New answers tagged

0

Not rocket science -- most any building maintenance man / electrician will get the hang of it in a heart beat. Clean condensers with Windex.


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For 4 to 8 minutes -- 2/3 to 1 f-stop compensation is all you need apply.


1

The Rem-Jet (removable jet black backing) coat is a dispersion of lamp black (soot) in a binder of cellulous acetate phthalate. This binder is an “acid plastic”. It can be softened and washed away using an alkaline solution. Machine processing uses a pre-bath to temporarilly harden the film so it better withstands transport in a fast moving film processor. ...


1

In case any of these actually isn't serviceable: Take them to bits, practice macro photography on the bits. Also keep all the hardware as spares - screws, washers, ball bearings etc used in cameras and lenses are often similar, and the actual bayonet mounts can be useful in improvising adapters. Speaking of adapters: Keep the lenses, or check what they are ...


0

Use electronics cleaner on the mecahnism shown in your pic. You need to free up the gunk that is making it stick. The cleaner removes the gunk and it evaporates quickly. Only lubricate if you absolutely need to. WD-40 is an option, but be careful not to overspray.


7

Does the film have the RemJet anti-halation layer removed? If so, this process effectively increases the sensitivity of the film to ISO 800. (If not, you know this film shouldn't go through a regular C-41 process, right?) Will you use a 85 filter? If "none of the above", why not just shoot it at EI 500? If your camera can't set ISO 500, just set the camera ...


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Tri-X has excellent latitude and is actually closer to ISO 320 than 400. Did you shoot high contrast scenes or low contrast? Portraits or buildings. If you shot softer contrast scenes develop at 640. If you shot higher contrast scenes develop at 800. This is assuming you are using d-76 or similar. If you shot both, use 640. This is old school practice. ...


1

It sounds like you are new to scanning. Hope this helps. 1) With any high res scan, choose to save as Tiff in the maximum bit depth that your editing software will handle. Probably 32 or 48 bit. With black and white, 16 bit is sufficient. 2) You must decide what size scan you want to produce before you set your resolution and output size. I find ...


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EDITED after re-reading the OP. If you see it on the neg it is not the scanner. Vertical lines indicate horizontal stress on the film. Is your film advance lever moving smoothly or does it fight you a bit? If your advance lever is smooth and there are no signs of stress on sprocket holes, it could be a light leak. I don't think it's agitation. Did ...


0

I think there are three plausible possibilities in general: shutter problem with a focal-plane shutter; scanning problem; development problem, probably agitation; light leak in the camera or around the edges of the roll, or keeping the roll somewhere there is very bright light. From what you have said (1) and (2) can be ruled out: the camera has a leaf ...


0

I found the similar problem on my 135 color film. I had 2 different rolls and they both have the same thing. And the lines are more obvious on underexposed images. I had them both developed at the same lab but on different days.I will use a different camera and test it again. For now, I'm sure that it is not the film or scanner's problem (the lab scan and ...


1

This is what I would start with. You'll likely have to tweak settings to fit your specific needs. The main setting to disable is Digital ICE. The silver in B&W film interferes with its function. Original: Document Type and Film Type – These probably just set some reasonable defaults. What you've selected seems appropriate (Film, B&W Negative). Scan ...


2

How fine an increment can the camera exposure be adjusted? For more years than I want to remember, I managed a department that made process control materials. We exposed test films and made test prints; the goal was uniform precision day-to-day. The best we could do in the laboratory was an end product controlled to 1/3 f-stop. No easy task; everything that ...


2

I don't have this particular model (I have an L-308S-U), but after a bit of experimentation with a flashlight... That means that the currently recommended f-stop is f/4 plus 2/10 of a stop - towards 5.6, meaning the light is slightly brighter than what would cause it to recommend exactly f/4. You would use that number to determine when to move up to the ...


3

dpi is about the inches... pixels per inch. 4500x3000 pixels at 3200 dpi is 1.4 x 0.94 inches, on the film. 4500x3000 pixels at 360 dpi is 12.5 x 8.33 inches, on the print paper. The spacing and size of the printed pixels. It should have shown the inch dimensions too. This is simple division.... 4500 pixels / 360 dpi = 12.5 inches. Exactly the same ...


2

A light meter is a device to indicate the amount of electricity produced by a photocell according to the level of luminance. It correlates light intensity to a numerical index. The resulting numerical index (reading) is then used with a calculator (mechanical or algorithmic) to indicate a combination of intensity and time settings for an exposure by an ...


