Hot answers tagged

9

I can think of several ways you could use it... backdrop: If the creative directory wants two looks with the same model in the same clothes, shooting both at the same time could save some time. Just because you're on a beach doesn't mean that every shot has to include the beach. lighting modifier: Shooting with the screen out of view but close to the model ...


6

I made this a public wiki so we can keep a master list Work from a printed checklist. Especially with gathering all the raw-material images, make sure you get everything. Shoot the model with a mild telephoto lens even if you want wide-angle overall, and composite. Shoot to plan on compositing: shallow DoF makes it easy to use select in focus in Photoshop. ...


6

Sorry, but there are no "best settings" - if there were, then the camera wouldn't have other ones. You need to understand the exposure triangle and know the compromises you make when you change any of them.


6

Photography is not (necessarily) about giving the viewer a "as you would see it"-perspective. Photography is about offering additional perspectives. If this was not true, the only good photos would be with roughly the same angle of view that the human eyes give us, shot at eye-height. This, however, is not true. I would even go as far as to say: Those are ...


5

Since it is not clear which part of the look you want to recreate... First, you need to shoot with a shallow depth of field (as already mentioned), and at 50mm to 85mm. A prime lens will work best, but just keep your aperture as low as it can get in the lens you have. That will give you the general feel. In terms of processing, there are a few things going ...


5

it's not a necessary step at all but it is popular especially on pictures of women and especially for lifestyle and fashion shots as it covers up wrinkles and bad skin. you're right though - it can be overdone to an extent that the skin looks flat. i think in portraiture a little glow is good though as it does glamourise the shot.


5

There are a few ways to deal with moiré and none of them is a guarantee in every situation: Moiré adjustment tool/brush/filter in your post processing tool(or manual techniques with similar impact, manually blur areas of the image with moiré) Stop down your aperture to introduce diffraction Use a higher resolution sensor Have the model use a different ...


5

Any zoom lens with a 7.5X or 10X or greater ratio between the minimum and maximum focal length is going to compromise optical quality in several areas to get to that focal length flexibility. These include overall sharpness, geometric distortion, vignetting, sharpness at certain focal lengths, narrower maximum apertures, etc. While it is true that many of ...


4

It is not required to take your professional further. What will take your career farther is a happy client. A good deal of blemish/wrinkles etc. can be taking care of by lighting direction and quality. However, pride is a big part of photography and if your subject wants wrinkles to disappear, then away they go. I try to take care of this in a client ...


4

A lot depends on which 24-70mm f/2.8 lens you are comparing to the EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS. There are three very good 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses you could consider: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II This lens is the most expensive at a little over $2,000 U.S., but is the sharpest from 24mm all the way to 70mm at f/2.8. At the wide end where you want to use it there isn't ...


4

This is another of those cases where the real answer is a lot more complicated than telling you a lens to buy. Fashion photography in particular is very strongly about staging. Even if you're using natural light, you will need to learn to understand and control that light. For many beginners, bad experience with cheap on-camera flash drives an aversion to ...


4

Two reasons that jumps right out at me are size and weight. A 70-200 is pretty big, especially with a hood. To a new model, I bet it's downright intimidating. Hold that 70-200 for long, and you'll start to feel it in your hand and wrist, too. An 85mm easily solves both of those problems, assuming you want to shoot at 85.


4

It's much easier to get a realistic looking background in camera. It's much easier to get a nice looking background in Photoshop. Some people's philosophy is to do as much as possible in camera and leave Photoshop out of the equation or only only as a last resort. Some people's philosophy is to get the highest quality results possible using whatever tools ...


4

There's nothing wrong with the existing answers - but my thought is that essentially you're going to be learning on the job which is going to bring its own set of issues anyway. I'd say, yes, rent a lens, but don't rent one in the range you already have, unless you've got a fair amount of money to throw at it. You are also going to need some soft ...


