11

I assume this is a still frame from a video, because 16:9 is a common video ratio. In order to maintain constant frame size, "digital zooming" needs to be reinterpolated. Thus, yes, you need to account for the "zoom ratio" by factoring in 1.4 times the focal length. However, your calculations are off, because a "1/3.1-inch" sensor is not actually 1/3.1" in ...


3

Your rabbit, including ears, takes up roughly 70 vertical pixels out of a total of 1,288 vertical pixels. 80% of 70 is 56 pixels. 56 pixels divided by 1,288 pixels is 1/23 of the image height. You'd need roughly 23 x 50mm, or 1,150mm, to fill the frame with what 56 vertical pixels is currently showing. You might as well round it off to 1,200mm, because ...


1

Some of your intuition is correct: A longer focal-length makes the scene look flatter because when you move away object distances relative to each other are proportionally smaller. Say you are taking a photo of a subject 1m from you with another 2m, the distance of the further one is twice as far. Move yourself 9m further and now you have one object at 10m ...


1

higher focal length affects your image because you have to move further away from your subject. The background will then seem closer to the subject. That's only indirectly true. What you're really describing there is a lens with a narrow field of view (a.k.a., a "telephoto lens.") I also understand that larger sensors require one to get closer to their ...


1

What I understand is that higher focal length affects your image because you have to move further away from your subject. Yes, for the same sensor size. I also understand that larger sensors require one to get closer to their subject in order to fill the frame. No. Unless you use the same focal length. But the overall image perspective depends on a ...


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