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32

This is usually caused by the camera taking the scene as a whole and treating it as 18% gray. This is the way light meters (and camera meters) are calibrated to see the world. Scene mostly snow? 18% gray. Black cat in a coal mine? 18% gray. The camera doesn't know what you're taking a picture of, so it assumes that the scene is, on average, 18% gray and ...


31

If you read the other answers, it should be apparent that the qualities you seek such as (a) better portraits and (b) the desire to have a blurred background ... aren't really one thing, but a combination of many factors. There are some nuances but the short answer is ... portraits do not require advanced DSLRs (so entry level is fine) but... there are ...


29

The overall difference in typical image quality between a current smartphone like the Huawei P30 Pro and an older DSLR like the Canon EOS Rebel T1i/500D isn't the difference between the sensors. The difference is about who makes the decisions when shooting and, more importantly, in post processing about how both are done. Recent smartphones have gotten very ...


26

You could get a really fast 50mm f/1.4 [or cheaper 1.8] lens for $£€ 200 second-hand that will make those fabulous blurry background photos that smartphones can now fake quite well, in low light too. You couldn't, however, get a smartphone with that capability for much under $£€ 1,000. Additionally... ..if you got bored of the nifty fifty you could sell it ...


18

DXOmark and DXOmark Mobile scores are not directly comparable, you can only compare camera sensor scores to other cameras, and mobile sensor scores to other mobiles. Therefore your observation that the Huawei scores 112 and the 500D 63, so the Huawei sensor is almost twice as good isn't accurate. I can't find a site which directly compares all photographic ...


18

Your camera's light meter measures brightness, but it can't tell if the brightness level it is measuring is a black cat in a coal mine or a white cat in a snowstorm.¹ It assumes everything you point your camera at is somewhere about halfway in between those extremes. ¹ Sure, the scene with the white cat will probably be brighter than the scene with the ...


16

It's important to understand that the image through the lens is inverted in both the lateral (x ↔︎ -x) and vertical (y ↔︎ -y) dimensions. Mathematically, this is the same as a 180° rotation about the z-axis (optical axis). Thus, the upright image entering the lens, after being refracted and focused, leaves the lens flipped both vertically and horizontally. ...


15

The first mainstream applications for electronic image sensors (be it Image-Orthicons, Vidicons, Plumbicons, or CCDs, or CMOS active pixel sensors, be it analog-electronic or digital workflows) were in video, not in still images. Video followed form factors similar to movie film. In movie film, 35mm (equivalent to full frame still) or even 70mm were ...


11

It's not the camera, it's the lens. If you want a cheap and good option for shooting portrait pictures, you should definitely purchase in addition to a DSLR, a 50mm f/1.8 "nifty fifty" lens. Do expect to spend $100-$200 for the lens. 50mm is about optimal for portraits, because the relatively long 50mm focal length on crop sensor cameras is long enough to ...


10

Is setting the aperture without the lens even possible? Considering that the aperture is a part of the lens, not the camera body, no, it is not possible. Telescopes do not typically have variable apertures — there's no need to stop down to limit incoming light (which is absolutely the opposite of what is wanted for star photography), and depth of field ...


10

I still have an old XS camera, which is older than yours. Only 10 Mpx, and with an old 50mm 1.8 lens, and I still use it for a quick portrait or as a backup camera. The point, in reality, is where do you want to expand your Photography skills. For me, the way to "upgrade" a camera is off-camera light. I would focus more on how to light a subject rather ...


10

Your link discusses how a CCD (charge coupled device) image sensor works. Note, CCDs have applications besides images sensors, but the vast majority of CCDs are used as image sensors, and that is the only primary application I will be discussing. CCDs In typical CCDs used for color image sensing each CCD cell has a color filter over it. The most commonly ...


8

Electronic viewfinder Pros: Potentially smaller and lighter camera bodies and lenses (particularly wide angle lenses) Can zoom in to verify precise focus and depth of field Can see (almost) exactly what the camera sees, even in low light Can superimpose more complex data over the image (e.g. zebra stripes, focus peaking); see note below. No mirror assembly ...


