11

Although it is hard to tell for certain from the included image, it looks like the only thing broken is a filter placed on the end of the lens. The first element of the EF 85mm f/1.8 lens itself is just past the ring of baffles below your broken filter. Remove the filter ring, clean off any remaining pieces of the filter being careful not to scratch your ...


7

It is impossible to say without trying the filter on the lens you intend to use it on and under the conditions you are going to use the combination. It is IMHO impossible just by a visual inspection of the scratch to determine wether or not it will or may have impact on the pictures you are going to take. If you can't try the filter before buying or are not ...


6

Thanks to everyone who responded. I hired a scuba diver and he found the camera (almost one week to the day in 20' of water). He rinsed the SD card for me before I picked it up. Put SD card I my laptop and it's like it never happened. My photos have been rescued. EDIT: I was asked to post a photo of the submerged/rescued card...


5

Besides looking for a sign that says "Caution, no photography, infrared lasers in use" are there any ways to check for the presence of infrared lasers before shooting? There are certainly ways to detect infrared lasers — if there weren't, they wouldn't be very useful for LIDAR or anything else. But I'm sure you're looking for a solution that's practical and ...


5

The job of the lens is to project an image of the outside world on the surface of the digital image sensor (or film). Our desire is a faithful image. To date, camera optics do a good job but residual aberrations (lens defects) are present for all lenses. The simple fact is, a lens aberration happens when the image-forming rays traverse the lens and some of ...


4

It takes a LOT of damage from scratches or fairly sizeable obstructions before they become noticeable! These photos from Roger Cicala's blog entry at lensrentals.com illustrate just how far a lens can be damaged or obstructed with very little impact on image quality. Although it is true that the coatings on the surfaces of lens elements that face other lens ...


3

Chances are one or both mirrors have been knocked out of alignment... best to get it serviced.


3

[Not enough for a full answer, too much for a comment.] I don't know whether that's a lot worse than expected, but it is expected on that type of superzoom; green-red chromatic aberration to the outside of the frame. It would probably help a bit if you could tell us what focal length you shot this at - the effect increases at longer lengths. I found a ...


3

Best practices for the future: Do not serve alcohol to cameras and lenses. They don't enjoy it as much as you do. They also tend to not tip bartenders – 50mL is 25% more than a shot. Let your camera sleep it off. It will be fine post hangover. Avoid using alcohol yourself when operating on cameras and lenses. Using other "recreational" substances is also ...


3

The most practical way might be to buy up old, low spec digital point and shoots and camera phones - the kind you can get for a few dollars apiece from thrift stores etc - in bulk, and use them up as expendable IR detectors before getting any valuable equipment out. Anything that can directly display what the sensor sees should work. IR is likely to be very ...


2

You said the scratch is very thin, and therefore covers minimal area of the filter. The big question, with respect to image quality, is if the scratch is through the ND material, or if the scratch is deep into the glass. If the scratch is strictly in just the ND coating (possible, perhaps unlikely), then you probably couldn't determine any flare or other ...


2

I suspect small clusters of sensels are dying off. This could happen if the sensor were damaged by lasers. Or perhaps the phone was dropped too many times and some internal connection was damaged. The following image from ILDA: Laser show damage to cameras shows laser damage that has essentially the same appearance as those in your sample image: The black ...


2

The only way to know the effect of particular marks on lens elements is to take test images with different settings and lighting conditions. For this particular lens, I would expect the marks: May be limited to the coating and have no discernible effect on image quality. May be visible when the lens is stopped down. Could cause glare or flare when used in ...


2

What could be the problem here? The last time you successfully used the flash may have depleted your batteries. Flash uses a lot of power compared to the rest of the camera. Either install fresh batteries or check the voltage of the old ones. After that the LCD will work again but shows an empty battery indicator, although I'm quite sure the batteries ...


2

Excessive heat poses a risk to almost any lens by reducing the viscosity of lubricants enough that they flow into areas where they don't belong. It is common in the used lens market to look for oily aperture blades as a sign that a lens is in trouble. (If this lube flow is the primary concern then it could very well be the case that you should be less ...


2

There are two risks to consider with lenses, and both apply to pretty much every lens made. Risks from focused sunlight Focusing sunlight readily creates a risk of heating materials to dangerous levels, which in turn creates the risk of fire. Allowing sunlight to pass through an open camera lens is a fire risk, with many Lens & Body combinations ...


1

Lenses with plastic mounts are usually not worth fixing. If the lens covers a focal-length range you use frequently, consider seeking a replacement with a metal mount. You'd have to replace the mount, but where would the replacement part come from? Likely another copy of the same model lens... which had also been dropped... which also has a broken mount... ...


1

If the problem is sporadic, then maybe it could be caused by dirty contacts. That said, statistically speaking, that error is nearly always caused by a torn aperture ribbon cable. A loose cable connection or a cold solder joint at either end of that ribbon cable could also potentially be the cause. Either way, the problem is that the electrical connection ...


1

You can't fix the screen, because it apparently isn't the screen that is broken, but rather something else that provides the signal to the screen.


1

This camera is not meant to be consumer-repairable. When you face a problem like this, send it into a Nikon repair center for repair.


1

Based on the images you've shown, it looks like you are comparing edge performance with center performance. It's expected that the edge and corners won't be as sharp as the center. The trees and ground on the far left and right of the frame appear about equal, as far as I can tell (there are significant JPEG artifacts, which is clearly seen as banding in the ...


1

It's a little hard to tell from your examples, but I think you are saying that there's a consistent difference in sharpness (and possibly chromatic aberration) on one side of the frame compared to the other. If that's the case, this is unlikely to be a damaged coating. This is usually a de-centered or slightly tilted lens element. Nothing is perfect, and ...


1

If a laser beam is strong enough to cause thermal damage (ie burn or melt the sensor, the filter in front of it, or even the shutter or aperture), it will be almost irrelevant if an image sensor (of whatever type) is powered on or not (it being powered on could worsen the thermal damage a bit by causing an already elevated temperature). Damage from an ...


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