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4

Your first image is incredibly underexposed. Grainy + grey/lack of contrast on color negative films is the dead giveaway for underexposure. Your second image looks properly exposed and the color and contrast look to be what I'd expect with Portra 400 shot midday-ish in hard sun. I don't think there is a gear/film issue here. ISO400 film is not fast enough ...


1

Find a tiny key-chain flashlight that remains on without the need to keep pressing the button. This flashlight must be small enough to fit in the camera with no film loaded and the back closed. Turn on flashlight and close film loading door. Find the darkest room in your home, likely a closet or bath. Cover all cracks under and around the door with towels. ...


1

You should be able to find a Konica flash for it on eBay. The FP-1 User Manual says the Konica X-18, X-24, and X-36 are recommended.


3

For home processing, there are two advantages of separate bleach and fix over blix. First, bleach and fix have antagonistic longevity requirements -- that is, bleach likes oxygen, thiosulfate (the core ingredient of all commercial fixers) does not. Therefore blix cannot last well. For kits, with a limited developer life, this isn't a huge problem, hence ...


4

The C-41 and E-6 processes and their cine counterparts evolved in an era where giant regional processing labs were the norm. I was technical manager for 7 such labs in the Southeast United States. Each was sized to handle 20,000 rolls of color film a day. Such labs as these were duplicated in countless locals worldwide. Regardless of what you think, the vast ...


2

If I understand your question correctly, your camera does not allow for a shutter speed selection and is always on Aperture-Priority? Cool. You've already discovered, it seems, that you can modify the ASA/ISO/FilmSpeed setting to encourage shutter speeds that would normally fall outside of the metered parameter for the film actually in the camera. But, if ...


1

already got the answer by trying it out myself. Lowering the ASA is practically proxy for a longer shutter speed in this camera. Funny that a blogger already mentions this. What nobody has mentioned though is that the longest shutter speed on this Yashica Electro 35cc is not 8s or 16s. It's 30 seconds! Now, I have to take a few more evening experiment shots ...


2

Here's the frame challenge answer (https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem) You want increased contrast in the end result...this doesn't mean that you need increased contrast in the negative. The negative is simply a means to an end and it should give you the most detail possible so that you have the most amounts of "ends&...


1

You cannot change the contrast of the negative without changing the amount of development. Further, the amount of contrast control available for T-Max films is limited -- only the P3200 is made to accommodate significant changes in contrast ("push") to simulate a 3200 ISO speed (the native speed of that film is about 1000). T-Max 400 has a ...


1

The tank or chems were filthy with residue or the roll had a decaying emulsion. If I saw this in the lab I would immediately clean the equipment and change the chems.


2

If by vintage look you mean grain specifically, then the following are all that matters: Emulsion. Faster films (higher ASA/ISO/etc.) give more grain than slower films due to the way they're manufactured. Developing solution. The chemistry you develop the film in has an effect on the resulting grain. There are acutance-enhancing developers, such as Rodinal, ...


5

There's a reason beginning film photography classes start with: 35mm B&W film. Normal exposure and development. When you know what's normal, you can sort out what factors cause what effects when you experiment with different film types, development processes and formats. what matters most when trying to get this retro look? Anything shot on "...


1

To expand on what user95069 said, it's primarily about the film being used, not the camera. I've taken multiple photos on different cameras on various film stocks, from budget point-and-shoots to automatic SLRs, and the primary factor when it comes to grain is the film and how it's exposed, and the type of camera and lens used has no visible effect on grain. ...


1

Get high ASA (that gives you larger film grain) and underexpose (that makes the grain most visible). It's actually not all that different from digital in that respect, except that the digital results are not as much grainier than they are noisier.


5

This is a coupled rangefinder camera, so the lens attached to it will be rather integrated into the camera mechanics - no chance to hack that camera into anything that can usefully work with fully interchangeable lenses. Wide angle converters or teleconverters that can be adapted to the filter thread would potentially work, as long as they do not shift focus ...


0

If it was leaking before you did the seals and it is always at the same spot then yes it is most likely the damaged area. If you can't seal it on the inside, tape the outside.


0

It was an economic decision and not based on quality. Traditional media spent a fortune on processing, splicing, etc. Digital removed 75% of the cost. 35mm film quality was much higher than digital during the transition. MF was obviously even better but even more expensive. News and magazine image quality is quite low but I do remember a SI swimsuit ...


0

Develop the film. Scan the film with a proper scanner or ask the lab to do it. Note: The film emulsion might peel and flake off during processing if the roll is very old. The lab may insist that it be developed at the end of their day. That way, if it disintegrates, it won't ruin anyone else's film.


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