18

You changed from sRGB to Adobe RGB1998? It's apparently the naming convention. It surprised me too when I did the same thing. From my D5500 manual... Photographs are saved using file names consisting of “DSC_” or, in the case of images that use the Adobe RGB color space (0 243), “_DSC”, followed by a four-digit number and a three- letter extension (...


16

This comes down to software patents — not on dates, but in a way that limits filenames. The only filesystem which is widely available and cross-platform is FAT, the venerable Microsoft DOS filesystem. It works on both old and new versions of Windows, worked on OS/2, works on Macs, works on Linux, and there are plenty of embedded implementations for the mini ...


12

ExifTool is a cross-platform tool which will work from the Windows command line. It is very powerful, with a perl-based syntax allowing comparison of various metadata. In a directory full of JPEG files, this command will print a list of all files where the beginning of the filename does not match the year from the date-taken EXIF value: exiftool -d "%Y" -...


11

ExifTool is pretty much the Swiss army chainsaw for doing these kinds of things. It has a steep learning curve, but once you're over it, the kind of renaming you're after is a snap: exiftool -d '%Y%m%d-%H%M%%-03.c.%%e' '-filename<CreateDate' . The -d switch tells ExifTool to format dates according to the next argument's pattern. The pattern contains ...


8

You can actually have them come out with proceeding zeros in Lightroom. When you go to export, find the File Naming category. From there, make sure "Rename to" is checked and hit the drop down box. Select the last option "Edit...". A box should come up allowing you to enter a formula for how files are named. For numeric sequences it should look something ...


7

Page 162 in the manual. Go to the Custom Settings menu and change option d4, "File Number Sequence", to On. When this option is off, filenames are reset when you change exposure or reformat the card. With it on, they continue where you left off. An option to reset the count is also available in the same menu.


7

The reason most cameras don't store files by data and time is simply because no one wrote the code in the camera's software to do so. One possible reason nobody wrote that code is that the date/time format is illegal according to the DCF standard that describes how cameras should store images for compatibility with other cameras, viewing devices and ...


5

I don't think there is a field in the metadata which explicity defines the crop aspect ratio, but there are plenty of other fields which you could use instead; e.g. 'Instructions' where you could manually add the aspect ratio. You can use 'Sync (metadata)' to apply a crop ratio to the relevant images to avoid typing it in more than once. Then just add '...


5

You can do this Apply your filter in the library module, Select all photos Select "File Menu/Export as catalog..." Click "Export selected photos only" (This doesnt export the photos, only the metadata) , uncheck the other checkboxes Choose an appropriate filename for the .lrcat file, save it, (optionally use the .sqlite extension) Open the .lrcat file in ...


5

For simple things where the flexibility, power, and complication of ExifTool aren't necessary, I like to use the tool jhead. It's a command-line tool available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. jhead -n%Y%m%d-%H%M%S *.jpg will automatically rename all files ending in .jpg in the current directory to a format like 20181226-111141.jpg. You can use %f to also ...


4

You have to change the SETUP > SAVE DATA SET-UP > FRAME NO. menu setting from CONTINUOUS to RENEW. If it's set to RENEW, then the numbering will reset to 0001 when you format the card or use a new one. See: http://fujifilm-dsc.com/en/manual/x-t10/menu_setup/save_data_set-up/index.html


3

Renaming file do not change the content of the file. So you should not be afraid of this. Renaming of the file is operation, related to the metainformation of your picture, stored in the filesystem and it is not related to the content of the file itself


3

It's mainly about file name lengths at the time the Design Rules for Camera File Systems was developed. Many operating systems in widespread usage at that time did not allow file names long enough to accommodate date/time stamps with enough detail to differentiate, for example, two images taken within the same minute, much less the same second. There's also ...


3

I don't think you can on the Rebel series. The 7D got the option to set the prefix with a firmware update this summer, and I think it's been in the higher end models for a while. And I may be mistaken but I don't think the Magic Lantern firmware hack addresses this. But that's not the end of things. As part of my workflow, I use a script for reading files ...


