16

From the man page: -s (-short) Short output format. Prints tag names instead of descriptions. Add up to 3 -s options for even shorter formats: -s - print tag names instead of descriptions -s -s - no extra spaces to column-align values -s -s -s - print values only so, exiftool -s -s -s -...


16

Using ExifTool, ShutterSpeed is not an actual tag within the file, it's a tag derived from several other values (See Extra Tags). That's why it's grouped under Composite Tags when you follow ExifTool FAQ 3. As you discovered, the actual tag you want to write to is EXIF:ExposureTime using ExifTool.


13

For whatever reason, the ColorSpace tag is not very useful in EXIF. The only standard values are 1 (sRGB) and 65535 ("uncalibrated"). All other values are reserved. Some cameras use them to mean Adobe RGB or something else, but this is non-standard. Apple is, in fact, using Something Else, and that's found elsewhere in the metadata. With ExifTool, looking ...


10

% exiftool -Model='Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic' image.nef Further discussion on how to open unsupported files in Opening Unsupported RAW Files.


10

Assuming you're using Windows, part of the problem is that there is no "Date Taken" tag. Windows fills this property with different metadata, depending upon what it can find. The mostly likely tag (and the one Windows gives highest priority to) is the EXIF:DateTimeOriginal tag. So the best command for you to try would be: ExifTool "-FileModifyDate<EXIF:...


9

This is Lightroom-specific metadata, stored in the Lightroom catalog. You can verify that with this command¹ in the OS X Terminal: $ exiftool -b -xmp mypic.dng > orig.xmp Now go back to Lightroom, reject mypic.dng, and hit ⌘/Ctrl-S to force Lightroom to save its copy of the metadata to the photo file on disk.² Back in the Terminal, say: $ exiftool -b -...


8

Certainly if you have EXIF tags on your photos, either those written by your digital camera, or those you may have added manual to older photos, this is the way to go. "exiftool" is reliable and supports all of the various formats and tags. For instance, the following command, prints out the creation date of all image files found underneath the 2010 ...


8

Since there was a request for posting my comment as an answer, here it is, updated version. ExifTool -All= --ColorSpaceTags DIRorFILES exiftool -all= -TagsFromFile @ -ColorSpaceTags DIRorFILES This command will remove nearly all metadata but retain ExifIFD:ColorSpace, ExifIFD:Gamma, InteropIFD:InteropIndex, and ICC_Profile tags. ColorSpaceTags is an ...


7

If you are on Linux or willing to boot a Linux LiveDVD, you can use simple commands for that, something in the line of: find -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -a | grep "Image Width" find is used for searching for files, iname is used for case insensitive filename matching, print0 basically uses \0 character terminated filenames as outputs, so if ...


7

There's already a similar question on the ExifTool forums. It can be done using two sequential ExifTool commands. First, make sure all the date to the same exiftool -datetimeoriginal="2015:02:22 00:00:00" DIR And then increment the time on each exiftool '-datetimeoriginal+<0:0:${filesequence}0' DIR


7

No. PNG does not support EXIF. In fact, lack of a standardized metadata block is one of its big disadvantages for photography. If you need a lossless format which preserves (very-similar-to-EXIF, since it's the basis for EXIF) metadata, try TIFF. The downside, though, is that TIFF rendering support is not as widespread as that for PNG (for web applications ...


7

The problem is that the metadata that Windows uses as the "Date Taken" varies by file. For example, for a JPG, Windows will use Exif:DateTimeOriginal if it exists, followed by XMP:DateTimeOriginal, followed by CreateDate, followed by FileCreateDate (the system file create date). (Off topic, if anyone has a link that lists details of all the types of files ...


7

Try adding the -r option to the command, which tells exiftool to scan the directories recursively, starting from the top folder specified as an absolute path. Use the -ext option to specify the extension of files to operate on. Example: exiftool -csv -CreateDate -Keywords -r -ext jpg /absolute/path/to/top/folder > data.csv


7

As long as you have the filename set as you mention, the command you want to use is exiftool "-PNG:CreationTime<Filename" FileOrDir As @cmason mentions, PNG doesn't support the EXIF standard. Exiftool and Exiv2 do have a workaround, but it isn't widely supported. So EXIF tags won't be set by other programs unless you set them yourself with Exiftool or ...


