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1

A filter factor of 3X means that when daylight balanced light (full spectrum light centered on around 5500K) is passed through the filter, the total amount of light will be reduced by a factor of three (3), and one-third (one-third) of the original light will pass through the filter. One-third (1/3) the light is equivalent to one and two-thirds (1 2/3) stops....


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TL;DR: is the scratch visible? Perhaps, perhaps not. I ended up buying the ND filter because I bought a lens from the same online used camera store and had to pay the shipping fee anyway due to the lens, so this filter was a very cheap purchase. The scratch is very hard to be photographed. It is visible to the naked eye if you rotate the filter in exactly ...


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With few exceptions, a filter passes the color it is named and checks its complements (opposites). We mounted a yellow filter on a camera loaded with black & white film to darken blue sky. We did this because often white fluffy clouds, usually back-lit, reproduced about the same shade of gray as did the blue sunlit sky. If we wanted a more dramatic ...


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Since black and white film records the overal intensity of light that reaches the film, colors that pass through the filter (orange) will appear brighter than colors that are blocked (blue and green), when used with black and white film. With color film, color-tinted filters will tint the scene with the color of the filter, unless further corrections are ...


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I don't have a good answer for your specific question, but my desire for precise ND graduated filters has led me to think about solutions somewhat similar to your problem. To begin with, it's instructive to understand the current state of the art for how graduated ND filters are created. As an example, here's a video from Lee Filters about how their ND ...


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I don't know, but this link says the Retina iia used a 29.5mm screw in, or a 32mm slip on filter. Confirmed by this link about the 45mm f/2.8 lens (at page bottom). Ebay has a several 29.5mm filters available.


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If the scratch significantly damages the ND layer, the filter may be a write-off: as opposed to a front lens (where a scratch may be problematic depending on whether you are working with backlight or small apertures), an ND10 filter mostly blocks light. A scratch cutting through the ND coating will be like a scratch on the front lens, except that it is a ...


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I am a fan of experimenting by myself, and to encourage others to do it, so: Make a test! But do not go around scratching filters. You can simulate a scratch on a normal filter putting, for example, a hair strand, or a really thin sticky tape. (Do not put a sticky tape on a coated filter) A scratch could be more or less visible depending on different ...


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