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17

Your camera "thought" it had film with an ISO of 400, while in reality it was only 160. So it adjusted it's exposure meter for ISO 400 film, underexposing your film by a bit more than 1 stop. To compensate for this underexposure you need to ask the lab to "overdevelop" your film by 1 1/3 to 1 1/2 stops. This is called push processing. I have no experience ...


14

The orange veil to the right of the last image is a common effect of light fogging. In fact, I've seen that many times on the first frame of 35mm when I started exposing without winding enough frames first. The white fog might be a different sort of light leak, perhaps due to the shutter not being completely closed when you advance film and cock the camera....


9

As you know, a short tapered tongue / leader -- length of film protrudes from the velvet lined mouth of the film cassette. The velvet is a light trap that protects the film in the interior of the cassette from being fogged during the film loading procedure. You would be wise to load and unload in subdued light. In desperation, use your body’s shadow. We ...


7

Are the frame numbers visible? If they are, processing chemicals and times are fine, but the film was not exposed. If the frame numbers are not visible, whether or not the film was exposed, the processing is at fault - exhausted chemicals or maybe incorrect sequence.


7

Either / or It's an entirely mechanical device with a manual wind. It will show the same number whether or not you took that frame yet. The mechanism should prevent you double-exposing (though some cameras have an intentional double exposure setting) but you'll only find that out normally when you try to press the shutter release. That indicator on a film ...


6

The SR-1 was launched in 1959. It’s possible that your copy could be 61 years old! Even if it was stored in an airtight box, oils and greases will break down over that time and become tacky. Add actual use, dirt and dust, and that tacky can become gritty. The result is that functions begin sticking and then eventually freeze. Most people will buy one of ...


6

So if my film ISO is 100, before metering and taking pictures with my camera, shouldn't I dial in 50 ISO on my light meter to compensate for that +1? Yes. You've got it. If your shutter speeds are edging into the seconds, do keep in mind reciprocity failure and the additional time needed to compensate for that as well. But, for general shooting at handheld ...


5

With any type of color photography, the most important thing that will influence the color "look" of your images is the type of light that is illuminating your subject or scene. If you want photos to have a "warmer" look, then use warmer lighting, such as tungsten bulbs, to illuminate your subjects. But sometimes you don't have control of the lighting, ...


5

Here is a quote from the Kodak publication 'Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials': Once you have exposed your film, paper, or material, it is important to minimize changes in the latent (unprocessed) image. For consistent results, process the film, paper, or material promptly after exposure. This is particularly important with ...


5

This is a coupled rangefinder camera, so the lens attached to it will be rather integrated into the camera mechanics - no chance to hack that camera into anything that can usefully work with fully interchangeable lenses. Wide angle converters or teleconverters that can be adapted to the filter thread would potentially work, as long as they do not shift focus ...


5

There's a reason beginning film photography classes start with: 35mm B&W film. Normal exposure and development. When you know what's normal, you can sort out what factors cause what effects when you experiment with different film types, development processes and formats. what matters most when trying to get this retro look? Anything shot on "...


5

Your first image is incredibly underexposed. Grainy + grey/lack of contrast on color negative films is the dead giveaway for underexposure. Your second image looks properly exposed and the color and contrast look to be what I'd expect with Portra 400 shot midday-ish in hard sun. I don't think there is a gear/film issue here. ISO400 film is not fast enough ...


4

The recessed board helps in focusing a very short focal lenght enlarging lens (say 30mm, the kind used for enlarging 110 film). A short lens requires such a short distance from the film plane that the bellows extended to minimum would still not suffice, and had to be recessed. This was common issue only for lenses for smaller format that 35mm, which was ...


4

I'm 10 years late here but... in case this helps anyone more generally: Most medium-format cameras from Zenza Bronica would tick most (some even all) of the boxes on your list, and they also benefit from being generally cheaper (and having cheaper lenses) than the competition. Here's a non-exhaustive rundown: Bronica S2(a): early, all-mechanical, nominally ...


4

Usually an analogue camera does not create a double exposure when pressing the shutter again, without advancing the film. The film advance process also cocks the shutter mechanism. So if the film isn't advanced, nothing happens. There are cameras that have a special feature to do double exposures, by allowing you to re-cock the shutter without advancing the ...


