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28

The overall difference in typical image quality between a current smartphone like the Huawei P30 Pro and an older DSLR like the Canon EOS Rebel T1i/500D isn't the difference between the sensors. The difference is about who makes the decisions when shooting and, more importantly, in post processing about how both are done. Recent smartphones have gotten very ...


26

You could get a really fast 50mm f/1.4 [or cheaper 1.8] lens for $£€ 200 second-hand that will make those fabulous blurry background photos that smartphones can now fake quite well, in low light too. You couldn't, however, get a smartphone with that capability for much under $£€ 1,000. Additionally... ..if you got bored of the nifty fifty you could sell it ...


25

First: please recognize that despite what you may read on click-hungry review sites or fan-fueled forums, every DSLR and mid-to-higher range mirrorless camera on the market will be stellar for the purposes described. Any differences are details — every option is an A and it's then down to arguing over A+ or A++, as well as subjective factors or very ...


17

DXOmark and DXOmark Mobile scores are not directly comparable, you can only compare camera sensor scores to other cameras, and mobile sensor scores to other mobiles. Therefore your observation that the Huawei scores 112 and the 500D 63, so the Huawei sensor is almost twice as good isn't accurate. I can't find a site which directly compares all photographic ...


11

Who makes the bottom of the pecking order when it comes to durability? Canon and Nikon probably do. I can't imagine anyone making a DSLR or mirrorless more "disposable" than the newly introduced Canon 4000D (not even offered in the U.S.). It also has the lowest MSRP of just about any interchangeable lens camera on the planet with an APS-C size sensor. But ...


10

While I've never been to India, I've travelled in other countries of Southeast Asia. These are countries where you see vibrant colours everywhere. If it were I, I would shoot a reversal film because of the gorgeous results you get with such vibrant scenes. My preference is Fujifilm Provia, but many people rave about Velvia. If you can, try to shoot a test ...


10

I still have an old XS camera, which is older than yours. Only 10 Mpx, and with an old 50mm 1.8 lens, and I still use it for a quick portrait or as a backup camera. The point, in reality, is where do you want to expand your Photography skills. For me, the way to "upgrade" a camera is off-camera light. I would focus more on how to light a subject rather ...


9

In the spirit of "Teach a man to fish"... I almost don't know anything about lenses and cameras and photography, I just have D800E camera and I want to buy a lens that I can shoot photos of my family in travel. I'm genuinely curious how someone who doesn't know a thing about photography wound up with almost $2k sunk into their first camera. Photography ...


8

Hmm... To be honest, I'd have gone for something longer. For European wildlife, I use a Nikon 80-400 VR zoom lens, and mostly towards the long end. A wider aperture will give you a brighter viewfinder image - but I suspect you'll probably end up shooting at somewhere around f8 to get an adequate depth of field; That's what I usually end up doing if I want to ...


8

It doesn't matter much which filter you get. If you get the "wrong" one, you will have gained invaluable XP that will contribute to your continued advancement in photography. Options to consider: Don't get either filter. Since you will be using a tripod, you can use your current filter (or no filter) to take and blend multiple exposures. You can also play ...


8

TL;DR: Get the best 10-stop filter you are willing to afford. There are several to choose from, compared to shopping for a 9-stop filter. In no particular order, some considerations: This is very specific to the exact location you're shooting, but in my experience, the waterfall scene is darker than the Sunny 16 rule indicates. Usually, there's a bit of ...


7

There is no exact equivalent between film and digital cameras. Since the EOS 300 was an entry-level film camera, an entry-level digital DSLR may fit your needs. For Canon, those are the Rebel or three-digit (eg, 550D) series. However, your needs may be different. What about the EOS 300 do you want to be equivalent? Canon EOS DSLRs can use the same EF-mount ...


6

The advantages to learning exposure with digital are that it doesn't cost you any more to make more exposures (no film/development costs) and immediate feedback. You can instantly see the effect of setting change when you take the image (or if you're using a camera where you compose on the LCD or through an electronic viewfinder in liveview, before you take ...


6

Take the following with a baker's pinch (aka handful) of salt. The difference between F2.8 and F4 is only one stop. Whether that's worth an extra £1500 is a personal decision that only you can decide. Personally, I think the 70-2004G VR would be fine, and I'd go for another body or lens suitable for people, landscape, and other touristy pictures. For dawn/...