7

DSLRs have a direct, optical path through the lens. (Well, a reflected direct path.) You are seeing the scene with your eyes. Mirrorless cameras with a viewfinder actually use a small LCD screen — we call this an electronic viewfinder, or "EVF". You are seeing the image read from the sensor processed for viewing, not the scene itself. Both approaches have ...


7

Is an entry level DSLR going to shoot nice portrait pictures? By itself, no, absolutely not. It's easy to make the joke that the camera by itself just sits there and doesn't take pictures at all, being an inanimate object and all. Of course, we know what you actually mean, but there's really some truth to that. A DSLR is by nature a flexible tool, and that ...


7

No, you won't obtain the photon count directly. Also, a camera sensor has noise, not just from photon counting but also from electrical circuits. Also, a DSLR has a color filter on top of the pixels, even if you take only grayscale images. It will probabilistically filter away some photons. If the photon is of the correct color, chances of it passing the ...


7

Big sensors cost more than small sensors for more-or-less the same reason that big TVs cost more than small TVs. Compare a 30-inch TV and a 60-inch TV (about 75cm and 150cm, if you prefer). Miniaturization is no problem — we could make all of the parts of the 30-inch TV way smaller without running into any difficulty. The 30-inch TV costs less to make than ...


7

As far as I can tell, at least in my two Canon DSLRs you cannot wrap a wire around the battery contacts in the battery compartment. So you could have to implement some sort of connector, for instance by disassembling an old battery(*). You also have to make an outboard receptacle with outgoing wires on which you can insert a camera battery, assuming you ...


7

In addition to what has been said, you cannot be certain that a given camera design can deal with the extra (ohmic or inductive) impedance long wires introduce. The power supply circuit could get rather confused when it experiences a larger than expected voltage drop when attempting to draw a quick current pulse, and could do things like suddenly assume a ...


6

I know how the focus points are painted on the mirror.. Not really, because I've never seen focus points or anything else (intentionally) painted on a reflex mirror. It would be out of focus. Technically, those that do it the way you think you are describing etch them onto the focusing screen, which is located in the roof of the mirror box. But other ...


6

Without having more information on how exactly you took your image, and without the possibility to reproduce this effect, one can only guess. I see three possible causes for a sun reflection that is visible in the view finder, but does not appear in the image that is taken by the image sensor: Automatic aperture control Possibly you took your picture with ...


6

Last Sunday I attended some event as a guest and the light was not at my disposal... I want to do just family and landscape photos in a slow pace and low light... Is there any chance... to upgrade my camera... ? I agree with Tetsujin. Consider a fast prime lens. I'd likely go for 24/2.8 or 35/2. Here are some options: EF-S 24/2.8 STM. Inexpensive and ...


6

Don't feel demotivated Photography is a complicated matter. If it wasn't, this website would not exist for a lack of questions. You are new to photography, so you are still familiarising yourself with many concepts. There is a great deal to keep in mind when taking photos, and keeping an eye on all settings, lighting conditions and all else that comes into ...


6

Because you specifically asked about history... I'd suggest: size, weight, & cost. All those considerations were equally true in the pre-digital (ie film) days. A popular film format was the 110 size. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/110_film The 110 film was cheaper, the cameras were cheaper, and many of the cameras were a lot smaller and lighter ...


6

Long before digital, people sought to produce smaller film formats to address manufacturing, usability, and other cost-benefit issues, which are described in other answers. What is now known as "full frame" was once known as "miniature". If not for miniature and sub-miniature formats, we'd have to carry around cameras like this:


5

The air is full of dust. It's floating around everywhere all the time. When you open the lens in a dusty environment (which is to say "every environment that isn't a clean room"), dust gets into the light-box of the camera. You didn't ask, but this is why seems silly to advise people to point their cameras down while changing lenses. Observe how dust moves ...


5

Check your telescope manual and find the telescope's aperture. Assuming no telescope eyepiece is utilized, the camera is said to be at the "prime focus" position. Find the scope's diameter. Find the scope's focal length. Divide focal length by diameter. The results of this math is the working f number of the system. Example: 1000mm focal length 4 inch ...


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