New answers tagged

2

The way major museums and institutions such as the Smithsonian do it is with a large format camera using a digital scan back under very controlled lighting. Such a setup combines the strengths of flatbed scanners while scanning at very high resolutions and cameras that give greater control over the lighting used. More details about such a setup and how it ...


1

Are you speaking of continuously projecting one single slide, or projecting through a tray of 40 slides? Bad either way, but if one slide, you certainly better prepare many duplicate expendable copies. Kodachrome is said to be the best long archival life if stored in the dark, but the worst about fading with continual projection. Fujichrome is said to be ...


3

I recommend the second alternative, with some conditions. I expect your prints to be often larger than A4, and a flatbed this size takes a lot of space, costs money, ... If you have a wall available, place a vertical flat support on it, buy a piece of "museum glass" (it is basically invisible, no significant reflections, very thin, ...) and place the print ...


4

Considering that you put a significant amount of work in at the darkroom printing stage then scanning the print is the best way to go. However this can be done either by yourself using a your own scanner or by sending the originals to a company that will scan them to professional standard. The second option I would only use if the images were to be ...


5

If possible: move to digital My first thought is to move to digital: make digital scans or photos of your slides and use a digital projector and a laptop. One of the risks of a projector running 24x7 is overheating, with the possibility of a fire breaking out. Please be aware of that. Also take into account that you'll need to frequently change the light ...


2

There's no useful definition of 'best'. For a long time I used 1+25, now I used 1+50, both using pretty much the massive dev chart's times (and I always use it at 400). 1+25 is possibly a little grainier, but both look fine enlarged to 12x16, assuming what you want is something that looks like a print from 35mm Tri-X.


1

If you are referring to a relatively small number of white dots on the enlarged/scanned neg this is dust, and the other answer addresses this. You never altogether get rid of dust. However it looks as if you have at least one other problem, although it might be a scanning artifact: the sky in the second image has vertical bands of light and dark in it. If ...


1

These spots seem like typical dust spots. I encounter them regularly and are usually quite easy to remove in Lightroom or Photoshop. In the darkroom, it is more of a hassle. After meticulous dust removal pre-exposure, dust may still show (significant) spots on the print. Here, retouch kits are used. You won't ever get rid of dust. You worded it nicely, it's ...


0

Parallax correction can be found even in some inexpensive chinese TLRs, so parallax is not always an issue - minimum focusing distance on most of these is rather limiting though. One definitive advantage is social, certainly in street-photography like situations: TLRs look outlandish and nostalgic enough that people tend to be more awed about someone still ...


2

the textbooks say this is probably a bad idea, I know of one photographer who has beautiful work who commonly rates is ISO film speeds lower to overexpose with both color film and tri-x black and white film... Johnny patience, who can be found online shoots Kodak tri-x 400 at ISO 200 to overexpose at one stop, henan has it over developed one stop and his tri-...


3

If what happened is as you reported, i.e. only 4 frames exposed, you likely will be OK shooting the remainder. This is because the film cassette is light proof thus is protects the yet to be exposed film. Re-load, fire off 6 frames and then shoot. One can never be quite positive about such things, something might not be as reported. If it were me, I would ...


15

The white square is a frosted glass pane which allows light in to illuminate the frame lines in the viewfinder. Many rangefinder cameras have something like this, in particular all M Leicas, until recently when they changed (I presume) to illuminating the frame lines with some internal light source. The second small window is the other half of the ...


17

As you can see in the image below from the service manual, the volume behind these two features is occupied by the view finder assembly. Image source: manualslib.com Image source: manualslib.com The round hole is for one of the two optical paths of the range finder optics. The white rectangle is used as a light source for the frame line indications inside ...


1

We used to experiment with a kind of gas hyper-sensitization using mercury. It wasn't the epitome of environmental concern but we were young, stupid, and irresponsible. We would put a drop of mercury into a closed container with film and put it onto a room radiator to warm up and vapourize the mercury for varying amounts of time. This increased the ...


3

I think half of this question can be half answered fairly easily (so this is a quarter of an answer). People making very long exposures on film needed to hypersensitize their film to deal with reciprocity failure. Those people were almost exclusively astronomers. None of those people will be using film now, and certainly any observatory with the ...


0

In the distant past, gas-hypersensitization was practiced by most every major astronomical observatory along with cold packs to freeze film. These methods increase the film's ISO mainly by mitigating reciprocity failure. This is the demon that robs film of its sensitivity when long exposure times are required. Most observatories had their own equipment along ...


0

More an observation than an answer: bouncing flash off a ceiling works the best with a low(ish) flat white ceiling. The location you did your shooting seems to have (as indicated e.g. on frame 15A) a high, angled ceiling of rather dark weathered planks. That is not a very reflective surface, with flash underexposure all but certain. I would expect a ...


1

Pentax AF280T (always set to green two-level auto flash operation, head tilted 40 degrees up) If you don't have one, you can download a .pdf Pentax AF 280T Manual. Forty degrees is not high enough for bounce flash in most situations. The light from your flash appears to have bounced off the ceiling and come down well past your intended subjects. Either ...


0

Low contrast, muddy color negative photos mean one thing: underexposure. Many of your images are lacking in light! I agree with Tetsujin's comment that it appears that you aimed the flash head up, intending to bounce, but did not get enough light this way. Either your flash wasn't powerful enough, the ceiling was too high, your flash head was not pointed ...