7

There are a couple issues to note: DateTaken is a Windows properties, not a tag in a file. Windows fills the DateTaken value from a variety of tags. PNG files do not support EXIF metadata. There is a non-standard way of inserting EXIF metadata but it isn't supported by Windows. You could copy DateCreated to XMP:DateCreated, but Windows doesn't read XMP ...


6

Well, if you have good scripting skills, EXIFTool can be made to do this across folders. However, there is a donation-ware plug-in for Lightroom called LensTagger that may do the trick for you.


6

Using Exiftool in this manner will not change any of the metadata inside the file. Depending upon the filesystem, some of the filesystem based items (System:All tags in Exiftool) may change, such as FileCreationDateTime but these would change anyway no matter how you moved them.


6

You are correct about the [File] tags, they are info about the file from the underlying filesystem. Create Date/Time is the timestamp for when the file was created. I believe that File Modification Date/Time is changed whenever the the file is opened for a write operation, even when the write is 0 bytes. One of its main uses is to let backup software know ...


6

ExifTool has no built in ability to access online files. However, as shown in the example under Piping Examples, you can pipe the file from a program — such as cURL — to get the metadata of a file.


6

You do not ever want to change the make and model of a raw file such as a .RAF (or .NEF/.CR2/3). Without this data, Lightroom (and other raw file processors) are unable to determine the proper way of rendering the image. This is covered in exiftool FAQ #8. The Make and Model tags are used by some image utilities (including ExifTool) to determine the ...


5

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


5

It is the date and time the ICC Profile used by that image was first created. For example, my scanner inserts the same profile date for each image from 2006, even though I didn't have the scanner until 2010. If you don't see any other date in the metadata, then it just isn't there. If it was a screenshot off of a phone and not the original image, for ...


5

Exiftool reads many raw formats. You can use a command similar to this one to rename your photo files : exiftool '-filename<CreateDate' -d %y%m%d_%H%M%S%%-c.%%le -r -ext cr2 /path/to/pictures Change cr2 to whatever your raw extension is, and /path/to/pictures to the desired folder. Once renamed, you can sort them by name. There are more examples ...


5

You aren't using the variable with the user-provided input correctly. This answer assumes you're trying to run this script using a bash (or compatible) shell. If not, you'll need to refer to how to handle variables within your shell. You need to reference the shell variable using the syntax of the shell, not the exiftool argument, and remove the single ("...


5

Exiftool could do this with the -api "Filter=" option, but the command line could get long and messy. Using your example, the command would be something like this: exiftool -api "Filter=s/ü/ue/g" -TagsFromFile @ -all:all DIR The only trouble would be that the individual substitutions would get long and you would have to deal upper and lower case ...


5

In the linked tables, FOV refers to horizontal field of view, according to the key. The discrepancy would be due to the fact that the values calculated by exiftool refer to diagonal angle of view. As pointed out in comments, "field of view" would technically be defined as a distance across a plane at a given distance from the sensor. In practice, "field of ...


5

No, there is no way. This just isn't possible. There's no unalterable data that you can check. Why are people sending you false information? I'd work on checking your incentives, and make it easy to identify patterns of false reports.


5

There are a number of metadata standards used in photography. EXIF is one of them, but there are others in common use as well. Today's image files often include multiple metadata sections in different formats. EXIF is most concerned with metadata from the camera about the shooting situation: exposure parameters, image data structure, and etc. It has a few ...


4

First, use Lightroom's Save Metadata to File command (in the Metadata menu or via Ctrl/Cmd+S shortcut) to make sure the metadata saved in the JPG or XMP files (including keywords) are in sync with Lightroom's database. Then add the desired EXIF data to the image files (for JPG files) or XMP sidecar files (for raw image files) using exiftool. For instance, ...


4

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


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