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30

"Expose to the right" means record the brightest image you can and then reduce the brightness in post to achieve the desired level. The word "right" comes from the histogram, where conventionally brightness increases left to right, thus increasing brightness shifts the whole histogram to the right. ETTR helps reduce noise simply by ...


8

To be short ETTR is a smart usage of two fact: There is more information in the high light (the right of the level curve) than in the low light (the left of the level curve). This is due to the fact that capter has linear response to the light intensity while human perception is rather log (what you perceive as twice brighter is in fact not twice the amount ...


6

I think you're under a misconception here. There's no evidence that the Android phone is doing anything but picking a middle exposure. The scene has a lot of dynamic range — it's a big difference between the shadows and the sky, but the camera is doing a great job keeping both (as you say, it looks like it activated the auto-HDR in camera). Lightroom is ...


5

ETTR is advocated so that you expose enough until you don't clip highlights That would be wrong without adding the word "important" or something similar, like in "don't clip important highlights". so that you can get less signal to noise ratio in the shadows Not less, but better (actually, higher; as noise is lower). ETTL is advocated because the ...


4

There are those who think ETTR is folklore, not fact. Ctein (who has multiple decades of experience and is a master printmaker) has written that ti's all bull. (link: http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/10/expose-to-the-right-is-a-bunch-of-bull.html) I'd suggest at least looking at his commentary. Me? I respect Ctein a lot,...


4

I think you're comparing oranges to apples. ETTR is setting up a shot to make the most of the sensor's data capacity, HDR or LUT is applied after the shot and can only amend whatever data is already there. You can use ETTR to potentially "squeeze" more data into your shot when shooting in RAW which theoretically produces a better shot. LUTs can be ...


3

Do smartphone cameras generally expose to the right? That's not something you can generalize because there are lots of smartphones out there with lots of different sensors in them that behave differently. Yours in particular appears to do that, probably because the manufacturer determined that doing so gets the best performance out of the sensor. In ...


3

The answers you cite contain the information you want. It may not be "accessible" enough without reading and re and re-re reading. I'll try to summarise what was said in those references and in many other places, but do note that this is a summary and lots of detail are available elsewhere. A digital camera sensor tends to produce an output that is linearly ...


3

It depends on the properties of the sensor in your camera. Raising the ISO setting means you amplify the signal before reading it out, this means your signal level is higher and thus read noise is lower relative to the signal, improving the overall signal to noise ratio. However Sony Exmor sensors (found in all NEX bodies, and many current Nikon/Pentax ...


3

This may entirely depend on what camera you use. Canon cameras are rather notorious these days for not having competitive dynamic range. They have decent dynamic range, but it is no longer competitive, and there are alternative options that allow you to preserve considerably more shadow detail without the need to either worry about using ETTR at all, or you ...


2

I also think that it depends on the camera. Factors include the bit-depth of the A/D, the various sources of noise, and unknown details. With all the theory requiring possibly unknown parameters even if the model is right, the only thing to do is a real test. Assuming the histgram fits completely in the exposure so you aren't deciding which end to cut ...


2

On modern DSLRs, the dynamic range increased, sometimes significantly. But there is a theoretical limit to "highlight recovery": If the (digital) value read from the sensor is all "1111" (e. g. the highest possible number), there is nothing that can be recovered, because all pixels which have the max. value are effectively "the same". A film on the other ...


1

It's a matter of giving attention to not discarding what can't be recovered; if you expose film for shadows, you're risking some "silky-smooth nonlinear saturation" being applied to the highlights. If you you expose digital for shadows, you're risking hard, off-the-edge-of-a-cliff clipping, which is a very decisive loss of information that you probably want ...


1

Cameras could do ETTR quicker and more accurately than humans No, because it is a judgement call what highlights need to be clipped. There is no agreement as to what is photographic dynamic range; and much here depends on the intended use and personal tolerance to noise and artifacts.


1

I thought it's worth adding this quote, from a whitepaper from Adobe, as it is an explanation from the company that makes the most popular software for processing photos and especially converting RAW data to images. You may be tempted to underexpose images to avoid blowing out the highlights, but if you do, you’re wasting a lot of the bits the camera ...


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