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Place a thimble full in a thimble size bowl. Cut a sliver of film off the tongue. In the light, swish this sliver in the developer. If it blackens, after a few minutes, likely the developer remains active. Also, expired developer is oxidized and turns dark or even black. This is because the chief ingredient is a close cousin of benzene. As the developer ...


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Sounds like your real question is: Can I use this developer? The answer, of course, is a question: How important are the images to you? If this film is critical and the loss of any images meaningful, then go get new developer; the stuff isn't that expensive. If, however, you are okay with the risk, then read on. Are there precipitates in the liquid or ...


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(Disclaimer 1: This is a bit of a comment-answer, since I'm not terribly confident in it given the information we have so far. But it's too long for a comment.) Could this be inadequate fixing? I.e. one of the following: Insufficient fixing time Fixer working solution too dilute Fixer working solution exhausted (has had too many rolls of film through it) ...


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I think I'm correct in saying that using three filters is impossible. Only because once the third filter is positioned, it allows somewhere upwards of 85% of filter 2's light that was originally blocked. It's some weird light phenomena.


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You can get bulk ECN2 chemicals that are up to spec. Probably cheaper per quantity than using weak kitchen chemicals. The problem with "manually" removing remjet is that it ruins the emulsion...with contains your latent image! All of the DIY advice and Youtube videos will result in ruined film. If whatever method your using recycles the wash, and doesn't ...


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I'm 10 years late here but... in case this helps anyone more generally: Most medium-format cameras from Zenza Bronica would tick most (some even all) of the boxes on your list, and they also benefit from being generally cheaper (and having cheaper lenses) than the competition. Here's a non-exhaustive rundown: Bronica S2(a): early, all-mechanical, nominally ...


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One thing to recall with B&W films: for a given film speed and type (i.e. cubic grain or tabular grain), the development time will be about the same across most if not all manufacturers. That is, Ilford FP4+ and Fomapan 100 have a development time within half a minute of each other in most, if not all, developers (and half a minute out of six or seven ...


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Without empty cores, you're pretty much done before you start. The only real option I see is to take the bulk loader into the darkroom and hand roll a quantity of film that will fit into the loader's supply chamber and thread it in. It'll still work in the loader (I think), though you may find the remjet gets scratched up as it rides on the film's back ...


2

That may be one of the effects of humidity affecting the dyes in the print. These, like original B&W SX70/600 film, are dye prints, rather than direct silver image, but the silver and undeveloped halide are still present. The sensitive layer is roughly similar to Ilford or Kodak C-41 black and white negative films, but the process for integral instant ...


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I've not used a Jobo CPP but perhaps the tank was opened briefly fogging the film? The pattern of marks looks like a projection of the film reel onto the film. Perhaps this was done whilst there was liquid in the tank - hence the abrupt cut off. The only way to solve an issue like this is to repeat it. Just make a single exposure and take it all the way ...


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There's one "color" process that might have produced an image like the one shown (though it appears the negative was "distressed" in some manner as well): that's developing with any of the three developers, C-41, E-6 First Developer, or E-6 Color Developer, then stopping and fixing with non-bleaching fixer (like conventional B&W fixer or C-41 fixer, not ...


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Unload the camera in the usual way, but don't seal the tail on the takeup spool. Put the film roll showing "exposed", and an empty spool, into a changing bag (or take them into a darkroom). Before closing the bag or turning off the lights, put the tail tab from the backing paper into the slot in the empty spool and wind one or two turns to lock the paper ...


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Basic troubleshooting generally starts with what has changed. Your camera has changed, which would point to a camera functionality problem. That said, if it has been some time since you developed film, your developing process or the chemicals themselves could have changed. A control via either new chemicals or developing against a known-to-work camera ...


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The first thing you need to do is eliminate the possibility that it is the camera. Research and test your camera's shutter and light meter to see it is functioning properly and you are using it properly, Take a test roll and have a lab develop it. If the camera is fine AND you have exposed the film properly ( a big if ) then you know it is in the ...


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If you can read the edge markings on the film, your development worked, at least to some extent (half time with Caffenol may be a bit short -- C-41 film in Caffenol will generally come out pretty dense because the orange mask adds to the fog/stain from the coffee). Given this, if your frames are completely clear, your camera's shutter may not have fired, or ...


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Assuming this was B&W or color negative film, the most likely cause of completely clear film (no edge markings, no exposed leader for 35 mm) is mixing up the graduates and pouring the fixer before the developer. It's an easy mistake to make, even (especially) after processing hundreds or thousands of tanks previously. All it takes is an interruption or ...


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I have struggled to google-fu the specs for this particular Kodak so will assume that they are similar to Fuji's version of the camera (https://www.fujifilm.com/products/quicksnap/lineup/superia/). The camera uses a fixed wide angle lens, f/10 or so aperture, and 1/140 shutter speed or so. Keep in mind that you are not looking through the lens. The ...


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Are the frame numbers visible? If they are, processing chemicals and times are fine, but the film was not exposed. If the frame numbers are not visible, whether or not the film was exposed, the processing is at fault - exhausted chemicals or maybe incorrect sequence.


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The point behind shooting a film at box speed and developing with recommended dilutions, agitations, and time is consistency. If your film is properly exposed, then doing everything by the box will yield usable images. Anytime you deviate from the recommended process, you are experimenting. As with all experiments, you should change a single variable at a ...


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I've had my RB67 Pro for a few years now, and have occasionally done long exposures using two separate cable releases. Mamiya's double cable release is no different, as it is virtually a 2-in-1 cable release. You may as well use a hairpin to set off the shutter when the lens is in mirror up mode. So, unfortunately, the only way to close the shutter in T ...


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