4

Say I wanted the final result to be a print that displayed only (or all but) the green elements in a color photo. What are some ways I could go about producing it? If you are working with digital images (after scanning your film), you can use the channel mixer. It may take some thought and calculation to figure out what percentages to use for each channel. ...


4

It appears ( possibly, it is hard to tell ) to me that the leader is no longer smooth and has been hand cut. Sometimes I have film loaded in my camera of an ASA that is not right for the light that I find myself wanting to photograph in, so I rewind it back just enough to leave the leader out of the cassette. I may want to develop what I have shot on the ...


4

I presume they're referring to the (obsolete) Positive/Negative black and white Polaroids, Type 55 (and one of the 3x4 pack films). We'd normally speak of "clearing" the negative from these films after peeling the print off, in order to keep the negative in condition to use for scanning or darkroom printing. This involves putting the negative, as soon as ...


4

The technical term for the surface coated with photographic emulsion is, I believe, substrate or (slightly less generically) film base. Historical substrates Paper (calotype) Metal (tintype) Glass (e.g. in the collodion process) Cellulose nitrate (early films; very flammable!) Current substrates Cellulose acetate ("safety film") Polyester (some ...


4

A more obscure substance that has been used to develop film prints is algae: “Algae grows faster when it receives more light, so algae under a bright spot in the image multiplied faster, and thus became darker, inverting the negative and creating a green-tinted positive image,” Marx explains. Read more at this link: https://petapixel.com/2020/05/12/this-...


4

After finding very similar pictures of leaks online, and talking to an experienced repair guy, I found out that the leak is caused by an improperly closing auxiliary shutter. The Hasselblad V series has two flaps on the back of the body, which need to make a proper seal together to prevent light that is coming through the viewfinder from reaching the film ...


4

While in the roll the film is still light sensitive, so if you removed the film and exposed it to light the images probably would be destroyed (as the film would be over exposed). The film needs to be developed (chemical process that both makes the image visible and turns off the light sensitivity of the film) before it can be scanned. There are still labs ...


4

The C-41 and E-6 processes and their cine counterparts evolved in an era where giant regional processing labs were the norm. I was technical manager for 7 such labs in the Southeast United States. Each was sized to handle 20,000 rolls of color film a day. Such labs as these were duplicated in countless locals worldwide. Regardless of what you think, the vast ...


4

I don't think anyone has answered the actual question: in all mechanical cameras I've seen, and most electronic ones, the counter counts up, from 1 (or 0, on some cameras) at the beginning of the roll, and always shows the currently available frame after advancing, or the most recently exposed before. These frames are determined by the way the camera's ...


3

Assuming this was B&W or color negative film, the most likely cause of completely clear film (no edge markings, no exposed leader for 35 mm) is mixing up the graduates and pouring the fixer before the developer. It's an easy mistake to make, even (especially) after processing hundreds or thousands of tanks previously. All it takes is an interruption or ...


3

This camera has a very basic film winding mechanism. My first guess. It could be that the button that you push to release the film in order to rewind the film got pushed while in the bag (releasing the the take-up spool) and this allowed the film in the canister, which is under tension, to pull the film backwards and the counter with it. I believe the ...


3

Well, first up, any film that is not in the can already is now junk. Film is sensitive to light, after all, and we measure exposures in fractions of a second during the day. Cracking the back to see what's going on cannot be done fast enough to not overexpose to oblivion. Any frames that were successfully rewound back into the can will be okay and can be ...


3

In general, Color Negative film is designed to be overexposed. Most can handle 1 stop over with no perceptible difference and things can look just fine up to +3 or +4 depending on the film. However, they can also start looking like garbage at as little as -1 under. This is why people say that it "likes to be shot at 200" - doing so forces you to be at ...


3

There are three likely causes of this kind of mark on the film. First, bromide drag from insufficient agitation. Second, surge marks from excessive agitation. Neither one is very likely for film developed by a commercial lab, though they're certainly a possibility. The third possibility is a light leak -- not in the camera, but in the cassette, ...


3

There are several ways to go beyond a Grade 5 contrast, but they're all well beyond ordinary printing. First, you can gain up to about a half grade, in some cases, by switching print developers -- unfortunately, the most common developers, like Dektol, are already the higher contrast sort. Second, you could make a copy negative. Using either ortho lith film ...


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