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6

Every service I'm aware of that produces large format prints from film will initially scan your film into a digital file anyway. Cutting out the middle man will allow you to use a color-managed workflow and most likely produce better outcomes. That being said, you can either go with a service that performs digital to film conversion for the film industry (...


4

The real tell here is the negative: The effect terminates with the edge of the frame. That means it can only be a light leak, somehow. Whether it is in the film back or in the camera itself, something is letting light in. It might be the finder, but I'll be honest- it doesn't look like anything I'd expect to see. I almost wondered if it was 'glow in the dark'...


4

Real film scanners scan color negatives by increasing the exposure time of the blue and green channels (relative to the red channel). This is an analog operation, similar to using color filters in the dark room to filter out the orange and print on paper. There is no clipping due to this analog shift. Digital cameras cannot do those exposures, and must ...


4

The answer is YES: The C-41 color developer is a typical (non-staining) black & white developer. Its job is to differentiate between exposed and non-exposed silver salts present on the film. The developer then goes to work on the exposed silver salts. They are reduced to their two component parts which are silver and an halogen (Iodine – chlorine – ...


3

Appears to me that the rollers that crush the developer pod and distribute the developer as the film is being ejected are either misaligned or the film pack isn't seated properly. Pull the pack and make sure all of the rollers are moving freely and that there isn't any crud on them or in the film path...


3

Anything past one second, whether in a single exposure or over several multiple exposures of the same piece of film, are subject to what is known as reciprocity failure. It's also called the Schwarzschild effect after the man who extensively studied it in the 1890s, Karl Schwarzschild. The sensitivity of films at longer exposure times is not linear. This ...


3

Film has an exposure curve. I'm guessing that when you are combining many multiples the amount of light is insufficient to generate any real density (you are on the heel/bottom of the curve). For your simple division method to work you need to be w/in the linear response region.


3

You probably could, with some experimentation. However, C41 chemicals are a lot fussier and a lot more expensive than black-and-white chemistry. For only a few dollars (or your equivalent currency), you could buy proper chemicals for black-and-white work, and have well-tested, useful information as to the proper parameters (dilution, development time and ...


2

I have access to a T-22 (similar to T-43). The flange focal distance is very short. It can be used as a close-up or macro lens on SLRs, but will not be able to focus to infinity. Teleconverters are designed to work with lenses that have FFD that match your camera. Since the T-43 has a shorter FFD, it's unlikely to work. I tried the T-22 with an OM mount ...


2

Sadly, your film was fogged. "Fogging" is where the film is inadvertently or deliberately exposed to light prior to development. It can be a light leak within the camera, the felt leader area could be damaged, or it could have faced 'up' in the sun. It's also possible to be chemically fogged or heat fogged, but those are rarer and require much more work to ...


2

@ cube --- As to your question -- How optical color darkroom practices deal with the Evans Integral Orange Mask? The C-41 color negative film process utilizes dyes incorporated in the film during manufacture. There are three, cyan (blue + green), magenta (red + blue) and yellow. The dyes in the film are incomplete. During the developing process, a black &...


1

A software application is used to control a (film) scanner - whether it is the manufacturer's supplied software or a third-party application like VueScan or SilverFast. When you select in the software settings that the film type being scanned is colour negative film, then the software "neutralises" the cast from the orange mask. Some scan software allows you ...


1

Keep film Dark, Cold, Dry, and Deep. And Chemical-Free. Dark: Obvious. Can not have ANY light exposure or the film will be ruined in patches (or entirely). It's actually very hard to thoroughly ruin a roll of film from top/down or accidental exposure- maybe the top or bottom sprockets get ruined, or a couple of wraps of film from the roll (10, 15 feet) are ...


1

Film is perishable. Store in a wrapping that protects the film from light. Wrap in several layers of aluminum foil. This will shield the film from light and humidity. A metal box will add an extra layer of protection. Store a freezer. Handle the unwrapped film in a room known to be light proof. Pre-test the work area by sitting inside for 15 minutes. This ...


1

As Fuji's marketing sheet states, the film is processed in ECN-2. If it is not often mentioned, it is probably because it is just as obvious, that colour negative cinema film is processed in ECN-2, as it is that still film is processed in C-41.


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The answer by osullic touches on some excellent points. This depends on whether the anti-halation layer is still present at the time of shooting or not and the chemistry the film will be developed in. I'll add some thoughts under the assumption that there is no other choice than to shoot at ISO 400 or 800 and DX hacking, manual ISO setting and exposure ...


1

For what it is worth: The noise pattern you've got looks a lot like matte beads. These are micro-plastic beads added to film emulsions to keep the emulsion 'bumpy' and not sticking to film/scanner/print. It's only on the gelatin side, not the base, and depending on the light source can significantly become visible. Since the beads are chosen NOT to be ...


1

Worse, no fixer is currently been on that film. You need to wet the film with photo flo, rinse with water, and reprocess it with chemical fixer to remove the residual silver. That will leave blank patches but will prevent the film from damaging itself in time. So basically reload that strip (or just stick it in a small tank- doesn't have to be light tight) ...


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