New answers tagged

2

A very late update: 127 film is now available, new, in both color and black and white, from Rera (Rerapan, ISO 100 B&W, and Rerachrome, ISO 100 color negative despite the name); it's available from B&H Photo and Film Photography Project. Frugal Photographer also offers at least two color print emulsions in 127 (this is the Canadian-packaged Bluefire ...


2

I've got some experience with "found film" -- it's a lot of fun. First, don't expect much; film that stood in the camera, potentially for decades, is likely to be heavily fogged and show mottling and/or wrapper offset (where the ink on the backing has fogged the emulsion in contact with it on the supply and takeup spools). Second, you'll likely ...


0

The picture has a number of factors that contribute to its appearance. The light source is diffuse. The flat light does not create significant shadows to communicate the three dimensional structure of the subject's head. The red light source is similar to a red filter. This may have lightened the appearance of skin tones in the image. The plane of focus ...


2

Film have a different ISO for different light sources. Set your meter at the rated ISO for for the film you are using. Expose 1 fame as indicated by the meter. Now using manual aperture control, shoot what is called an "exposure series or bracketing". I suggest making a test in 1 f-stop increments. 4 then 3 then 2 f-stops under followed by 1 then ...


1

The L508 is capable of metering both reflective light using its spot meter, as well as incident light, which is done using the white dome. Although reflective metering is more common (think of light meters built in cameras), they suffer from not being colourblind. A reflective light meter assumes to be 'looking' at a middle grey scene. If that scene is ...


0

You've got a processing chain : Object -> lens -> shutter -> film -> scan -> print -> eye Every section can be the bottleneck in the rendering to your brain, depending on what use case you are in. On top of that, your thinking in terms of resolution is too simple, as the eye does not in fine behaves like a computer but analyses contrasts. ...


1

Getting to your ultimate question about the gamut to use for scanning photos. The short answer is that yes, it can make sense to scan photos with a wider gamut than sRGB. Modern printers can definitely print colors that fall outside of sRGB (in fact, a fair number even exceed the range of AdobeRGB 98). The only real question then is what colors you have in ...


2

The other answers are excellent and give a great explanation of the mechanics of film -> printing pixel resolution. I wanted to highlight a particular (35mm) contemporary (black and white) film, which has very high resolution (800 line pairs/mm): Adox CMS II 20 From their materials: Adox CMS II ISO 20 is the one of the sharpest, most fine grain films ...


1

Yes, going to film photography is really interesting for many reasons: color rendering. I have had many digital cameras since decades now, and none of them have achieved the vivid color rendering of the photo below (so easy with film). Even with editing - just increasing saturation or applying filters etc. isn't enough, color rendering editing is a ...


0

Color print paper is CMY. We are talking cyan (blue-green), magenta (red-blue) and yellow dye only. Ink based prints such as ink-jet or dye sublimation use pigments and or dye or both. In these systems as well as lithography fail to produce a "good" black. Thus the prints lack sufficient contrast. A black hue should form when CMY are superimposed. ...


1

The manual for the XR500 does not indicate that there is a way to turn the light meter off. Except by removing the batteries.


0

Anything based on the recording/display of light itself is additive color (RGB) based... e.g. silver halide print paper, film negatives, and film positives (slides), LED monitors. Anything based on pigments is subtractive color (CMYK) based... e.g. inkjet prints.


1

A part of me thinks that [if we enlarged a digital image beyond a certain size] we would eventually see pixels. I'm guessing that when you say "pixels," you mean, solid-color squares. But that is not actually what "pixel" means in the field of digital image processing. If you blow up a digital image to the point where each image pixel ...


31

According to Ken Rockwell: Fuji Velvia 50 is rated to resolve 160 lines per millimeter. This is the finest level of detail it can resolve, at which point its MTF just about hits zero. Each line will require one light and one dark pixel, or two pixels. Thus it will take about 320 pixels per millimeter to represent what's on Velvia 50. 320 pixels x 320 pixels ...


5

Your 1m x 1.5m print has a resolution. If this were dpi, you could have 39.3in x 59.6in, and if that were 300 dpi, then it would be 11790px x 17880px. So, if you wanted to print at 300dpi, you basically need an image of 210,805,200 or 210 megapixels. 300dpi is the quality of most 5x7 or 8x10 photo prints. Most large prints are not 300dpi. But this gives you ...


0

NO batteries required. Use, or Modify?, a 4x5 Large format film holder so you can attach or tape the film, removed from the cartridge, in the middle of it. Assuming it will not interfere with the dark-slide, you may have to remove the plastic center piece in the disc of film. Now use the 4x5 LF film holder in Pinhole camera that accepts 4x5 LF film ...


2

I found at least one: the Keystone 1040 Everflash. This camera uses a manual film advance (so may even work without a battery), and uses two AA cells to power the flash. Given there's one, there are probably other Disc cameras that don't even have a battery -- fixed-everything doesn't need it if they give a means to advance the disc to the next frame. I ...


