Hot answers tagged

44

There are three main methods by which a dSLR/mirrorless camera can be used as a webcam. HDMI capture HDMI capture requires two things: that the camera can output "clean HDMI"; that is HDMI that doesn't have camera control overlays all over it, and an HDMI capture device to turn the HDMI output from the camera into a USB webcam input to the computer....


29

There is no clear answer: That depends on your type of photography. If you want the camera just to take the usual this and that photos, you are probably not missing out very much. The computational support in the phone has come quite a way. However, you will notice some limitations: Due to the small sensor, the performance in low light is limited. The phone'...


19

Definitely don't try to support the camera by its hotshoe. It's not designed for it. I don't think you should put anything at all on a hotshoe. Everything is so heavy and all the weight is pushing and pulling in all directions on that little joint. Even if your hotshoe is designed to do that, that's an insanely bad holder. Your camera is hanging off the ...


16

You've got the right approach, but given that the electronics were powered up when the camera took it's swim in the sea, I think it's quite unlikely you'll restore function. Probably the best you can hope for, if the camera was wet inside, is to recover the images from the memory card.


14

(I'm promoting my comments to an answer now that I have a little more time.) In addition to all the points brought up in other answers, there are several non-technical, "user experience", reasons that a DSLR is superior to a smart phone. The first relates to the "immediacy" of the controls. After a few (dozen) hours using a camera the ...


14

You can use ImageMagick: convert original.tif -define jpeg:extent=9MB output.jpg And quoting one of the comments: IrfanView will allow you to do it, for those on Windows who are afraid of the command line


13

Late Edit Let me qualify this 'simple' solution by saying that such as LinkedIn, same as any other social media site, will not care a jot what size an image is, so long as it falls over and under certain sizes in [mega]bytes [& possibly over or under a certain size in pixels]. They're not photographers or graphic designers, their interest is simple ...


11

This isn't possible with DSLRs using optical viewfinders. This image (source) shows the cross-section of a DSLR: Normally light enters the lens, reflects off the mirror (#2) into the pentaprism (#8) and then to the optical viewfinder (#9). When the mirror is in this position, light does not reach the sensor. When recording a video, the sensor makes 60 ...


11

inkista has an excellent answer above. My Panasonic GX-80 doesn't support 'Lumix tether for streaming' - but it does have a Wifi function allowing you to watch a live preview from a smartphone. Over the course of a caffeine-fueled long weekend, and helped by the writings of people who'd tried similar things before me, I was able to get the wifi preview ...


9

On top of what has been said, part of a photographer's skills is to make arbitrages between light received, exposure time, and depth of field. With a smartphone, you may experiment with framing, which is very important, but you won't really be able to experiment with light, exposure and depth of field. In a sense, it is like learning to play guitar with only ...


9

It's toast. Salt water is the most corrosive thing you can do to the electronics inside a DSLR that doesn't involve a vat of strong acid. Roger Cicala, the founder of lensrentals.com, has posted at least two blog entries regarding teardowns he did of rental cameras returned after having been exposed to salt water without having actually been submerged in it. ...


8

As mentioned in comments, lenses don't have a maximum shutter time. They just let light through continuously, blocked by the camera's shutter from hitting the sensor. You are also not limited by the camera's internal shutter speeds [at the long end]. Even though the camera's maximum internally-timed shutter is 30 seconds, it also has two 'long' modes, Bulb &...


7

Size matters! Electronic cameras capture images using a light-sensitive imaging chip. The surface of this chip is covered with tiny sites that generate an electrical charge when hit by light. The amount of this charge is hardly measurable and thus photographically useless. Both a large camera and a phone camera must apply amplification to bolster the charge ...


5

Don't. Seriously. There's no reasonably safe way to place high-end camera gear in checked baggage without using a hardened, lockable container such as a Pelican or similar case. If the handling doesn't damage your gear, the handlers will almost certainly make off with it. You could ship them ahead of time via another, more secure method with a small shipment ...


5

Yes. But before I get into it, let's cover some safety stuff. As an astronomer and NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador ... I never talk about looking at the Sun without talking about safety (cause you can really mess yourself up). It is NOT OK to stare at the Sun. This results in an effect similar to getting a bad sunburn ... but on your retina. And like a ...