2

We use the light meter to gauge scene brightness. We set our camera's exposure based on the light meter reading augmented by experience. Our goal might be reduced contrast -- we pull. Our goal might be increased contrast -- we push. One axiom - expose for the shadows and then develop for the highlights -- it still stands! However I like this modification -- ...


3

If you use an external light meter, you should set its ISO setting to match the film in your camera. You use the meter to measure the light, and it tells you what aperture and shutter speed to set on your camera. It's as simple as that. You cannot just set any ISO value on the meter. Because that's not the sensitivity of the film in your camera. If you set ...


1

As Peter mentioned in comments, spot meters DO NOT and CANNOT correctly expose the spot. They only try make the spot come out middle gray level (because subject colors just confuse them). That may be good if your spot is middle gray, but you'll have to know to compensate about +1EV for a Caucasian face (this can vary). Cameras today have the best ...


0

If you want to use Ansel Adam's and Fred Archer's Zone System, you must use a spot-meter. The Zone System is a photographic technique for determining optimal film exposure and development, formulated by Ansel Adams and Fred Archer.1 Adams described the Zone System as "[...] not an invention of mine; it is a codification of the principles of ...


4

No, it does not. A given film has a given sensitivity, expressed as ISO. What this means is that, if processed normally, then there's a relationship between the amount of light which falls on a given area of the film and the density of that area after it is processed. This relationship is generally monotonic (more light means darker) but not linear or ...


3

This depends on what you want to do. I use pretty much entirely film cameras, so each frame I take costs me real money. For 35mm I don't think I have ever used a spotmeter: if I care enough and I'm uncertain about where I want exposure to sit, I might bracket, but 35mm film isn't expensive enough to worry enough about that, and the sorts of things I do ...


5

A spot meter is handy to be able to read the reflectivity of an object in the scene precisely from a distance. It is like putting a telephoto lens on a meter to isolate one part of the subject. An alternate method is to walk over to the subject and read the reflectivity close-up. Without a spot meter, you would take a reading of the average light ...


1

What does the ISO setting for mechanical 35mm film cameras actually do? In the simplest of terms, it is a setting that calibrates the meter. Let's assume we are shooting under "Sunny 16" conditions where a proper exposure of ISO/ASA 100 film would be 1/100 second at f/16. If we set the aperture to f/16 and meter the scene, the meter will show a ...


2

This is probably opinion-based. The truth is that I only use a light meter for incident light on a studio. If that is why you are using it, you do not need a spotmeter. If you are taking photos of landscape or architecture for example, and you also want to do a zone metering, you probably need it. This will also depend if you are using digital or not. If ...


3

"Is it worth it" greatly depends on what you are doing, how you approach your photography, and what other gear you are planning to use. If you have a modern digital camera, then their value is greatly diminished. If you're working with a large format film camera, then they're invaluable if you like to carefully inspect the light of the scene before deciding ...


2

When we talk about color film, we often try to simplify the lesson by describing the film as only having three light sensitive layers. This is actually an oversimplification. A typical color film likely has more than one light sensitive coat for each of the three light primary colors which are red, green, and blue. The top emulsion layers are sensitive to ...


2

Just like a there are different types of hammers, and a ball-peen hammer isn't always the type you want to use...there are different ways to meter a scene and a spot isn't always the type you want to use. But, it does come in handy to nail down the correct exposure in tough lighting conditions. What you need to look at is the different tools available and ...


6

The function of an ISO setting completely depends on the camera: Fully manual, no meter camera (Early rangefinders/TLR's): May have had a dial or slot for you to store part of the film box as a reminder for you to remember what you loaded. Exposure calculation would be done with a handheld meter or would be assumed based on rules like Sunny-16. Cards were ...


1

If I'm understanding you correctly, that's not quite how it works. Film is made of a stack of layers as shown here. Speaking broadly, we can discuss only three layers, the red, green, and blue sensitive emulsions. When light passes through them in the "correct" direction, the blue sensitive emulsion absorbs the highest wavelengths of light, while the lower ...


1

Agree with mattdm, but I wanted to spin it another way. It's where you tell the camera the ISO rating of the film you've put in it. In practice it works like exposure compensation and tells the light meter (or automatic exposure) how it should vary the aperture and shutter settings for correct exposure, but many people shooting 35mm film would just think "...


10

Usually, it does not affect or limit the aperture or shutter speed at all. Rather, it tells the exposure meter where the center is. In some ways, it's exactly like exposure compensation dials. If the camera has a program mode, it's essential information for getting exposure right. If it doesn't, like the Pentax K1000, it just shifts the exposure needle — if ...


