12

There are basically two ways to share filters between lenses with different thread sizes. You can buy screw on filters that fit the larger lens and use a step up ring to attach those filters to the smaller lens. You can use a system of filter holders that use adapter rings to attach to lenses with various filter thread sizes. You then use filters, many of ...


11

The only thing you have to be mindful of is with wide angle lenses. You just want to make sure that with the step up ring and filter attached that you don't see the filter edge in the field of view. Slim filters can help with that. Otherwise it's just fine. I do the same myself with 77mm filters.


10

The only ones I encountered is not being able to use a lens hood and not working at all with lenses which have a built-in lens hood. It is possible it may vignette on some lenses but I have not seen it happen on a DSLR. On one fixed-lens camera I needed a slim step-up ring by the manufacturer to do the trick. Based on the cost of good filters, this is the ...


10

In addition to filter diameter, you need to specify the thread pitch, the linear (axial) distance the filter, screw, etc. travels for one (or more) full rotations of the thread. For SAE (or SAE-derived) threads, the pitch is usually specified in number of threads per inch. For example, the 1/4"–20 tripod mount and screw have a 20 thread-per-inch (TPI) pitch. ...


10

Would you really like to have a 82mm filter thread on your 50mm f/1.8? Manufacturers tend to not oversize their products. They would not, for example, put the 50mm f/1.8 in the case of a 70-200 f/2.8 lens. It is cheaper to use the smallest casing available - and most customers will like that, too. If you made the 50mm f/1.8 larger (and thus heavier) but ...


9

You would need a step-down adapter, such as this with a 55mm thread into your kit lens, then a 52mm thread for the wide-angle converter. Unfortunately... you will very quickly discover that these wide-angle adapters are not worth the money, however tempting they may appear. I'm certain their entire purpose in life is to teach poor unsuspecting newbie ...


8

This looks like a spacer ring, which is used to add space between a lens and a filter (such as close-up filter) or other lens attachment to assist in focusing adjustment or increasing the angle of view. Note, however, that using this could create some vignetting, especially on wide-angle lenses.


8

A step-up ring allows you to fit a filter that has threads larger than your lens. A step-down ring does the opposite (with possible vignetting issues). If you have 72mm lens threads and want to fit a 77mm filter, you need a step-up ring. If you have 77mm lens threads and want to fit a 72mm filter, you need a step-down ring. So in your case you want a step-...


6

Is there a simple way of quickly swapping a circular polariser between lenses (of different filter diameters)? Not really. The simple solution is to have a polarizer for each lens so you don't have to swap them in difficult conditions. The cost-effective solution is to do as you are currently doing and use step down rings. Magnetic filter holders and ...


6

Adaptors to reduce the filter thread of a lens are a bad idea. They cause vignetting (dark areas in the corners). You might get away with a reduction of 2mm as different brands standardise on different sizes. Some kit lenses have bigger threads than they need so that the manufacturer needs to support fewer standard sizes. Apart from these 2 cases your not ...


6

Assuming you talk about the standard MF Planar 80/2.8 CF lens the filter is proprietary Bay 60. Most commonly used with a 67mm filter and an adapter. Older C lens used Bay 50, also proprietary.


6

Having a fixed size for the front element is a much bigger design constraint than the size of the "throat" of the lens mount. By locking the entire lens lineup to such a standard, camera system makers would be leaving possibilities on the table — they'd have to decide if they want bulky lenses or small ones. Manufacturers who choose small couldn't make fast ...


5

Yes a 49mm - 58mm step up ring is what you need. Here is one at BHPhotoVideo for example. And here are a bunch of results at amazon. I would also consider one of the kits that come with multiple step up rings such as this: http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Anodized-49-52mm-52-55mm-55-58mm/dp/B001G445Q4/ref=pd_bxgy_p_text_y


5

To get a smaller threaded lens to work with a 58mm adaptor just requires the appropriate stepping ring. You can get an entire set of these for not much money, or you can measure the lens to find out exactly which size you need (my money would be on the value stated on the lens itself to be the correct one): http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fotodiox-Anodized-49-52mm-...


5

If you want to buy just one filter and use it on both lenses, you can buy an appropriate step-up ring. Buy your filter at the 58mm size, and then get a 52-58mm step up ring to adapt the filter to your smaller lens.


5

I have used the Xume adapters. Awhile back I standardized on 77mm filters, and also found myself swapping them around all the time. I thought the Xume would be a perfect solution. When I bought them, they did not have a dedicated Xume-compatible lens cap, so I "made my own" with old-school screw-on/off caps and dedicated Xume rings for them. I also put Xume ...


5

Lenses with very narrow angles of view require front elements that are roughly equivalent to the size of the entrance pupil. A typical telephoto prime lens will have a front element less than 10% larger than the entrance pupil at the lens' maximum aperture. This is because the light rays collected by the lens are almost perpendicular to the imaging plane and ...


4

I believe that the easiest way to find out the filter size of a lens is to look at the lens cap. Pretty much the only information that you would find on the cap is who made it and the filter size that it fits. (Provided of course that it's the type of lens cap that attaches to the filter thread.) The lens cap from my Sigma 50-500 lens for example has this ...


4

There is always a specification. You will find it in three places: On the lens, either at the edge around the front optical element or on the side of the barrel. In the manual that came with your lens. On the web. Here is one on Sigma's site. Click Tech Specs to see the table where it says Filter-Size. There will be many numbers on the lens itself but you ...


4

You got it backwards. What you need is a step-up ring. This lets you use the largest size of filters on lens with smaller thread diameter. It works just as expected and is that is exactly what I do most of the time. There are two downsides to doing this: Lens hood no longer fits. This is really the big one, particularly for polarizers which are generally ...


4

49mm It never fails to research the lens and read the specs online. And there will be no room for mistake there: Olympus 50mm 1.8 Look for 'filter size', naturally.


4

Nope, can't say that I've ever tried what you're asking. But, I also wouldn't recommend it. Your proposed solution would leave the filter lacking .5mm - so it will probably not fit at all. I did some shopping for you and actually can't find a ton of filters in the size of 43.5mm. Seems to be an odd size. What I'd recommend is for you to get a Step-Up ...


3

the camera that you own, the Nikon L820 is a bridge /semi-pro camera. and there is no lens thread on the edge of your lens. so you can not fix an filter or a hood on your camera's lens (very unfortunate). however you can make your own lens hood and fix it :p , materials required: Paper cup / plastic cup Blade/cutter Procedure: measure the diameter of ...


3

As the advert says... "Everything you need to get started, apart from adapter ring specific to your lens diameter." Google tells me that lens has a 58mm thread, indicated by the ⌀58 on the front. [Double check that my info is correct before ordering.]


2

Having delved into telescopes, where optics are paramount, it is said by those in the know that diameter is everything. A lens' light gathering ability increases by the square of the diameter, and resolution is also increased.


2

The lens barrel of Z990 should have a 48.5 mm thread. This is not a standard filter size, but looks like some people have succeeded in modifying 49mm filters to fit by filing the thread slightly smaller. Another option is to use a filter adapter tube, but it seems very likely that the tube will black out corners and edges on shorter focal lengths.


2

I just looked at mine to be sure, and Pentax SMC M 50mm f/2 does not have the thread diameter marked on the lens either on the front (as pictured) or on the edge. Many lenses do indicate it usually in combination with a diameter symbol "⌀", but this one doesn't, probably because there's not much room with the writing that's already there. The 50mm is just ...


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