4

A lot of things have been touched on but upon re-reading your question and seeing you'd get multiple lenses 18-55 mm, 70-300 mm, and 50 mm prime. There is no way a camera phone is going to function with as much versatility as the package you're proposing. Digital zoom is not a feature. It's just cropping a photo. You won't touch a 300mm lens with a camera ...


4

Using native lenses is bound to give you a better experience than with a mount-adapter. Assuming, an adapter that is purely mechanical - as most are - there will be no reduction in image-quality because all these adapters do is create space between the mirrorless mount and the flange distance for the DSLR mount. Although image-quality is bound to be the same,...


3

It looks like the shutter is not functioning correctly. If the shutter gets stuck at some point while it is closing, you'll get some kind of image in the area of the sensor where the shutter was working properly, then white for the rest, with light spilling over into the darker area. That's exactly what your image looks like. You need to send your Nikon in ...


3

Yes. The smartphones are small, easy to use, allways connected to networks, stuffed with all the filters... They, actually, replaced them years ago. But through point-and-shoot cameras. No. The smartphone geometry will never allow to build such optics that can barely close to the DSLR/Mirrorless. Each pixel needs some area to gather photons, the more area it ...


3

No, at least not on the camera. The lens mount of the camera is designed to support the weight of the camera (and some accessories). When used with big heavy lenses (anything bigger than 200mm) the lens supports the camera and not the other way around (a tripod is attached to the lens). Damage to the lens is quite unlikely, too.


3

For Mac users - a new webcam app. I'm adding this to existing 'webcam' questions for future searchers. I am in no way affiliated with this product or the company making it - this is a simple user to user recommendation. I just discovered this today, announced on DPReview a new product called Cascable Pro Webcam £40 [£30 for the first week to 24 July 2020] I'...


3

If you have a Canon or Nikon camera, and a Windows PC, Sparkocam might be a solution. It enables you to connect the camera via USB, and use the camera for for example Skype. I have used my Canon EOS 700D with SparcoCam, and it works well. It is free to try, but costs $49.95 for a standard license for either Canon or Nikon (upgrades for 1 year). From Sparsoft....


3

I just started having this problem when putting my camera in and out of a Aquatech rain covering. I have a Canon R-5, so they do not make an eye-piece for it. I had to take the stretchy hole where the eyepiece goes and stretch it around the existing eye-piece. When doing that, the diopter moves. I decided to try the tape method. I used a duct tape that is ...


3

A lens such as the Canon 18-200mm only makes sense if the convenience of only one lens is more important to you than pretty much all optical performance factors as well as the performance/price ratio. Overall you'll get lower optical quality and pay a premium for the privilege. In order to get such a wide range of focal lengths in a single lens you give up ...


3

As far as I know, they all allow disabling. In fact, all the ones I have direct experience with require specifically enabling Bluetooth or WiFi in order to use it. My Nikon D7200 supports WiFi but it's default disabled. Simply enabling the WiFi on the as shipped camera does indeed put it in an open insecure mode, but the Nikon App will allow you to change it ...


3

Buy a used older camera. My primary DSLR is a Nikon D90, which has absolutely no wireless connections. I bought it used a couple of years ago. One is for sale on Kijiji right now less than an hours drive away from me, and you will probably find one if you look.


2

This article explicitly discusses the differences between the 2. Whether or not those differences are worth any variation in price is entirely up to you. https://www.pentaxforums.com/reviews/pentax-k-1-ii-review/introduction.html Enter the K-1 Mark II, a new DSLR which is almost identical to its predecessor, but with the inclusion of several new elements: ...


2

This option wasn't available when you asked the question, but now that Nikon has introduced its Z-mount mirrorless system, that's the obvious upgrade path while still staying within the Nikon ecosystem. Any of the Z bodies coupled with the Nikon FTZ adapter will let you continue to use all your existing F-mount Nikon glass with the new camera. Mirrorless ...


2

There is no such thing as a "lossless" RGB format representing a color photograph. The only lossless information that is available is the sensor output. Once you start processing, information gets lost that might be retained using different processing methods. In contrast to a "lossless" RGB format, the camera output is not RGB (but ...


2

Now your metering is normal. You say you used to take good pictures in an Indoor office at 1/125, F5.6 and ISO100 that is certainly not right... impossible in fact if your office isn’t a solarium or a special light testing lab... that environment is about 7-8 ev for iso 100 that would be something more like f2.8 1/15 indoors EV With the settings you used you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible