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1

As this pattern appears on a thin (underexposed) frame of the roll, I think it is due to slight over agitation in processing. The marks are characteristic of 35mm film over agitation. Carefully inspect the rest of the roll and you will see the same effect on other frames coinciding with the sprocket holes. The sprocket holes increase the flow of developer ...


3

It's called "light piping" and it is due to some minor/cumulative light leak/exposure. Films with a polyester base are more prone to it, as is B&W positive film. The only thing you can do to minimize the potential of occurrence is to store the film with as little exposure to light as possible (before loading and after exposure). https://...


3

A hair. Looks sharp enough that it could be on the film side of the shutter in which case getting it out should be easy. If it is on the other side of the shutter and your camera has an interchangeable lens, you should be able to get at it with removing the lens and putting up the mirror. If you don't have an interchangeable lens, it might require ...


1

As Mark R. said, and btw thank you, that's the way bulb mode works in the C lens I own (65mm & 127mm), they both have the 'B slot', which is right besides the PC sync for flash. I am now finally able to do bulb mode in my RB67, using 2 cable releases. Just check if the lens you're wanting to buy has the B slot, I am looking into buying a C 180mm, and it ...


2

Sounds like your 1st development was off and/or the peroxide (bleach) bath didn't remove the developed silver from the developed negative image, either because the dilution was off or the time was off. The fact that you can see some vestige of image points to the bleach step being the culprit. The bleach step gets rid of the negative silver image, and the re-...


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