27

Because the Canon EF mount lens "expects" to be further from the sensor than a Sony E mount lens; this is known as the flange focal distance or the registration distance - a Canon EF lens focuses the incoming light on a plane 44mm behind the lens, while a Sony E lens focuses it on a plane 18mm behind the lens. If you somehow bodged it horribly so that a ...


17

The extension tube does change the field of view. Specifically, it enlarges the image circle size at the sensor/film plane. Light as it is projected by the rear of the lens onto the film/sensor plane is like the light coming out of a projector: the further away the screen is, the larger the image that is projected. Since the sensor/film does not expand as ...


6

With a certain distance to the subject, it is in focus at a certain distance to the image sensor. As you move closer to the lens, the place it is in focus moves back. this is because the lens property to bend light is in principle fixed and as you move closer, you change the incoming angles. Naturally, something has to compensate for this, and the distance ...


6

Why don't lens mount adapters have the same effect as extension tubes? They do. But whether it limits far-focus capability depends on one factor: the difference in distances from the image plane to the back of the lens mount flange between the two systems. If the adapted lens's mount is deeper than the camera's mount, the adapter tube can make up the ...


5

The DoF calculators won't work well here, unless they are specifically designed to handle these extremely short distances. To calculate DoF for macro distances you can use magnification-based formula DOF = 2*N*c*((m/P+1)/m*m) Where N is f-number, c is circle of confusion (typically 0.025 mm or 0.001 in), m is magnification and P is pupil magnification. ...


5

Just to add one thing to already posted answers: If you are going to do a really serious macro photography then you can not only forget about autofocus but in fact you can forget about manual focus as well. You will hate autofocus because it will introduce delay and your shutter will fire too late. Also it will never focus on exactly what you want. ...


5

Absolutely, I've done this. The image does get dimmer though so you'll need to adjust your exposure accordingly. I've only toyed with it since much of my interest is in wide, not tele photography.


5

As you focus a lens, you are changing the distance lens to sensor (or film). The job of the lens is to refract (bend inward) light rays incoming from the subject. This alters their path so that the rays now trace out a shape that resembles a cone. As you focus, you are moving the lens towards or away from the senor or film. Focus is achieved when the apex of ...


5

The only option to focus is to change the distance to the subject. Basically, yes. Is there any existing workaround? A. Some rails are indeed one workaround rather than moving the tripod. There are some simpler models, like just a sliding plate on the head, like this one of the same brand. B. Some other has some sliding bellows for both elements, the ...


4

Indeed the EXIF data records the use of a teleconverter. see the attached picture. Here is a screenshot of the EXIF data of a photo as displayed by Apple Aperture. The labels are in German, but the values speak for themselves. The picture was taken using a 200mm lens with the Canon 1.4x teleconverter (II), the resulting focal length of 280mm is recorded.


4

When I use a third party teleconverter with a Canon lens, the EXIF records the lens only in the Lens field, but the actual Av and Focal Length are correctly recorded. The EXIF info below is from a shot taken at maximum aperture and focal length of an EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II + Kenko C-AF 2X Teleplus Pro 300. As you can see the aperture is recorded as f/5.6 ...


4

Ultimately, we decided to use a Nikon BR-6 Auto Diaphragm Ring combined with a BR-2A Lens Reversing Ring, plus a Nikon AR-10 cable release for setting the aperture. This was the setup: A Nikon lens (lacking an aperture ring) connected directly to the BR-6 F-mount socket. The 52mm threaded rear of the BR-6 connected to the BR-2A 52mm threads. The other side ...


4

No. Extension tubes that offer AF capability simply mean they have contacts that allow for electronic communication between the body and the lens. They do not have autofocus motors in them or add autofocus capability to a body/lens combination that doesn't have it without the extension tubes.


4

Can I combine this with a macro extension tube to adjust the focal length? Yes, you can. You can make some extension tubes with cardboard too to make some preliminary tests. P.D. Just make sure you are buying the correct extension tubes. I am assuming you have a Nikon camera, as the link you provided is for Nikon.


4

Yes, you can. But keep in mind that the optimal performance of a given pinhole is related to focal length used. More on the theme can be found here: How to calculate the optimal pinhole size?. Using a macro tube extender will give you suboptimal results - the longer focal length of the "camera" would ask for a bigger pinhole than your bodycap. On second ...


