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32

The dust isn't on the lens — it's on the sensor. Dust on the lens will not resolve so clearly. To check for it quickly, set your aperture to the smallest your lens can support. (Small apertures have large f-numbers, like f/22.) This will keep the light striking the sensor to a straighter angle, which in turn will make the dust (which sits on filter layer ...


8

I ran a few more tests. Here are the results: No change to sensor: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks (similar to the top speck in the sample pictures) f/10, 2.0", ISO 200 White specks (similar to the bottom speck in the sample pictures) Manual sensor cleaning: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks in the exact same location, but smaller f/10, 1.8", ISO ...


5

The air is full of dust. It's floating around everywhere all the time. When you open the lens in a dusty environment (which is to say "every environment that isn't a clean room"), dust gets into the light-box of the camera. You didn't ask, but this is why seems silly to advise people to point their cameras down while changing lenses. Observe how dust moves ...


5

I agree with mattdm, dust in images are usually found on or near the sensor. They are usually visible at small apertures, like F16-32. Some thoughts and points to consider on this topic: You can avoid problem apertures with aperture priority. Dust usually isn't visible in photos taken with apertures larger than about F8. Check for dust proportional to how ...


4

Perhaps. Your supplied example doesn't show obvious dust. You can get a 'clearer' view by stopping down to f22 and taking an out-of-focus shot of a featureless wall or clear sky. Shutter speed doesn't matter. Any debris on the sensor will show up nicely. Note that debris on the rear lens surface -may- also show up, albeit softer...


4

Dust removal using a dust mask can be done with G'MIC with the "Inpaint [Multi-Scale]" filter. The easiest way to use G'MIC is as a plugin for GIMP, Krita, or Paint.NET. However, it is available as a command-line utility. Convert the dust image into a bitmap with pure red and white (or transparent) pixels. (G'MIC uses pure Red as the default mask color.) ...


3

Here’s what I did in the end: First of all, opening up the lens is not a good idea. It’s a complex and delicate system, and if you don’t have experience in this area, avoid disassembling the lens. To clear up the dust from within the focus ring you need to blow air from under it. In this model, this was not possible from outside. So I got a power duster ...


3

If the soft white dots have tiny little tendrils coming from them it's probably, fungus or pollen. Here's my suspicions...


2

To me it seems dust on the sensor. Have you tried using the cleaning routine as described in the manual (pp.180)?


2

I suspect small clusters of sensels are dying off. This could happen if the sensor were damaged by lasers. Or perhaps the phone was dropped too many times and some internal connection was damaged. The following image from ILDA: Laser show damage to cameras shows laser damage that has essentially the same appearance as those in your sample image: The black ...


2

No, there is nothing you can do yourself. This is one of those cases of, "if you have to ask, then you don't know enough about it to do it yourself". The lens needs to be sent to Sigma (or a Sigma authorized repair center) for cleaning and repair. Lens motors and mechanics are not designed to be user-serviceable. Damage or malfunction due to fine-dust ...


2

It's easy to see what comes with the Mount Adapter EF-EOS R at Canon USA's product listing. Just scroll down and click on the "What's included" tab to see the following list: The listings for the Control Ring Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, Drop-in Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R with Drop-in Circular Polarizing Filter A, and Drop-in Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R ...


1

Assuming your sample images are of the camera's entire frame, then your spots are a bit larger and softer than typical dust on the front of the sensor stack would look at f/22. Check the rear element of your lens for dust or maybe even water condensation spots. If you don't find anything there, keep moving forward. The further forward you go in the lens, the ...


1

Those are defective pixels, specifically "hot pixels", in your image sensor. It's rare for a sensor not to have one or two, unless you pay the big bucks for one that's been carefully inspected. You usually don't see hot pixels in finished published works. Usually software at some level detects these and replaces those pixels with an average of the ...


1

Sensor size, pixel density, and dust particle size don't matter much if you expose the sensor to dusty environments. Is dust less of an issue with larger sensors? Take two differently sized sensors with the same pixel density. The larger sensor, by virtue of its larger surface area, is more likely to capture dust. In an extreme case, suppose a single ...


1

Personally, I've had to clean FF sensors on my 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III a number of times over the years I've used them. I've never had to clean the sensors on my 7D or 7D Mark II. The two aforementioned FF cameras have an aggregate of 147,000 shutter actuations. The two aforementioned APS-C cameras have an aggregate of 153,446 shutter actuations. The ...


1

The answer is: caps do not need to be purchased separately, because the adapter comes with a cap attached to both ends in the sales package. Retailer pictures for some reason often don't show the caps (probably to show the internal parts of the adapter, or to avoid showing the true size of the adapter with caps attached). Do remember that if using the EF - ...


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