6

If you want something that lets you shoot a person in full while being relatively close and keep a shallow DOF, you need a rather open lens. You also need a short focal length (the shorter that length, the closer you can get and leave the other photographers behind you). My first guess would be a 17-50mm f/2.8 zoom (good and wallet-friendly models from Sigma ...


6

If you want a true ring flash, depending on your kind of macrophotography: Still objects, plenty of time: you can work in manual, do test short... about any flash will do. No need for much power at close range. Shooting outdoors, handheld, moving objects (bugs, etc...): something that is compatible with the camera TTL exposure will allow you to shoot using ...


6

Buying cheap AC adapters for parts and modifying them into a custom wire-harness that is run from a central power supply is my preferred solution for a problem like this. The most graceful solution for a setup like this is design a cable harness that includes the wiring for the power to each camera, as well as the trigger sync, and have them branch out in ...


6

Last Sunday I attended some event as a guest and the light was not at my disposal... I want to do just family and landscape photos in a slow pace and low light... Is there any chance... to upgrade my camera... ? I agree with Tetsujin. Consider a fast prime lens. I'd likely go for 24/2.8 or 35/2. Here are some options: EF-S 24/2.8 STM. Inexpensive and ...


6

I understand your concern. I personally have bought things on Amazon which looked completely legit but turned out to be fraudulent. (Like, not just generic instead of official, but actually with fake brand silkscreening.) However, this is generally because Amazon isn't really selling most of the stuff on amazon.com — it's a big network of third-party ...


6

Matt is correct. Pretty much everything on the market these days is very good and will outperform a D90 in almost all respects. He's also correct that raw files are intended to allow the photographer (or editor, if a different person) latitude in processing the raw data to create an image. This comes with the price of spending some time post processing, or ...


5

My two cents. The sandbags are to stabilize your gear, not to be a burden. In my opinion, use whatever you have on site, little rocks, bigger rocks if you are on location. Beach sand if you are on the beach. Tools and bolts if you are in a workshop. Yes, some materials can damage a bit of your bags. But I would not carry extra weight if traveling. To ...


5

Many of us grizzled old-timers like to boast about how we started with film in the era before autofocus existed and how it forced us to learn how to be real photographers.¹ But the reason we did so was because it was the only way to start back then. Now that you have a choice, though, starting with film is probably not the best way to get where you want to ...


5

Any interchangeable lens camera will do. Invest in: Lighting (for things that are physically textured, side vs head-on lighting makes a world of difference). You want to be as flexible as possible regarding color and position of lights. A macro lens. A secondhand, adapted, older, manual focus macro lens of 50 or 60 mm (made eg by Minolta, Nikon, Leitz, ...


5

Arguably, The EOS 300 (known as Rebel in some markets) was replaced by the 'Digital Rebel' some years ago, featuring similar feature set but with an 6.3MP APS-C (smaller than 35mm film) size sensor. Since that time, the 'Rebel' line continues but now features the T7 (or T5, T6) with an 24MP APS-C sensor. So, from a feature set perspective, the T7 is the most ...


5

3 full photos in only 4ms is well outside the realm of current mainstream DSLR camera specifications as of 2019. Your options will be limited to fairly advanced scientific grade gear, or using multiple cameras set up in a chain-firing method. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-speed_photography You will likely need to seek rotary mirror/prism setups if ...


5

The Pentax K1000 is the classic student camera and would be perfect. My first one was the similar Ricoh KR5, which was great. I have not used the Canon AE-1 or Nikon FM2, but based on the images I Googled, I can see that they have the standard manual exposure controls and will be fine as well. There are not different kinds of manual exposure mode. They ...


5

Any SLR film camera with shutter speed and aperture control would work. Some schools have equipment checkout. She may be able to use a school camera for the first several assignments or even the entire course. Consider purchasing from a local shop that tests and guarantees equipment. Shutter speed dial is on the camera. Aperture ring is usually on the lens. ...


5

Note: I answered the 'question within the question' rather than the stated title. For the title as it stands [stood, it's now been edited], see What is the difference between a telephoto lens and a zoom lens? At 10 miles across central London, you're not going to get detail, you're going to get lots of blue haze, even on a clear day. I can't see St Paul's ...


4

Exact same lens. Generally, the bundled price is lower than buying separately. Reasons to buy the camera body only include: You already have a lens collection and don't need that one. You're planning to buy different lenses (maybe higher quality, maybe just a different type, like primes instead of the big-range zoom)


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