0

The dial came before the film box holder because when this camera was made it wasn't uncommon to reload 35mm film canisters from bulk 500ft rolls of film, so there wouldn't necessarily have been a box each time the camera was loaded.


1

I have encountered this same problem, and I can sympathize. Pec-12 does remove the adhesive If the glue were water soluble, Pec-12 would have no effect, so this tells you that it is not water soluble and there's no point soaking your film in distilled water (unless you want to give it a good cleaning). The pad gets stuck in the film indents; have to ...


2

The two major options are: Zone focusing. Set an aperture and distance so that the subject will fall within the depth of field. You can try hyperfocal distance – "F8 and be there." Use a rangefinder accessory. Search for "Ideal rangefinder", "pocket rangefinder", and "Lomo rangefinder" for some options. These work like rangefinder cameras, but you read ...


22

This camera was mainly intended for use by amateur photographers who only occasionally used the camera. Film was loaded, some pictures taken, the camera was generally set-aside to be picked up latter for an occasion. This second or perhaps third session might be next week or next month or even next year. When the roll was finished, then it was sent out to ...


2

None of these cameras is an SLR, nor is there an integrated rangefinder (some Silette models had a rangefinder, this one has not). These cameras are indeed intended to be focused by using a well calibrated guess, a measuring tape, or an attached rangefinder accessory. The manuals included depth of field tables. Mind that the lenses are not very fast, and ...


41

This is just a passive dial (that does not communicating anything to the camera mechanism), meant as a memorizing aid for the film type and speed inserted. The degree values are DIN speed numbers. C seems to be a shorthand for generic "Color" film. CT, CN17 and K appear to be shorthands for various Agfa film stocks that were contemporary for that camera: ...


0

Well, if you use the same lens on the camera and on the enlarger then the lens distortion will cancel out. To some degree this also goes for vignetting. Only perspective distortion remains, and must be cancelled manually by tilting the enlarger and the lens.


1

A filter factor of 3X means that when daylight balanced light (full spectrum light centered on around 5500K) is passed through the filter, the total amount of light will be reduced by a factor of three (3), and one-third (one-third) of the original light will pass through the filter. One-third (1/3) the light is equivalent to one and two-thirds (1 2/3) stops....


5

I'm pretty late to the game here, but- not knowing if you dried it or not matters a lot. If the film was still wet (swelled gelatin) then we'd probably water bath it and get it into the machine directly, after washing it with photoflo. If it's been dried, however, the lab is going to have to un-reel it and separate the gelatin from sticking, then clean it, ...


23

Contrary to some comments here, a 135 film cartridge is very open to water intrusion. The film slot and both spindle holes are designed only to keep out light. The cartridge filled with water in just a few seconds after it was submerged. If you still have a a professional photo lab, preferably one with a darkroom and someone who knows how to use it, I would ...


4

Yes !! Same thing happened to me last year !! The photos actually came out cooler than I thought !! Not all of them came out but all the ones they did they where amazing !!


3

With few exceptions, a filter passes the color it is named and checks its complements (opposites). We mounted a yellow filter on a camera loaded with black & white film to darken blue sky. We did this because often white fluffy clouds, usually back-lit, reproduced about the same shade of gray as did the blue sunlit sky. If we wanted a more dramatic ...


3

Since black and white film records the overal intensity of light that reaches the film, colors that pass through the filter (orange) will appear brighter than colors that are blocked (blue and green), when used with black and white film. With color film, color-tinted filters will tint the scene with the color of the filter, unless further corrections are ...


12

Generally if film gets wet and then dries, the film will stick to itself. Sometimes it can be saved by pre=soaking in water and separated (difficulty). Prognosis is not good. Some labs may attempt -- lots of work. Best of luck.


11

The film is probably fine, but definitely heed rackandboneman's comment about informing a lab about what happened. They may not take your film if it's contaminated. Water is certainly not going to harm film. Detergent probably won't, either. Some detergents contain dyes that could settle on the emulsion or backing and may be harder to remove if the roll ...


0

Most of it is common sense. I am a maniac, so let me categorize things. Maintenance, in general, is divided into two categories. 1. Preventive Cleaning Lubrication 2. Corrective Parts replacement Oxidation Electric malfunction Light leak The first part is to actually know the stuff. So take a screwdriver, on a clean desk and try to disassemble some ...


4

The mirror dampening material, just like that of the light seals, is made of foamy rubber which degrades over time and becomes brittle. Unfortunately you cannot prevent this from happening. This isn't super catastrophic as this material is fairly and cheap to replace. Since you've noticed the material falling apart, I suggest you to replace the seals and ...


0

Here's what I'd do: Take it apart and blow it out with dry compressed air use specific bulb designed for enlarging if you change bulbs clean the condensor (s) with lintless wipes and use lens cleaner spray some wd-40 on a rag and wipe the gears and tracks with it, use very lightly and sparingly If the elevation lock is broken fix/replace it... duhhh! ...


1

You need to tell us the make and model of the camera. Some models, upon being loaded and the back shut, advance the film all the way. In other words, the normal action of the camera is to pull out all the film and wind it onto a take-up spool. Thereafter, the camera returns the film, one frame length at a time, as a picture is taken, to the safety of the ...


0

It really sounds like you've gotten hold of some 12 exposure film rolls. Loaded carefully without using any more leader than absolutely necessary, one can get an extra shot out of them. It's the same thing with 24 and 36 exposure rolls. One can usually get 25 and 37 frames, respectively, with most 135 format cameras. Self-winding cameras that first appeared ...


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