Hot answers tagged

21

C is the correct answer. Well, actually it's A if you look at the sensor from the back, but my guess is that you will turn the camera around and access the sensor from the front. So it's C.


18

Several models of zoom lens are designed in such a way that they likely inhale dust and may vent it into the body of the camera. How big a problem this is remains debatable (see this discussion for example). Also, most lenses are not externally dust sealed so air and fine particles are likely to make their way in over time. For these reasons it probably ...


13

Yes. I just got back from a trip shooting at the Wildlife Refuges. I didn't remove the lens, and in fact, hadn't removed the lens for about the last 3,000 images. The last 300 images have a very distinct dust spot that appeared somewhere during the last day's shoot. Fortunately, in a place where I can crop it out without impacting the images. Dust on a ...


11

Sigma DSLRs have this feature instead of dust-reduction which almost all others have. In the case of these Sigma DSLR, this also block IR light from reaching the sensor while other DSLRs have a filter right in front of it to do that. The suggestion of @rfusca is one I thought of before. It would probably not be complicated to have a protective cover in ...


10

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


10

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


8

Other than the obvious advice of avoiding switching lenses when you're in a an old barn or a flour mill or other particularly dusty environment, the main thing is be fast. And the way to do that is to practice. With modern automatic sensor cleaning, dust isn't the plague it was in the earlier days of digital SLRs. So, don't be afraid to just start changing ...


8

That's definitely fungus, and it's not going to go away. The first question to ask is it affecting your image quality. If it is not then control the problem, always keeping the lens in a dry environment. You could get it professionally cleaned, but honestly for that lens you could buy a replacement for a lot cheaper. You may also want to read about some ...


8

It's highly unlikely that this many pixels on the sensor would become "dead" in quick succession, or in this pattern (groups of pixels, rather than individual pixels). This is clearly dust directly on the sensor. I also see indicators of dust on the inside of the lens (larger, out-of-focus areas that are lighter than their surrounding pixels). For ...


8

Looks really bad. Normally, dust gets on top of the stack of optical filter which sits above the sensor. It then shows as small blurry disks which get smaller and darker at narrow apertures because they are close to the sensor but not directly on. From your example, I would guess that you have dust that entered below the filters and is directly on the ...


7

Image quality and possibly expense Introducing yet another element in front of the sensor will degrade quality of the pictures, and for various reasons. a) being outside of protection of the shutter will mean that it is constantly in contact with the air and dust. This will mean it will require more constant cleaning than a sensor would. How often do you ...


7

Yes completely normal and nothing to worry about. As you are aware all SLR / DSLR cameras have a prism / mirror / eyepiece, which can collect dust just as easily as any other part of your camera. I can only assume that you do not keep your D7100 in a particularly sanitary conditions - as my D70, D300 and D800 have never suffered with viewfinder dust to a ...


7

It is true. Any effects from small amounts of dust in the lens will be negligible. There will be a considerable amount of dust between the sensor and any given subject, all the time - what difference will a little more in the lens make? You will probably never find a used lens anywhere on Earth that does not have a some dust inside it, especially zoom ...


7

I ran a few more tests. Here are the results: No change to sensor: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks (similar to the top speck in the sample pictures) f/10, 2.0", ISO 200 White specks (similar to the bottom speck in the sample pictures) Manual sensor cleaning: f/2.8, 1/6", ISO 200 Blue specks in the exact same location, but smaller f/10, 1.8", ISO ...


6

That statement from the Russian site is misleading. Shooting in raw format doesn't have any relevance to spot removal. You can remove dust spots just as easily with any other format of image. There are multiple ways of clearing dust spots: Capture NX uses a healing brush Lightroom 4 (and below) use the spot removal healing brush Photoshop uses a spot ...


6

The problem with having a glass screen over the lens mount is that it would be useless as the if the rest of the interior cavity is not sealed from dust. The protective screen would then prevent you from cleaning out dust that got in from other sources. Camera bodies are not assembled in a clean room environment, so there is dust around the sensor from day ...


