5

17 stops sounds...wishful. A film's characteristic curve is, for the most part, set. One can change the slope (contrast) by adjusting development or purposefully expose to the left or right of the curve and then bring it back in development (push/pull)...but there really isn't a way to extend the curve to where base+fog moves further left or blocked ...


5

What you seem to be after is a metering mode that places the highest priority on not blowing the highlights. This is important for many photographers and many lighting situations. But there are also other times when getting the shadows or the midtones properly exposed is more important to the photographer. At those points where the dynamic range of the scene ...


3

You're using a much wider aperture on the second photograph : the buildings in the background - and even the window frame - would be out of focus irrespective of any highlights. Cameras are great at exposing for something in focus, but even with spot metering an out of focus background might affect the picture. In this case, the camera has exposed more (...


3

The setting you're likely looking for is Highlight Tone Priority (HTP). This makes the camera expose for highlights, to avoid blowing them out, and brings back shadows to normal with processing. Other cameras may refer to this as Dynamic Range Expansion/Optimization. Other settings you might find helpful: Auto Lighting Optimizer (ALO). Cannot be used with ...


2

The end result of High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) is not to produce an image with dynamic range as high as the scene it attempts to reproduce. We do not have display technology available that can do that. At least not practical ones. The aim of HDRI is to take a very high dynamic range scene and reproduce it in a way that we can see the very bright and ...


2

First, regardless of the particular dynamic range definition, calculating "anything vs zero" luminance is not useful, because then the ratio becomes infinite. Your: log2(max)-log2(0) is another way of saying: log(max/0) and we can't divide by zero (and log2(0) is undefined) So let's forget the 0 for now (zero means the image is not well exposed anyway ...


1

In short: No. Not unless you're in a controlled laboratory-like setting and you have robot-like repeatability. (If nothing else, the photographic process can be quite consistent.) A photographic print is a representation of the luminance range of the scene using a density range. I'll avoid "dynamic" for the present. It is the result of processes which are ...


1

No, this does not make sense in many cases. I'll provide an answer based on digital, not based on print, as opposed to the other answer. Consider this: you have a scene where the maximum brightness is 1 000 000 times the minimum brightness. No digital camera with commonly used technology can express that much dynamic range. If the whites are properly ...


1

"Auto" mode is designed to prevent an inexperienced user from making bad decisions. In order to do this, the camera makes as many decisions as it can on its own, based on how it is programmed to respond to different shooting conditions. If you want to control things such as Picture Profiles or DRO without going to full manual control, you need to get out of ...


1

Mind that typical camera sensors work in a cumulative/integrating way - think of either a tiny capacitor either being charged by a voltage source with a tiny photocell (photodiode, phototransistor, CDS cell, whatever!) in series, or a pre-charged capacitor shorted by a photocell. IIRC the second way is actually what is happening in typical sensors. This ...


1

It's been decades since I've developed film, however for B&W film using a two step developer like "Diafine" can extend the apparent dynamic range considerably. Standard one step developers have activators as part of the mix. How much the film is developed is a function of time and temperature. Two step developers like "Diafine" have the activators as ...


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