3

Those two good lenses will handle the resolution, once stopped down to an optimal aperture. This is around F/5.6 on the Nikkor and F/4 on the Zeiss. Do test it out before going to your shoot. 2 stop down from wide-open is a rule-of-thumb, many quality lenses need less. The most important for your close up shots though is the magnification as you will lose ...


3

If you want the sharpest result, get the 24-70f/2.8 II or the 70-200f/2.8 IS II (whichever is appropriate for your needs). They are the two sharpest zoom lenses Canon has ever made and are possibly two of the sharpest zoom lenses in the world right now. I own both and have found them to both perform exceptionally. If cost is a factor, you could consider ...


2

Don't forget that a lot of models are shooting TFP - time for prints. On their end they need shots that compete with all of the other models in portfolios, who have had such smoothing applied... Like you, I think most softening is overdone. I like to apply a light amount of softening so generally smooth out small imperfections while leaving overall ...


2

It's certainly the fastest way to hide blemishes and make skin look smoother, but overdone it does make it look flat. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the look, but I think expediency might be part of it. It is a lot more difficult to go in and fix blemishes by hand while maintaining the detail level without making it obvious that manipulations were made. ...


2

Without knowing for sure of course, but it looks like the D&G shoot used at least a large soft box to the upper left of frame. I say large because the shadows are fairly soft and there is a lot of fairly even lighting on the subjects. The photos you received look to be set up the same, only with a smaller light source. You can observe this by noting ...


2

By now, you've likely discovered that both lenses are capable of providing adequate image resolution on the D810. Only technique and execution are going to hold one back in this area. One thing not mentioned by any other answer is how to test lens vs camera resolution without resorting to specialized tests or equipment (such as imatest). Zeiss has an ...


2

Primes nearly always outperform zooms for distortion and sharpness at a given focal point as their construction is generally simpler with fewer optical elements in the light path. Zooms are, by nature, compromised as they have to be able to provide different focal lengths with as low distortion as possible, and this entails some fairly complex optical ...


2

No, it is pretty much the other way around... can the camera sensor resolve the lens detail? Digital cameras have always had anti-aliasing filters because they simply cannot resolve the finest detail from the lens. They suffer moire if the sampling is not AT LEAST double the detail level (Nyquist), which it has not been... so the cameras have required AA ...


2

As much as I want to mention the Jarvie window technique, I have to concede that basically it is macro shooting; fisheye lens, very close distance to subject (a foot or less from the lens). It's just a distorted or effect portrait, but it has lots of the normal macro characteristics. Other than the Jarvie window technique, I've seen several professional ...


2

That's the reason: to shoot a fashon runway performance. This is event photography. This is not a studio. You have models running around, an audience that watches them, etc. One rule of thumb in event photography is: The photographer doing his/her job is not really part of the show. You should not get in the way of what's happening. For normal ...


2

My guess is that the ring light you saw on that TV show was just being used as a prop and the actor "photographer" had no idea what a ring light is used for. Yes, it is reasonable to use a ring flash or ring light for non-Macro photography. It is a realistic thing to see from a Pro but only in some situations. Many Pro's use ring lights for fashion ...


2

The saturation looks to be decreased a bit, but I don't think low saturation is the right description. There's plenty of color here even if they're not especially bright shades. If saturation were increased more than a little, the model would look oddly orange: In a truly low saturation image he would look more washed out: I think some of the keys here are ...


2

This look is primarily about the choice of lighting. Compared to typical headshots and family portraits the light here is very 'hard.' What that means is that the photographer has chosen a small light source that casts very crisp shadows. You can see this by looking at how sharp the shadow cast from his arm onto his jacket is. Larger light sources like soft ...


1

You need not worry; most lenses are up to the task. Some lenses are better than others, generally you get what you pay for. Every lens is afflicted with defects that force substandard results. There are seven major defects that result in substandard performance. Spherical Aberration Coma Aberration Astigmatism Curvature of field Distortion Longitudinal ...


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