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I have a Super Takumar 50mm f/1.4, one of the more common lenses with a thoriated rear element. I've owned it for forty years, and a couple times left 400 speed film in the camera for several months with the lens mounted, and never seen any effect. Why? First, between the lens and the film is a mirror and shutter curtain (in an SLR -- in a Speed Graphic ...


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The most reliable way to avoid problems is to buy film locally at your destination or have it shipped to your hotel (or wherever you're staying), then have it processed before you fly home. You can take along basic equipment (changing bag, daylight processing tank, negative sleeves/pages) in check bags, though I'd only take dry packaged chemicals, and then ...


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From the horse's mouth: The checked baggage goes through some rather powerful scanner that can damage unprocessed film. Of course you can put them in protective bags, but these bags could look suspicious to inspection personnel. The carry-on baggage is scanned with much lighter devices that shouldn't damage film, but you should avoid running through too ...


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I just want to compliment the other answers, not making another one. The red light is safe only for black and white paper or for orthochromatic film. The orthochromatic film, using the word "litho" is a high contrast film. It was widely used in print reproduction, but it was an interesting medium to explore. If you are going to use a bag, do not ...


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At The Outset, photo materials only responded to the shorter and thus more energetic wavelengths (X-Ray, ultraviolet, violet, and blue). Hermann Vogel, Professor of Photography at Berlin Technical, was experimenting, trying to solve the problem of “halation”. This is a halo like artifact that often surrounds highlights. These are caused when the lens ...


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No, most film is still sensitive to a red safety light. That's more for seeing what you're doing when wet-printing, where you can find photo paper that isn't. But most folks scan and go digital these days if they're printing, not so much the oldschool methods with an enlarger and chemical trays. But. You also don't have to be in completely darkness to load a ...


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A few tips: Firstly, as xenoid said, most (all?) modern film is panchromatic, meaning it is sensitive to the entire visible light spectrum. You need to make sure your darkroom / wherever you decide to load your films into the tank is absolutely pitch dark. Loading film in dark is not terribly difficult once you get the hang of it. But it makes sense to ...


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No, you can't use a red light bulb because your film is sensitive to red light if it's panchromatic film (unlike the paper used for B&W prints), so you have to train yourself to operate in the dark. IMHO the less risky part of the from-camera-to-print process is the print, because spoiling a print just spoils that instance, while spoiling a roll of ...


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