Hot answers tagged

11

Colour-dodge will do it. You didn't say what software you have access to, though I assume most editing software will have a Dodge/Burn feature. In Photoshop I set it to dodge shadows with about 40% strength. This was a very quick attempt, you could do better, taking more care, on the original full-sized image...


11

As already noted, this question is at least borderline "opinion-based"... But for my 2¢ I think the watermark is a) too prominent & b) in the wrong corner. It looks more like an artist's signature than a copy-protection device. This was just a quick 2 min tweak. I dropped it to 25% opacity & moved it bottom right. I think if you're going to have a '...


7

Banding the sides of an image is called pillarboxing (as opposed to banding the top and bottom, i.e., letterboxing). Wikipedia's page refers to the technique you describe as "stylized pillarboxing" or "echo pillarboxing".


7

OK, so I didn't have a box of fascinating delicacies to try this out on - I just had a box of eggs & some blueberries in the fridge, which I sat by the window-sill in direct but quite muted sunlight. if you can't read it, it's because I flipped it left to right to better match the OP It's by no means the perfect photo, just a quick example. Basically ...


4

There certainly seems to be a disconnect between the style of the photos and the style of the signature in the watermark. It's like looking at an edifice built in the Greco-Roman temple style with the expectation that there will be words chiseled in bold upper-case Latin above the entrance, yet looking up and seeing an inscription in Comic San Serif. Or ...


4

Comments turned into an answer... As has already been covered, you cannot blur the RAW, because edits to RAW are saved as 'sidecar' files & are entirely optional for any other person, app or computer viewing them to use or ignore as they see fit. There's another downside to RAW - only you know what your intent was; anyone else opening it in disparate ...


4

Is this a RAW image by any chance ? If so I'd probably first approach this by generating -2 stop and +2 stop images (as virtual copies) and do an HDR composite. You'll need to be heavy on the NR and color noise reduction, and use sharpening only with the built in filtering (threshold). Beware of overly compressing the image as it is already low contrast. ...


3

That looks to me more like noise, particularly chrominance noise, than posterization or banding. But the two things can look very similar at times, particularly if too much compression was used when converting to JPEG.¹ There are some noticeable compression artifacts near the edges between the red sleeve and the background. When one underexposes a shot and ...


3

Your command would be exiftool -if "$Make=~/^OLYMPUS /" -Make=OLYMPUS DIR This command takes the Make tag and performs a check to see if it matches the RegEx expression ^OLYMPUS (including the space at the end). If the make tag does match, then it will rewrite the tag to just be OLYMPUS. Replace DIR with the directory paths and/or files you wish to ...


3

There are several ways one could get results similar to the one in your example image. Among them: Use multiple exposures shot at slightly different angles and subject distances (or focal lengths). Use special effects lenses in front of the main camera lens, such as a "prismatic lens". Use a single exposure and post process it using different layers with ...


3

When you "edit" a raw image with pretty much all available raw processing applications, you're not really editing the raw data. You're editing the set of instructions on how that data should be used to produce a viewable image. The actual raw data is not altered. When you look at a 'raw' image on a screen, you're not really looking at "THE raw image", ...


3

The halos are caused by increasing local contrast globally (over the entire image at once) when the image has fairly dark and fairly bright areas that are next to one another. There's no extremely easy way to deal with it. The most common way is to use layers and create separate masks for the dark and light areas and apply the localized contrast (that's ...


2

You could try the (free) PyExifToolGUI which is a actually a frontend for the command line tool ExifTool. I don't know if the Windows installer needs you to install ExitTool (and several Python packages) separately. The linked page has details of the manual and installation. I have it on my system and you can select one or multiple files and set ...


2

Assuming your Windows or Mac computer is compatible with the Wacom Intuos Pro, it can be used as an input device with Adobe Photoshop. As with any input device, it will work best if the latest drivers for it are installed on your computing device. It's included in this article at 'Tablet Under Budget': The Best Tablets for Photoshop – Our Top Picks for ...


2

By the way dodge and burn technique was invented in the film’s darkrooms when you where enlarging negatives to positive copies. Working with negatives the more time the light from the enlarger hits the “shade of” white photosensitive paper the darker it will get after finishing to develop it. So to dodge consists of putting something (a black mask) between ...


2

Catalogs and the Backups Folder The main concept you need to understand here is what a Lightroom catalog is. It's not all your image files in one big file. The Lightroom catalog is simply a database that Lightroom uses to tie together all the information about your images. Where the original image file lives, the edit history of each image, tagging, ...


2

If you mean the very narrow plane of focus, it is possibly obtained with a tilt-shift lens where, instead of using the tilt that makes the focus plane cover the subject, they used the tilt that make the focus plane have a small intersection with the subject. It's also possibly just a very wide aperture for a shallow depth of field.


1

For a completely different stance (but a similar final answer): In theory, you could write software to black/white out areas in a RAW file, and leave the rest of the picture unchanged. In practice that would be useless, because people are what we look at (when they aren't the main subject). And we notice the slightest changes(*). So you can't edit a ...


1

I understand your concern. I must say that you don't need to worry about this, because nothing changed here. Now read this carefully and reply if you have any questions. Your time with lightroom can be classified into two: 1. Previously, before you accidentally removed your catalogue, you had some photographs, and all were added to your lightroom panel. Now ...


1

An OOOOLD trick: use a womens nylon stocking and clamp it over the lens.


1

I meant by "ethical background and standard of editing images" is edited by someone else to alter the image beyond the intent of the owner of a photograph. When an image is created the photographer is almost always considered the owner of the image. The exceptions would be if the photographer created the image for another entity (individual or corporation) ...


1

After some more googling and looking around I found jhead http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/jhead/ Windows users: download the "Pre-built Windows executable" jhead.exe and place it into the folder with your photos. This is how you change the date taken on all photos in the folder by a defined time span (as documented on the website) (my photos were ACTUALLY ...


1

This is both very common and difficult to break into. The practice of a pro photographer concentrating on the important things - shooting pictures and building client relationships - and outsourcing the rest is as old as professional photography. Ages before Lightroom arrived there were lab assistants doing darkroom stuff and retouchers working with ...


1

It's pretty common to outsource editing, especially in fashion photography where the high-end edits are a full-time job, not only because of the skills, but mostly because of the time it takes to do the skin job and the special effects (up to 6 hours/picture). So it couldn't possibly be done by the same person, they have to make photographers and retouchers ...


1

Many full-time professional photographers employ assistants of various kinds. An assistant could be: handling and setting up lighting gear before or during the photoshoot holding light disc or other reflector metering exposure loading film into film camera or film back retouching, color correcting or post-processing photos managing digital files or film ...


1

Without masking the shot & treating both halves differently, the best I can come up with quickly is the following:- Original for comparison [jpg of RAW preview] To add punch & try clean up what is a pretty noisy image.. [All settings are at 'overkill' to clearly show the principle without having to look at the full size images.] Lift exposure ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible