34

Things to consider when thinking of purchasing your first dSLR. 1. Can I afford a dSLR? If you've never used an interchangeable lens camera system before, realize that the cost is astronomical in comparison with fixed-lens cameras, because the camera body itself is just the start of your purchases and the basis of your system. It is also (weirdly) the most ...


22

What is this red dot next to the viewfinder and live view button on the Canon EOS Rebel T6 (1300D)? A red dot is a common symbol for the record function, and as on other EOS bodies that button serves the dual purpose of starting Live View mode and starting and stopping movie recording. The icon on the button itself is the Live View icon, and I think the red ...


18

As a fairly generic answer, I'd go for an older higher level camera every time. To me, higher spec cameras tend to have a longer life span (in terms of shutter actuations), and more solid build than entry level ones. Although saying that it is more likely that they have had heavier use before getting to you. I reckon also that features and specs of high end ...


14

In my opinion it boils down to two factors (assuming you mean DSLRs in the low- and mid-range): Higher level cameras give you more features and more control than entry level cameras. Newer cameras have better low-light capability than older cameras (and generally better image quality due to technological advancement). Given an amount of money you balance ...


12

A mirrorless is a system camera and you must therefore carefully consider the system. There 2 major differenciators between systems: Sensor-size: This affects image quality and particularly low-light performance. Four-Thirds and APS-C are popular sizes but there are full-frame options and smaller 1" or 1/1.7" ones too which have noticeably lower image-...


11

The direct replacement for the 1300D (the Rebel T6 in the USA) is the 2000D (Rebel T7 in the USA), which is an incremental improvement over the 1300D; the 4000D represents a new model line below, and consequently even cheaper than, the 1000D/1100D/1200D/1300D/2000D line. This can also been seen in the launch price of the cameras: the 1300D and 2000D both ...


10

What you're missing is that most compact cameras will use an electronic viewfinder, rather than an optical one, if they have a viewfinder at all. Apparently a lot of folks don't mind composing and shooting from an LCD screen on the back of the camera. The Powershot G's viewfinder has several drawbacks. It can be blocked by an accessory tube. It only shows ...


8

Power Focus is described on Canon's Infobank page as "a mode that allows you to drive the autofocus motor electronically instead of having to use the focus ring." As you indicate in your question, it's meant for changing focus from one point to another very smoothly, for use while shooting video. As one doesn't normally change focus in the middle of taking ...


8

Are optical viewfinders on point and shoot cameras now dead? Probably, yeah. I notice that in the 2011 answer to the other question you link, Itai suggests that they were then a "dying breed", and that seems to have become completely true. I did a search on Digital Photography Review's database of all compact cameras with any type of optical finder, and — ...


7

So, I recently bought a used camera. To decide which to buy, I developed this technique: Make a list of all features that are important to you. Assign a point value from 1-10 to each feature. Give a 10 to something essential, a 1 to something that barely matters. Write down the stat for the feature for all of the cameras that you are interested in. Give no ...


7

I would recommend taking a look at the Nikon D800 manual which can be found online here. Page 207 of the manual describes the features of the D800 and time lapse photography. You also will want to pay particular notice to the tips of the bottom of page 209 where it describes what modes time-lapse does not work in. If you have a question beyond something ...


7

To bluntly answer the question: "Why not enable it by default?" The obvious answer is "because it has drawbacks". Otherwise it would be enabled by default :). Looking at this article from Canon directly explaining the option for the 1DMkIII and 1DSMkIII, then at this one for the 7D, I think we can safely say that the effect will vary depending on the camera ...


7

Usual Basics Just as with dSLRs, you will want to consider the following "main" features of a camera system in addition to any gee-whiz features you find sexy: Sensor size and resolution (affects noise performance, and lens size/speed--the larger the sensor, the bigger/slower the lenses are liable to be to keep the system compact). Overall system breadth (...


6

You can take amazing photographs with any camera. The trick is to know and understand your equipment. An older professional camera might be more rugged and durable, but might have lower resolution or light sensitivity. It really depends on the specific cameras you are comparing. A few years ago I was dead set on buying a used 5DMk2 because I wanted a full-...


