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I get reasonably good results photographing negatives with a slide copier attachment and a macro lens (vs using a flatbed scanner). However, if you plan to scan many frames of film, you should consider a dedicated film scanner with batch feeder. Depending on your lens and camera, image quality from a film scanner may or may not be better, but it would be ...


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In the case of a film scanner, an IT-8 target is a slide of known colours that you scan, and then you use software to analyse the scanned image to compare with those known colours. This characterises the colour-reading ability of your particular device, and allows a customised colour profile to be generated that can be applied to subsequent scans of positive ...


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The Nikon scanners do not require regular maintenance. They are however quite prone to dirt and dust. Your best bet keeping the scanner running problem free for a long time is to store it in a clean place (wrapped in a cover) when not in use. Some units are also starting to show signs of age and may e.g. have problems with the lubrication drying out. They ...


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It sounds like you are new to scanning. Hope this helps. 1) With any high res scan, choose to save as Tiff in the maximum bit depth that your editing software will handle. Probably 32 or 48 bit. With black and white, 16 bit is sufficient. 2) You must decide what size scan you want to produce before you set your resolution and output size. I find ...


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This is what I would start with. You'll likely have to tweak settings to fit your specific needs. The main setting to disable is Digital ICE. The silver in B&W film interferes with its function. Original: Document Type and Film Type – These probably just set some reasonable defaults. What you've selected seems appropriate (Film, B&W Negative). Scan ...


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