3

So turns out my guesses were completely wrong. I did end up opening the camera and putting some drops of oil in recommended places, which didn't end up solving the issue. However, during this process I removed the battery for the built in light meter. The original 1.3V battery is not really available anymore but I found out that a standard 1.4V hearing aid ...


1

First. Every time you send something to be developed ask for the full film to be returned, even if all of it is messed up. This will help you diagnose what is happening. If you have all the film and you only have 1 print, you need to analyze the negatives. Here is an example on a light leak on the film: These SLR developed photos are bad. Is it mine or the ...


1

It sounds like the film is not automatically advancing as it should. If you are using rechargeable NiCad or Li-Ion batteries, they output a lower nominal voltage than the recommended alkaline batteries. This may or may not be the source of the failure to advance the film. When you take out and replace the batteries, does the film advance when you put the ...


1

On this camera the film does not auto advance to the first frame when you shut the back cover. Once the film is in you then have to use the shutter release button repeatedly to advance it until the frame counter reads 1. Here is link to a page that has a link on it, at the bottom of the page, to download a PFD of the manual. Watch this video It is in a ...


6

So if my film ISO is 100, before metering and taking pictures with my camera, shouldn't I dial in 50 ISO on my light meter to compensate for that +1? Yes. You've got it. If your shutter speeds are edging into the seconds, do keep in mind reciprocity failure and the additional time needed to compensate for that as well. But, for general shooting at handheld ...


2

It strikes me as odd that you'd get 31 frames in before a loading issue cropped up...but, I guess stranger things have happened. If you have a professional camera shop and developer in your town, simply take the whole camera to them. They will have a darkroom, dark box, etc. and will be more accustomed to removing jammed up film. They'll get it unwound, back ...


1

The processed Kodachrome slide film consists of colored dye imbedded in purified gelatin. If you examine a slide via reflected light, looking at the emulsion side, you will see relief image. Meaning the slide is not uniformly flat, the gelatin had different thicknesses based on image content. The gelatin of the emulsion is an attractive food for microscopic ...


0

Both photos were taken with raking light. Both have multiple smaller artifacts. The primary artifacts are not on all photos. The camera dates from the late 1950's before more modern lens coatings were common. I suspect that it is internal reflection. The washed out nature of the primary artifact is consistent with that as are the secondary artifacts. I ...


1

I had something similar and it was a piece of debris in my lens. Took me ages to work out it was there so definitely worth a look.


0

Visually inspect the shutter/aperture while in operation. Does it open/close smoothly or does it hesitate? I suspect your shutter is sticking.


0

The first pic is fine but overexposed by a stop or two. The second pic was shot into the sun in harsh light. Flare, ghosting, chroma aberrations, lack of contrast, etc. will happen when you shoot into the sun with film or digital. Film doesn't average out expsoure and grain like digital does. Film reacts variably and independently across the frame.


1

If it sounded like it rewound, it rewound. If you absolutely need to use the rest of that roll you must press rewind to be sure it rewound and then reload the film in a pitch dark room. You may need a leader puller if your camera rewinds all the film back into the canister. In that dark room WITH THE FLASH TURNED OFF you can click the shutter 12 or 13 ...


0

If I am shooting an entire roll in one day I advance the film after every shot. If I am not using the camera regularly I always leave it un-cocked. Leaving the shutter cocked for extended periods of time will damage the mechanism. Cameras with internal motor drives. i.e. Nikon 6006, are an exception to this rule.


0

You need to specify how your camera works. When I shot film, winding the film forward also stretched the spring to allow the shutter to operate for the next shot. There was a way to push the advance lever without advancing the film if you intentionally wanted a double exposure, but I never used it. If your camera works the same way, the only downside to ...


0

When I was shooting film, I always immediately advanced and cocked to be ready for a quick shot. Inadvertent double exposures were not possible on my camera as cocking was default coupled to film advance. Similarly wasting a frame by double advancing was not possible either, you couldn't advance without triggering the shutter. On the rare instances where I ...


0

Normally it should say E for empty if it rewound on most electric film cameras. First: If the film is not rewound you should be fine. Your roll will end at an odd time. Second: Many newer cameras will not fire if the film isn't loaded, or has been rewound. With mechanical cameras that didn't have this safeguard you could feel the film tension. (Lots of ...


3

I think you exposed negative color film and sent it off to a photofinisher for developing and printing. You should know that color negative film developing and printing is a three-step process. First the film is developed in an automated film developing machine. Next the film is fed into an automated printer. After the film has been exposed to photo paper, ...


1

As a followup to MaxW's answer. We tend to want to think that there is such a thing as an unmodified picture. There really is no such thing, either film or digital. There is an assumed light balance as in daylight film. There is an assumed actual light that may match to some degree. The color printer will guess at both light and color compensations. The ...


0

I really agree with AlaskaMan but I'll assume that you're using a daylight film. The first picture: It looks like you used a "medium" f-stop so the foreground is in focus but not the far background. Compare leaves in lower left to leaves on tree 2/3 the way across the top. The lower right corner has very little light so it is very dark. The ...


Top 50 recent answers are included