6

In order to allow the camera to make less noise, the speed the mirror is moved out of the light box and/or the speed the shutter is reset for each shot is slowed down. This increases shutter lag and decreases the maximum number of frames per second. Sometime the maximum frame rates is more important, regardless of the noise produced by a camera. I doubt ...


4

Ultrasonic motor (USM) in this case should not be associated with human being audible frequency. I do not think the lens manufacturer builds it for the reason of no noise during operation, but the advanced simpler control of the lens movement by using the sinusoidal electric wave at the ultrasonic range frequency. Ultrasonic motor is low speed and high ...


4

I had to decide the same thing a short time ago, whether to go for a D7000 vs any other camera. The only restriction was that it had to be Nikon because I owned a couple of Nikon fit lenses that I wanted to reuse. First of take a look at: http://snapsort.com/compare/Nikon-D5200-vs-Nikon_D7000 http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d7000.htm The D7000 is Nikon'...


4

While Philip's answer talks about why you cannot compare cameras of different levels with each other without considering their price (in short: the 2000D is the successor to the 1300D, while the 4000D is a line even below the 1300D/2000D line), I want to answer the question: Are they not supposed to make entry level cameras good/better so more and more ...


3

Here's the problem with automatic Depth of Field (DoF) calculations: The camera doesn't know the intended display size and viewing distance. These two factors determine the acceptable circle of confusion from which DoF is then calculated. The same exact image file will have different Depth of Field when displayed at different sizes and viewed from the same ...


3

What are the benefits of having one more leg section? Being I am 175 cm tall, I will never use the legs fully extended on a plane. More sections reduces the length of the tripod while folded. This is most desirable for travelling. As a side-effect, there is a slight loss of rigidity since the extra tube is more narrow and maybe a more time to setup. ...


3

Check battery life. Sometimes, in order to keep the camera size small, manufacturers use batteries that do not last very long Check if your selected camera can reuse your existing equipment like good quality lenses from your previous DSLR, flashes, chargers etc. This can not only save some money when getting a new system, but also saves space when traveling ...


3

Arbitrary Release Time Lag is a new feature that Canon introduced to minimize camera shake due to mirror movement in a DSLR. In the past, savvy users have used the 2-second self-timer with mirror lockup enabled or similar techniques to achieve sharp results. The new feature gives a bit more flexibility with varying delays(1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, or 2 second). ...


3

Yes it does. This falls under full manual-controls on most review sites. You can tell this by simply looking at photos of the G15 and noting the positions on the mode-dial. The one labbeled A means you can select aperture while leaving the shutter-speed automatic and the M means that you can adjust both independently. The G15 also happens to have dual ...


3

The MASK/ALT Feature MASK/ALT defines groups and a firing sequence for those groups for multiple lights. Successive presses of the shutter will fire a different group of lights each time. All lights must be in M mode. It's called MASK/ALT because it's often used to create freeze masks, and because the firing alternates/rotates between the groups. On the ...


2

The biggest questions are what are your required features, and what are the generational differences. Feature requirements can help make it easy to decide what to buy. Deciding between an old pro camera and a new entry-level camera, but want an integrated vertical grip? The pro camera is the only sensible choice. Require a camera the other half won't mind ...


2

The new, entry level camera will likely have better hardware and software than the older, higher level camera. But the higher level camera will likely have a bigger sensor. The higher level camera will be built with a professional or pro-sumer in mind. It is not easy to find an older higher-level camera (new OR used) at a price that is even close to a new ...


2

My first DSLR was a used Canon 30D. I was considering something like this vs. a new Rebel, and I'm convinced I made the right decision. The 30D was so much better in build quality and durability, and it had extra controls for all the settings I found I needed to change regularly (vs. finding a setting in a menu somewhere). It served me well until I traded ...


2

I'll assume a $1000 budget. Adjust as required. The best entry level DSLR is probably the good quality well known brand one that you determine will help you achieve what you want. All the top name brands perform well enough to start with and to learn on, there are some differences and some features that may suit you better, but without a personal "fitting" ...


2

Feathering light means you use that area of tonal transition from the highlights to the shadows created by the edge of the light modifier. The technique is most easy to achieve with softboxes and beauty dishes because there’s a sharply defined edge to the modifier itself. That’s also why feathering light with most lighting brollies is less effective because ...


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