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1

The bulging front element of your lens makes using filters difficult. To use a filter in front of the lens, you'd need a very large filter or a bowl-shaped filter that curves around the lens. The filters may be expensive, and you would need to find or make a custom holder for your lens. You may have to correct vignetting produced by the filter or crop the ...


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One option is holding the filter in front of the lens using your left hand. Use your right hand to activate the shutter. I heard Pulitzer winner Michael S. Williamson describe the technique once. Particularly useful for graduated ND filters when running and gunning. Square filters are probably easier than round.


11

I read online that diffusion filters do not add data as the entirety of the effect can be recreated in post with more flexibility. Yes and no. But in practice mostly no. Yes, in principle, the effect of a diffusion filter is equivalent to applying some kind of blur to the image in post-processing — most typically gaussian blur, although other kinds of ...


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Diffusion filters cause a portion of the light to refract/bend by creating some kind of obstruction. The amount (percentage) of the light that is scattered is indicated by the filter's strength rating. And because it is a relative amount of scattered light, stronger light sources will show more halation/bloom. There are different ways of causing the effect ...


3

Is this a bad habit, which I need to kick? Consider this: Would you use your camera in all situations where you currently use your camera, if you didn't have UV filters? I do this to protect the glass on the lens from dust, moisture and scratches Strictly speaking, dust is removable with moving air, an UV filter won't make a non-weather sealed lens into a ...


2

A well defined disc is easier to achieve when the sun is behind clouds on the horizon. And of course clouds are what catches the color as the sun rises above or sinks over the edge of the earth. Ideally there’s just the right amount of clouds to give whatever effect you are seeking. A simple graduated ND filter can help balance the exposure of the sky and ...


18

[SAFETY WARNING: You should never image the sun with anything approaching a telephoto lens when it is more than about 10° above the horizon without a solar filter that not only protects against visible light, but also against UV and infrared!! Failure to heed this warning could result in permanent damage to your lens, camera, or eyes!] You don't need an ND ...


3

From the question: Whenever I try to focus, it allows me to only reach to a point where the subjects are only slightly blurry and beyond that it again goes out of focus. From comments by the OP: Neither at auto focus nor at manual. I can feel focus alright without filters. I tried in broad daylight both using live view and viewfinder. Its like reading ...


5

Camera focusing systems have a "Focusing brightness range" (Canon parlance), "detection range" (Nikon parlance) specification. This is found in the specifications section in your manual. Your camera is rated for 0-18EV for the center focus point, 1-18EV for the other focus points. Adding an ND filter will reduce the scene brightness below ...


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An ND (Neutral Density) filter blocks some light and pass some light. Its color is gray, so it works evenly on all colors. However, way ND filters are labeled can be confusing. Allow me to explain: In photography, we choose the f-stop as the increment of exposure change. We apply f-stop adjustments when we or camera automation changes the size of the entry ...


2

When you add ND filter you decrease the amount of light a lot. And for focusing you need fair amount of light and contrast. So the solution is to focus w/o filter, switch to manual focus and then put the filter to the lens.


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