4

You don't really say, but it seems you have an EF lens and an EOS M camera? They have different diameters, so does it make any difference if I put it between lens and adapter or between adapter and camera? You can do either. You can use EF-M extension tubes with the smaller diameter mount between the camera and the adapter. You can use EF extension ...


3

Yes, macro photography can be done by using and combining multiple cheap methods (diopter rings, extension tubes and reverse mounting lenses) and here is an amazing example of what Alexey Kljatov achieved by reverse mounting old lens to a prosumer camera. Link: http://chaoticmind75.blogspot.hr/2013/08/my-technique-for-snowflakes-shooting.html Edit: Adding ...


3

Yes, they will both increase the macro effect of the lens when used together. However, it's not certain that all combinations of lenses, tubes and closeup lenses work together. An extension tube is constructed to be used with a lens without a closeup lens, and a closeup lens is constructed to be used with a lens without an extension tube. Each adds a bit of ...


3

First, there is no such thing as a macro "filter". You probably mean a closeup lens. It may look like a filter at a distance because it mounts on the front of the lens like a filter does, but it is actually a single-element lens. Basically, it's reading glasses for your camera. Second, there is no way to answer your question because "efficiency" makes no ...


3

This will work for a pinhole camera, within limitations, but zone plates actually have a certain focal length, so it won't there. (Of course, zone plates tend to have a very large depth of field, and aren't particularly sharp anyway, so in the real world you may have some latitude.) For a pinhole camera, there is an ideal pinhole size (for every wavelength ...


3

I have both wide angles and extension tubes in my bag. I have tried several times to use them altogether. With some of them, you can’t focus even with the thinnest extension tube. Indeed, the shortest focus distance is already extremely close to the front lens for most of the very wide angles. E.g. for my 16 mm, 20 mm and for my fish-eye: at the shortest ...


3

Cambridge in colour has an online magnification ratio calculator. And to quote the web site: An extension tube increases lens magnification by an amount equal to the extension distance divided by the lens focal length. Which, translates into: M_ExtendedLens = M_Lens + ExtensionLength / FocalLength Comment on jrista's answer I'm shy of having enough ...


3

Some cameras will allow close-up photography without the need to purchase any paraphernalia. Most modern cameras work in close by allowing you to select a “macro” mode. This is a menu item or button designated with the symbol of a flower. You need to check your camera manual, likely you don’t need any accessory to get you started. Next, look at your ...


3

It would let you focus closer. If this is the aspect of 'performance' that you need, give it a try. It will not IMPROVE image quality. It may not noticably increase distortion. Extension tubes are cheap. Try!


3

Indeed I didn't see but one is C and the other is CS so that's why the extension tube of 5mm was working. One of your cameras is C-mount with 17.526mm registration distance, the other is CS-mount at 12.526mm. There is a 5mm difference in the registration distance of those two mounts. You need a 5mm extension tube to use your C-mount lens having a ...


3

You can still focus using the lens manual focus or even the autofocus but the ring drastically reduces the range of possible focus distances, so the subject-camera distance must already be in that range. In addition the effect of the ring increases with the ratio of ring size to focal length. If you have a short focal length and a big ring the proper focus ...


2

Glare can be a real problem even if the inner surface is black, but not matt. For really bad tubes like those branded COMIX, some glare is present almost always. If a strong light source is outside the image frame, but near its edge, image quality can suffer dramatically, and automatic exposure and white balance sensors also be "confused". Air is air, but ...


2

Even if macro extension tubes have no glass in them, with cheap ones reflections or play at the mounts can make a huge difference. I recently bought one set branded COMIX, sold by Commlite, from eBay. It is useless because of glare and play. Kenko seems a safe bet. I got so upset with the COMIX tubes that I wrote a review some days ago comparing three ...


2

As far as I'm aware, the AF-S NIKKOR 200mm f/2G ED VR II lens has a mechanical aperture control, not electronic. The lever that controls the aperture can be found on the lens' mount. You could manually set the aperture by stuffing something such as the plastic part of a cut in half cotton bud in the aperture lever slot to keep the aperture set to what you ...


2

Take a look at the thin lens formula (image taken from Wikipedia): S1 here is the distance between the subject and the lens, and S2 is the distance from the lens to the spot where the image of the subject is formed. f is the focal length of the lens. You can see that as distance S1 gets smaller, S2 has to get larger to compensate. That is, as you move the ...


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