35

Using an electronic viewfinder or LCD screen to compose the image uses more battery life than a standard viewfinder Using an LCD screen for the majority of device settings uses more battery life than physical, dedicated buttons Smaller physical devices may, by design, have smaller batteries


22

So, why can't the sensor's image data downloaded to the processor, globally? Why is it downloaded row by row? It's a matter of physical limitations and simplicity. The physical limitation is that there's only space for a certain number of external connections -- you couldn't possibly connect every pixel to the processor and grab all that data at once ...


21

The main reason is because the batteries for MILCs are almost universally smaller than DSLR batteries. Some mirrorless batteries: The LP-E17 battery for the Canon EOS M5 has a 1050 mAh (milliamp-hour) charge storage. The NP-FW50 for the Sony a7R II has 1020 mAh. DSLR batteries: Nikon's EN-EL15 battery (for D500, D600, D610, D7000, D7100, D750, D800, ...


14

A mirrorless camera consumes more power mostly because the circuitry is constantly running. Both the sensor and EVF or LCD have to be powered continuously in order to maintain the Live-View which is necessary for framing. In contrast, a DSLR can even be used to frame while powered off. The viewfinder requires no power at all and the status line below the ...


6

Because the sensor essentially never stops sensing. There is no mechanism built into the sensor to not bleed charge from the little capacitors when light hits it. It also takes long enough to read out all the data from the sensor, so that there would be significant exposure time variation between parts of the image if the firmware reset the sensor, waited ...


6

The review has pictures to confirm higher noise of electronic shutter at similar settings, so it's not just a matter of prejudice. On some recent models, e.g. GH4 and GM1, Panasonic has been caught using reduced bit depth (10 bits instead of 12) with electronic shutter to speed it up. As a half-price alternative to GH4, I'd expect G7 to pull the same trick, ...


4

Way back in 2014 Canon introduced a feature with the 7D Mark II that they called flicker reduction. Basically, the camera uses the light meter to detect the timing of flickering lights and then times the shutter release so that the middle of the exposure coincides with the peak of flickering lights. Remember, with focal plane shutters the time difference ...


4

Firstly, does a mechanical shutter in a digital camera work the same way as in a film-based camera? Yes, it's exactly the same. If I use a slow shutter speed, am I actually exposing the sensor for a prolonged period of time or is this more like capturing a video and then layering the frames on top of each other? The former. Shutter speed determines the ...


4

Cameras that have both electronic and mechanical shutters tend to leave the mechanical shutter closed when the camera is turned off. This means that in order to use the electronic shutter the mechanical shutter must be opened at least once each session. At the end of the session the mechanical shutter is closed and that will finish one complete cycle of the ...


3

Electronic front curtain is different from an electronic shutter. An electronic front curtain simply de-energizes the entire sensor and then it turns on to start the image recording. The image recording is then ended with the normal rear curtain. This is different from an electronic shutter where the image recording is started/ended by a rolling readout (...


3

There are CMOS-based cameras with electronic shutters (basically all cameras with video mode have electronic shutters) but the technology does have its limits. When the camera reads from a CMOS sensor it reads the data line-by-line, not all at once, this means that, if the subject or the camera moves fast enough you can get very interesting effects. CCD ...


3

The Nikon D40/D50/D70 have electronic shutters. They are old and not high megapixel, but they're cheap! D70 is like $100 on eBay.


3

This is a limitation of the electronic shutter used in your camera. Actually, it is a limitation of nearly all electronic shutters, some brands cap it at just 1/60s, some more, such as Panasonic with a 1s cap. It probably depends on the generation and these things are relatively new and bound to improve in future digital cameras. A mechanical shutter is a ...


2

No an electronic shutter doesn't have a limited life as far as shutters go. It does have a life span as far as any electronics goes. A dSLR can have either a 100% electronic or a mixed mechanical and electronic shutter. Indeed Sony Alpha have both pure electronic (called silent shutter) and a mix called electronic first curtain shutter. Naturally the ...


2

The reason is economical. CMOS sensors with global shutter are available, but the added complexity makes them very expensive, and this extra cost would be justified for very, very few photographers. Let's take Sony video camera models PMW-F5 vs. PMW-F55. Global shutter is the main difference between them. The price difference is quite steep, $16k vs $29k - ...


2

The electronic shutter speed is limited by the rate at which the camera reads the image data from the sensor. For most CMOS sensors, and therefore most regular DSLRs, the camera reads image data from it progressively, rather than reading all the image data instantaneously. As it reads, it resets the data held by those pixels. If this process takes, for ...


2

The reason for the phenomenon is that at wide apertures in good light necessitating a fast shutter speed, most of the exposure is coming from a very narrow traveling slit between the first and second curtain. The curtains before and after the slit are not at the same height, however. The electronic curtain travels where the photosites are. The mechanical ...


2

No, it's the opposite, the edges of the mechanical shutter diffract light, while the electronic shutter is not affected because it does not exist; there is no physical element that might cause the diffraction. The answer by chulster here shows that the effect is only noticeable in very high contrast situations, like bright light sources (similarly to the ...


2

Yes, there is a very valid reason. Mirrorless cameras typically have an electronic first shutter curtain and a choice between electronic and mechanical shutter for the second curtain. First, you should understand how a traditional mechanical shutter works. In the beginning, the sensor is covered by the first curtain. The first curtain starts to move down, ...


1

I think if you read the manual you will find that the electronic first curtain/mechanical second curtain function is only available at SS's below shutter curtain transit time/flash sync (~ ≤ 1/250). And at higher SS's it is functioning as a completely electronic shutter... which is rolling readout, not global. The rolling readout electronic shutter works by ...


1

The problem is, that the camera does not do a full sensor readout in one go (or global shutter), but reads the sensor linewise. LED light is often pulsing to dim the light. So when you see a LED that is half bright, it often is instead flickering faster than your eye can detect and is instead off for half of the time. If you combine both, you get something ...


1

I don't think that is a good question for photo@SE, because this is about a video surveillance camera with ethernet interface. I do speak Russian, so might provide some info. From the camera's manual: Translated: DIP switch camera modes: “AES” (Auto Electric Shutter) – when using lens with manual control of the aperture “DC IRIS” – when using ...


1

This is a bit of an apples to oranges scenario but I will try to answer the spirit of the question. Auto Electric Shutter (AES) is the mode where a desired Iris value is set and the resulting shutter speed is chosen by the camera. This tends to have drawbacks in the versatility of the camera but has the advantage of allowing a camera to be manufactured with ...


1

I've now found the answer in the manual... silent mode          = electronic shutter (no choice here!) electronic shutter = 1 second longest exposure


1

Off-topic regarding the shutter. My main concern would not be the shutter, but: 1) That you have a good mechanical lens, that do not go crazy changing zoom and auto focusing. Probably a fixed focal prime lens, lets say 85mm. 2) Discard those cameras that hide the lens each time you turn them off. 3) Aim for a 10 Mpx camera so your images are ready for a ...


1

I don't really know what you're asking about. If you want to capture sharp and clear images of moving paper, its speed isn't really relevant. What's important is rather the angular velocity of the details you want to capture. If the paper is far away it would be no problem to take a picture. A more detailed shot of the paper could end up blurry (the angular ...


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