6

Assuming you're just talking about the front element - I use these disposable Zeiss wipes. They do better than a lens pen (which handles dust ok, but doesn't do smudges nearly as well) and a box of 200 will last a long, long time with hobby level use. My local Walmart sells the box of 200 for under 4 dollars in the camera and the optometrist section. They ...


6

Looks like dust to me. But, it'd be on the sensor, not the lens. You're shooting into the sun - and if you're using an auto-exposure mode, then your camera likely stopped down. Stopping down exacerbates seeing the dust in your photo. Want to really see how much dust there is in there? Stop down to f/16 or f/22, fill the frame with a bright light source, ...


5

First, any waterproof camera will do. Those are completely sealed against dust, moisture, water, snow, etc. The constraint on the lens they use means limited flexibility and certainly lower quality than standard cameras of a similar size. Among those, the best one I've seen so far is the Nikon Coolpix AW100 which I reviewed here. Do look at the sample ...


5

I've had that problem on my 400d. If the spots do not show up if you photograph a white wall with at F22, you have dust on either the focus screen or the viewfinder glass. First clean the glass and see if the spots are gone. Then check if your camera has a interchangeable focus screen. Then you can take it out to clean it. I believe yours does not, so you ...


5

You didn't link to any specific product but from what I can find by googling "650d silicone case" those products provide no water/dust protection whatsoever. The big opening in the camera that let dust/water in are, in order of importance: The lens mount The battery door Various connectors (USB etc.) Buttons and dials Any case that only covers some of the ...


5

I'm a bit worried about a potential scratch to my d7000 sensor as shown in the rather grainy image below. Scratching the sensor itself is unlikely to happen. The sensor itself is typically behind a (hard to see) element that acts (in part) to shield it. However, upon reducing the aperture the line becomes more blurry which is indicative of a dust spot ...


5

The air is full of dust. It's floating around everywhere all the time. When you open the lens in a dusty environment (which is to say "every environment that isn't a clean room"), dust gets into the light-box of the camera. You didn't ask, but this is why seems silly to advise people to point their cameras down while changing lenses. Observe how dust moves ...


4

As the comments to the original question indicate, it depends on exactly which camera you are talking about. Nikon lenses have a mechanical connection for aperture control that is spring loaded at both the camera end and inside the lens that could suffer damage if disconnected while in the wrong position. If the tab on the control lever in the camera is ...


4

Depending on the camera model, some have a "Dust Delete Data" function, whereby you take a photo of a blank white wall, and the software (I can't remember if its in the camera, or if you have to use external software like DPP) basically maps the 'blobs' as seen on the photo of the white wall over the top of your picture and makes the adjustments in those ...


4

Is dust on the sensor normal? Unfortunately, yes. One of the few disadvantages of digital vs. film is that the recording medium isn't changed every time we swap out a roll of film. Over time dust will find its way onto your sensor. There are several precautions you can take to minimize the impact of dust on your sensor. Change lenses as rarely as possible, ...


4

For two reasons: It would add to cost, complexity and chances of the camera failing. What happens when the mechanism fails and the curtain stays closed just before you shoot the crucial shot of a sports match (which you had to change lenses for)? It wouldn't work. As stated in my answer to the question you linked to, camera bodies aren't manufactured in a ...


4

No, this isn't a huge deal. Aside from the 1x00D series, other Canon camera models that did not have the sensor-shake/cleaning feature include: 1Ds, 1DsMkII, 1D, 1DMkII, 5D (classic), 10D, 20D, 30D, 300D (Rebel), and 350D (XT). I shot with the 350D (it was my first dSLR) for four years, I changed lenses like a mad thing, often forgetting (gasp! horror!) to ...


4

Dust removal using a dust mask can be done with G'MIC with the "Inpaint [Multi-Scale]" filter. The easiest way to use G'MIC is as a plugin for GIMP, Krita, or Paint.NET. However, it is available as a command-line utility. Convert the dust image into a bitmap with pure red and white (or transparent) pixels. (G'MIC uses pure Red as the default mask color.) ...


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