0

Lenses are fitted to cameras based on need. What you need to know is what focal length will be considered telephoto, normal, or wide-angle. A normal lens is multipurpose. The normal is popular because it delivers a perspective that is the counterpart of how we see the world. A wide-angle lens has an expanded field-of-view. They are most useful when it is ...


1

The 50mm is the most flexible lens you can get. You can photograph anything you want, with maybe subpar results. If you have old lenses, you can even make them become a tilt-shift one with one of these adapters. Tilt-shift capabilities can be pretty handy for real estate. However, if you plan on taking pictures inside, or in a narrow street, the 50mm lens ...


3

You can take building photos with any lens you have. The biggest tradeoff is in perspective - if you have a relatively long lens, the perspective is completely different than a wide-angle lens because you have to step back farther to get the entire building in. Only you can decide exactly what type of look you are aiming for. There are other tradeoffs, too -...


4

Can I use 50mm f2 lens to take building photos? In my case will be an Yashica ML 50mm f/2. Yes. Yes you can.


3

How important is the quality of the negative for Lightroom processing (Path A) versus conventional printing (Path B)? A good negative is a joy to work with. A bad negative must be salvaged, no matter which path you choose. If wet printing, you may find yourself tediously burning and dodging in order to milk just a tad more highlight detail from your nearly ...


2

Should I continue with film? ... I enjoy it very much but the costs of film in my country are going higher and higher... I'm not so much of a shooter due to my master studies. Some people enjoy continuing to use film. I have switched to digital.  Costs are mostly spent on cameras, lenses, and accessories. Images are immediately available for review, ...


3

Ansel Adams is my hero. He mastered how to intermix the science of photography and the art of photography. I highly recommend reading his books and those about him. In short, he perfected what he called “previsualization”. In other words, study the vista before you shoot the picture. Know in advance the scale of the picture. Should objects in shadow show ...


2

It makes absolutely no difference where an incident reading is taken. The only thing that matters is that the meter sees the same light as the subject does, and with the same orientation relative to the source and camera (angle of incidence). I.e. if the light source is the sun behind you and you want to take a picture of a mountain 3 miles away; then just ...


9

Radiation encounterd during space missions, effect on film was well studied by NASA: The Effects of Space Radiation on Flight Film (pdf) A few days in space is generally the equal of about 150 days aging of the film. Some of NASA moon photography shows visible signs of degradation due to background radiation. Do peruse the NASA study – it answers all ...


28

There are two and a half parts to this answer. First part: if you are in LEO (low Earth orbit) (The only EVAs outside LEO were part of the Apollo programme) then you're inside the Van Allen belt and the radiation environment is therefore significantly nicer. No humans have been higher than LEO since Apollo. Secondly, if you're outside the Van Allen belt, ...


0

Incident is Old French for "about to happen". In other words, light is about to hit the subject. You place the meter near the subject. Point the meter back towards the camera and take a reading. An incident reading should read about the same as a reflective light meter reading taken off an 18% gray card. The accuracy of the incident reading gives rise to its ...


13

While radiation above the atmosphere is indeed higher than on Earth, it is not so high as to ruin photographic film as quickly as your question would imply. The amounts you reference from NASA are exposures during a mission, not a short space walk. In a NASA study on photographic film sensitivity during the shuttle years, NASA basically found that radiation ...


0

If you are measuring incident light, you want to measure it at the place where whatever it is incident on is. So, for instance, if you want to measure the light falling one someone's face, you measure it as close to their face as you can. If you wanted to meter incident light on the Moon, you need to go to the Moon to do it, even if you plan on taking the ...


2

The costs of film photography seem prohibitive to me for a beginner, even if there is probably a lot to learn from this practice, especially in that it leads to thinking before pressing the shutter button. As for the X-PRO1: it was when it was released on the market near the frontier of the available technology. This is obviously no longer the case but it ...


1

Many of us grizzled old-timers like to boast about how we started with film in the era before autofocus existed and how it forced us to learn how to be real photographers.¹ But the reason we did so was because it was the only way to start back then. Now that you have a choice, though, learning with film is probably not the best way to get where you want to ...


3

I'd consider doing stand processing on this roll. If you don't develop yourself, now would be an excellent time to start, as labs don't offer stand developing. Traditional development is, relatively, very precise. That is, traditional development is very sensitive to exposure, temperature and timing. Developing this way usually lasts 7-15 minutes, while ...


1

In contradiction to (handheld) spot meters and incident light meters, reflective light meters such as the one in your FM2 are harder to use for precise metering. As explained in this answer, spot meters have a very narrow angle of view, thereby metering only a small part of the entire scene. With such specific metering, you can imagine it is not all too ...


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