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4

At my 30th year high school reunion we had a photo booth. That is, an actual booth that people sat in and had four quick photos taken by an automated camera system connected to a laptop that displayed the four images after they were taken. There was even a white diffusion panel with a light behind it above the camera. There was a box of props nearby with ...


3

Thank you for your suggestions and opinions, everyone! I called a few photographers in my area and decided to charge $200 for three hours at this small outdoor event, including edits and a DVD. I chose this amount because it's about a hundred dollars cheaper than the professionals, which takes into account: I'm new, don't have an assistant, and the client is ...


3

You're probably getting hungry quickly again because you're eating simple carbs — sugars and white grains. When I'm out shooting for a long time and know I won't get a break, I usually shove a few protein bars in with my camera gear. Look for ones that are relatively low in sugar — a good general tip is to avoid anything that says "energy!" as that's usually ...


2

Most image portfolio services (eg Adobe Portfolio, many others) do support an arbitrary number of galleries, each with their own URL and protected with their own password. While slightly inconvenient, setting up one small gallery per client would work. Also, consider simply buying USB sticks or SD cards in cheap bulk, giving everyone their files on their ...


2

I would suggest that you do not charge anything at all to the potential client because the instant you take money for a shoot, the relationship between you and your friend changes. They become your client proper and their expectation is that you will deliver everything they request. The pressure on you is to deliver and that may cause you to make an error. ...


2

your gear seems more than sufficient. With the flashes you can create nice motion blur using a wide angle lens. The tamron 11-24, you can use this lens at around 20 mm (which should be wide enough) considering space constraint (a typical scene) in a crowded night club. The 85 1.2L would be great in low light if you wish to take low key pictures in the low ...


2

I like your idea of having cards with unique QR codes on. What works for you depends very much on what you want to achieve. The commercial event software may well be best if you want to use this to make money. I have a system that works well enough for me without too much work. My "day job" is as an electrical design engineer, but I photograph various ...


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It depends on both the environment and what you want to show. If you will be in the crowd, being jostled and people moving around and in front of you, then you would want small and light. Quick focusing would be beneficial before someone bumps you, etc. A fast lens (f stop) would be beneficial for the same reason. As for the what you want to show, it ...


1

You're lucky to have such an arsenal available! In my opinion I would opt for the 16-35, especially if you can only shoot the 11-24 from 16mm due to vignetting, it gives you a bit more reach for individuals, plus should be plenty wide for groups. 50 and 85 are lovely lenses but one thing to be mindful is how far you can get back from the subject, speaking ...


1

What lens you chose really depends on two things; what composition you desire and the space you have to shoot in. I can't tell you the answer to either. Since you have a bit of time to adjust your shot before the guests arrive I think that the best answer is to simply take advantage of that. Bring a friend along who can stand in position and try out your ...


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I haven't done this. But I photographed at events with people printing photos. With memory cards being passed around,... quite the nightmare you are trying to avoid. I sure imagined how this could be sooo much better. Here are my thoughts: and 2.: wifi 1.) Set up your own hotspot or use an existing network. I'd prefer the own network. It solves the problem ...


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The key to this is that you need to be able to offer the organisers something they want. Simply asking to have a ringside seat to take photos isn't going to cut it considering any old Tom Dick and Harry could just do the same. What will they get out of it? Well considering they will have other professional photographers already there who have the equipment ...


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just approach them and ask if you can take some shots for your portfolio. Tell them in return you'll give them copies of all the shots for their own use. Where you may run into trouble is being right outside the ring can be a dangerous place. you really need an insiders understanding of what's going on to know how to stay out of the way if you're going ...


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