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I hate the description analog, I prefer chemical based -- The first permanent image was produced by Joseph Nicephore Niepce in Central France in 1827. Niepce’s method required an 8 hour exposure. He associated with Louis Jacques Madne Daguerre. Daguerre made his presentation at the Academy of Science 1839. The Daguerreotype is a copper plate, silver plated, ...


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Film simply doesn't perform well "indoors in low light situations". Light levels are measured as an Exposure Value (EV). Home interiors with average light measure about EV 5. With ISO 400 film, EV 5 scenes would require an exposure of about 0.5 seconds at f/8. Was the camera exposing for so long? I doubt it. Even with flash, you may not necessarily ...


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There are several ways to go beyond a Grade 5 contrast, but they're all well beyond ordinary printing. First, you can gain up to about a half grade, in some cases, by switching print developers -- unfortunately, the most common developers, like Dektol, are already the higher contrast sort. Second, you could make a copy negative. Using either ortho lith film ...


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Just a thought, but did your camera go through an airport scanner? Certain scanners can damage unprocessed film, it is therefore recommended to remove the film from the camera before you get to security and get it hand-checked if possible


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The orange veil to the right of the last image is a common effect of light fogging. In fact, I've seen that many times on the first frame of 35mm when I started exposing without winding enough frames first. The white fog might be a different sort of light leak, perhaps due to the shutter not being completely closed when you advance film and cock the camera....


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If you don't shoot that many rolls, it really makes sense to pay a lab with the proper high end equipment to scan it for you. The machines they use can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. You'll get far better quality than doing it yourself on anything in a consumer price range. You'll probably still spend less in the long run.


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Yes, you can safely combine two 1L kits (from the same manufacturer, please!) into a single 2L quantity. Just use twice the starting water, mix the ingredients in order as instructed, and top up to 2L instead of 1L when everything is in for each solution. Be sure to mix both bottles or bags of each component (Part A, Part B, etc.) before going on to the ...


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I'm wondering if anyone has successfully doubled a 1L kit If your intent is to mix a kit with double water, concentration would be half. You would need to adjust development times, if it works at all. you know when a recipe yields 12 cookies but you want 24? I am trying to make a 2L kit from two 1L kits. As long as you use the right temperatures and ...


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first of all, good call on going with a medium format film camera. you'll thank yourself later :) expired film is primarily used for the creative effects it can yield (over-saturated colors, unexpected tones, weird streaks, etc.). it can be very fun and cool to shoot, but don't expect the level of consistency and sharpness you'll get from fresh film! part of ...


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According to the Canon website, the Canon Pixma TS9155 AiO uses CIS (Contact Image Sensor) for scanning. This type of sensor is not suitable for scanning film negatives or transparencies. Other options include: Flatbed scanner with transparency adapter. Many people seem to get good results with Epson Perfection V### scanners. They usually include the ...


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