x ...


2

The sensor in the Sony RX10 iv is a one-inch sensor. The "600mm" is actually the "full-frame equivalent" of the 220mm lens you really have. In other words, your 220mm lens produces on your sensor the same framing as a 600mm lens on a bigger (24x36mm) sensor. If you had a true 600mm lens, the camera would be very heavy (several pounds) it would be barely ...


2

Let's use this image from an article in Guardian about the Manhattan Loft Gardens tower violating the London Plan (prohibiting buildings from ruining the view of St. Paul's from several key locations in the city, including from King Henry's Mound) as a reference for measurement: Image from The Guardian, St Paul's not consulted on development that mars ...


2

Theoretically, you might be able to determine the tilt angle. However, more information besides the photos is necessary. You would need to know the exact coordinates of the camera and several other objects in the image (several points along the buildings in the foreground). The next problem is that lenses are not perfectly rectilinear, straight lines will ...


2

I suppose the least lens-distorted rectangular part of a shot is defined by the focal length of lens I'm using, but I'd like to know which part it is exactly, or at least how to calculate that part. I think you really need to start here: What is the difference between perspective distortion and barrel or pincushion distortion? ... because there are ...


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