3

Sadly, this seems to no longer be possible. Posting an answer with the workaround I'm going with, though, so I can "accept" something (because I don't quite want to go with the other answer that's been given yet - though it does present other viable workarounds that some could use, and I welcome other answers, if folks have them): Instead of doing a "...


3

There's no way to assign a date-based filename on-camera. However, there are quite a few pieces of software that will help do just this when ingesting photos from the memory card to your computer, giving you the ability to define your preferred file name, folder structure, and assorted metadata, too, such as Adobe Lightroom and Camera Bits Photo Mechanic.


3

As this style of file naming is quite common in phone cameras, I'm going to hazard a guess that it came from such a device. 8Mpix seems reasonable for this. My Sony phone uses a more conventional naming scheme as shot but a format rather like this if I edit on the phone (the date in that case is the edit date) Going a step further, how about a windows ...


3

Simple answer: you can't prove anything. A (digital) photo is just a sequence of ones and zeros (bits) on a disk somewhere, and anyone with enough time, money and dedication could get those bits to say anything they wanted.


3

There is no option to change the file name in camera. Users can only change the file number sequence method, as @Tetsujin noted. For the record: In Setup Menu, change File Number Sequence to On. The camera will continuously number images and give them all a unique filename. After 999 images, use the Reset option in File Number Sequence to go back to 001. ...


2

Although this has been asked some time back, but since no response is marked as Answer I offer this. Maybe the solution is to use the semicolon behind the Model to remove invalid characters > model; exiftool '-filename<%f_${model;}.%e' dir Rename all files in dir by adding the camera model name to the file name. The semicolon after the tag name ...


2

Try this: exiftool '-FileName<${CreateDate}_${Exif:Model}.jpg' -d %Y%m%d_%H%M%S-%%2c * or this exiftool '-FileName<${CreateDate}_${Exif:Model}_${filename}' -d %Y%m%d_%H%M%S *


2

A donationware plug-in called LR/Transporter can do this according to its change log: Version 4.24, 20th September 2011 Added new tokens to retrieve the full path name of the original image files (only available on Lightroom 3 or higher). Many of you have been asking for this for years, but we've only just noticed that Lightroom 3 finally gives ...


2

I'm not sure it is possible to do exactly what you want formatting the card in camera without modifying the code in the camera's firmware, but here are two possible workarounds that might work for you. 1) To the best of my knowledge recent Canon DSLR bodies in the xD series starting with the 7D in 2009 allow the user to change the image name prefix. The ...


2

You should be able to do this by setting option d8 in the Custom Menu to RESET, then doing your renaming on the computer trick. From the D7000 manual: RESET: As for On, except that the next photograph taken is assigned a file number by adding one to the largest file number in the current folder. If the folder is empty, file numbering is reset to ...


2

You can't do it in camera because it would be an exception to the DCIM naming standards which the camera follows. As far as after the fact, I use the multi-rename feature of Total Commander for my bulk file rename operations. It's technically a shareware product, so you can try it and use it for that for free. It's really worth buying though cause it is ...


2

Since you asked why: the reason for this is that the files on the camera are stored using a very simple filesystem using 8.3 file names, which by default are upper-case (originally these filesystems didn't distinguish between upper and lower case in filenames). There's an option in Linux (shortname=lower) that can be used when mounting the USB storage which ...


2

You need a 3rd party plug-in like LR Mogrify 2. Despite the text on its homepage, it is compatible with current versions of Lightroom.


2

JPEGsnoop compares the compression signature in a JPEG with its database of known signature/software combinations, and gives a list of software that matches the signature of the input image. I just tried it with this image, and JPEGsnoop 1.7.0 gave me: *** Searching Compression Signatures *** Signature: 013BA18D5561625796E986FDBC09F846 ...


2

It's not a failure, it's a setting in the camera menu. I've never used this camera but according to page 133 of the user manual, you set the image folder name setting to Standard instead of Date: You can change the image folder name from the standard name to the date that pictures were taken. When the name is changed to the date, pictures are saved in ...


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