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11

Wow, I haven't thought about that stuff in years. Keep in mind what the stopbath and fixer are for. The stop bath has two purposes, to immeditely cease the developing process, and to protect the fixer. The developer is alkaline and the fixer acid. Even just a few drops of developer in the fixer will degrade it much more rapidly than it would get depleted ...


10

Since developers are often alkaline, you could use a red or purple litmus paper to test for that - if it contacts with alkalies, it turns blue.


9

You could try a clearing test. Once you've mixed your mystery powder with water place a small amount in a graduate or glass and then snip a bit of the leader off of a roll of film. If it clears in the solution, then you have fixer. If the film remains opaque then it is probably something else. Your smell test would work as well, btw. Good luck.


7

I highly suggest you check out this book: https://www.amazon.com/Darkroom-Cookbook-Alternative-Process-Photography/dp/1138959189/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=7X28P62RGESTJJRKT4MD The history of film development is a long, experimental one. Even today, people continue to experiment, even using coffee to develop the film (https://...


7

A 35mm film has an image size (exposure area) of 24*36 mm. Generally, you have a 2 mm gap between two consecutive image and about 5 mm on each side for the perforation. As the fixer will react on all the film, all the surface has to been accounted for. The holes should be taken into account too but you probably won't see a difference if you don't. So for ...


6

You can use the same container and mixing utensils and thermometer etc. for mixing. This is valid provided you take care to rinse well between solutions. Also, the items must not be porous (ceramic etc.). If you are in doubt regarding your ability to properly rinse, you can still proceed if containers and utensils are seasoned. To season, save small ...


6

One way to check is to take a small piece of undeveloped film (you can use a bit of film leader) and put it in the suspect fixer (this can be done with the lights on). It should turn transparent in less than 1/2 the recommended fixing time. To turn it on it's head- the fixing time should be at least twice the clearing time (some say 3 times the clearing time)...


5

Photographic chemicals are generally robust however they will lose their effectiveness over time. Exactly how long will be their shelf life is a variable. Developers tend to have the shortest shelf life. This is because the developing agents are relatives of benzene which was initially synthesized from coal. These agents have an affinity for oxygen. They ...


4

The problem with photo chemistry is that it changes and becomes unusable. The rate of change is best controlled by limiting the amount of exposure to air and warmth. Control the air by storing in the smallest bottle needed and making sure it has a good seal. Control for warmth by storing at room temp, or even better, in a fridge. I’d say that, yes, you ...


3

I am not sure if the following works for an actual answer because I figure that it will take an actual chemist or at least a professional photographer that has many years of experience to tell. But since this is too long for a comment, I decided to post it as an attempt to an answer. I tried googling for an answer to this question and the closest ...


3

The stop bath (usually dilute acetic acid or even water) neutralizes the developer and stops the development process almost as soon as the film becomes in contact with the stop bath. There is no point to continuing the stop bath any longer than this, but it will do little harm when development occurs in perfect darkness. When developing with a safelight, ...


2

While you can use the same mixing jug, provided some precautions as Alan Marcus mentions...I'm somewhat confused as to the why of this. Ideally, you've got separate storage containers for your mixed stop, fix, and perma-wash (and photo Flo, if you use it). You can measure your chemicals in your measuring device of choice and then add to your storage ...


2

The column of the table you refer to is titled "Capacity/litre of working strength fixer" so each 1L will process 80 sheets of 20.3x25.4cm paper and 10L will, therefore, process 800 sheets of 20.3x25.4cm paper, etc.


2

I have left paper in fixer for nearly 24 hrs and it does craze (look like fine hairlines running though parts of the image) and some parts, in streaks, did turn a rusty colour.


2

I have left film and paper in fixer for long periods of time (an hour or two) with no discernable effects. You can safely fix for 10-15 minutes if you want. It won't degrade the film, but it shouldn't improve the quality/durability either if you've fixed the recommended time.


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